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The Art of Cooking: The First Modern Cookery Book

Composed by The Eminent Maestro Martino of Como
Edited and with an Intoduction by Luigi Ballerini
Translated amd Annotated by Jeremy Parzen
with Fifty Modernized Recipes by Stefania Barzini
Copyright Date: 2005
Edition: 1
Pages: 208
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt14btfm8
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  • Book Info
    The Art of Cooking
    Book Description:

    Maestro Martino of Como has been called the first celebrity chef, and his extraordinary treatise on Renaissance cookery,The Art of Cooking,is the first known culinary guide to specify ingredients, cooking times and techniques, utensils, and amounts. This vibrant document is also essential to understanding the forms of conviviality developed in Central Italy during the Renaissance, as well as their sociopolitical implications. In addition to the original text, this first complete English translation of the work includes a historical essay by Luigi Ballerini and fifty modernized recipes by acclaimed Italian chef Stefania Barzini.The Art of Cooking,unlike the culinary manuals of the time, is a true gastronomic lexicon, surprisingly like a modern cookbook in identifying the quantity and kinds of ingredients in each dish, the proper procedure for cooking them, and the time required, as well as including many of the secrets of a culinary expert. In his lively introduction, Luigi Ballerini places Maestro Martino in the complicated context of his time and place and guides the reader through the complexities of Italian and papal politics. Stefania Barzini's modernized recipes that follow the text bring the tastes of the original dishes into line with modern tastes. Her knowledgeable explanations of how she has adapted the recipes to the contemporary palate are models of their kind and will inspire readers to recreate these classic dishes in their own kitchens. Jeremy Parzen's translation is the first to gather the entire corpus of Martino's legacy.

    eISBN: 978-0-520-92831-2
    Subjects: Sociology, History

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. [i]-[iv])
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. [v]-[vi])
  3. INTRODUCTION. MAESTRO MARTINO: THE CARNEADES OF COOKS
    (pp. 1-46)
    Luigi Ballerini

    For a good number of years, a few centuries in fact, the only known mention of Maestro Martino was to be found in the writings of the fifteenth-century Italian humanist Bartolomeo Sacchi, who was acquainted with him personally.

    This means that the name of an unknown person was for a while on the lips and twice, at least, in the pen of a “reporter” who, in our day and age, is just as unknown as his “reportee.” The muse of history contributed some humor of its own. So enchanted was Sacchi (who in his own time was actually famous enough...

  4. THE ART OF COOKING
    • CHAPTER ONE MEATS FOR BOILING AND MEATS FOR ROASTING
      (pp. 49-61)

      The fatty meat of oxen and that of beef should be boiled, the loin should be roasted, and the haunch made into cutlets.

      All the meat of mutton is good boiled, except for the shoulder, which is good roasted, as is the haunch.

      Although pork meat is not healthful—no matter how you cook it—the chine should be roasted with onions, and when roasted, pork meat should be salted to taste.

      All the meat of kid is good roasted or boiled, but the hindquarters are best roasted. The same holds for lamb.

      Goat meat is good in the month...

    • CHAPTER TWO HOW TO MAKE EVERY TYPE OF VICTUAL
      (pp. 62-75)

      To make twelve servings: take two librae of almonds and crush well. In order that they may be as white as possible, soak in cool water for a day and a night. Then crush them, and when they have been crushed, add a little cool water so that they do not purge their oil. Then take a capon breast and crush together with the almonds; and take some bread white and soak it in lean capon broth; and crush with the other ingredients; and take a little verjuice, a half ounce of ginger, well peeled so that it is all...

    • CHAPTER THREE HOW TO MAKE EVERY TYPE OF SAUCE
      (pp. 76-79)

      Take the necessary amount of well-peeled and well-crushed almonds. As I have said many times before, add a little cool water as you crush them, so that they do not purge their oil. Take a bit of bread white that has been soaked in verjuice and crush with the almonds, adding some white ginger; that is, well-peeled ginger. Thin this mixture with good verjuice, or orange juice or lemon juice, and pass through a stamine, making it more or less sweet with sugar and tart with verjuice or orange juice, as suits your master’s tastes or whoever’s. This sauce should...

    • CHAPTER FOUR HOW TO MAKE EVERY TYPE OF TORTE
      (pp. 80-91)

      Take a libra and a half of good fresh cheese, finely chop, and crush well; and take twelve or fifteenalbumena,or egg whites, and mix well with the cheese, adding a half libra of sugar and a half ounce of the whitest ginger you can get; similarly add a half pound of rendered lard from good, lean pork; or, instead of lard, the same amount of good, fresh butter; and likewise add the necessary amount of milk, probably a good third of a jug. Then make the dough or rather crust in a pan, suitably thin, and cook very...

    • CHAPTER FIVE HOW TO MAKE EVERY TYPE OF FRITTER
      (pp. 92-95)

      Take some good fresh cheese and a little aged cheese, and crush well, adding a bit of sifted flour to them and the necessary amount of egg whites; likewise, a little milk and some sugar; and grind all these things well together, remove from the mortar, and add a suffcient amount of elderflowers at your own discretion; they should not be crushed or crumbled, so as not to make the mixture too clear, that is, too liquid, so that you can form the round fritters using your hands, or in whatever shape you like, and then fry them in good...

    • CHAPTER SIX HOW TO COOK EGGS IN EVERY WAY
      (pp. 96-98)

      Beat the eggs well together with a little water and milk to make the frittata¹ softer; likewise, add some good cheese that has been grated and cook the frittata in good butter to make it more fatty. Note that, for it to be good, it should not be stirred or overly cooked. If you wish to make it green, take the things mentioned above and add the water from the following herbs: chard, a generous amount of parsley, borage, mint, marjoram, and a lesser amount of sage, passing through a stamine to obtain their water; then remove the herbs that...

    • CHAPTER SEVEN HOW TO COOK EVERY TYPE OF FISH
      (pp. 99-114)

      In this final section, it should be noted in general that every fish to be boiled or fried should be scaled and scraped on the outside, and then opened; and the entrails should be removed before the fish is washed; and conversely, a fish that is to be roasted should not be scaled or scraped or opened, except for saupe, which should be opened and its entrails removed, and similarly shad, from which a certain forked bone, to which its intestines are attached, must be removed through the gills before cooking or roasting.

      First of all, do not cook the...

    • THE RIVA DEL GARDA RECIPES
      (pp. 115-126)

      To make a pepper sauce in the Genoese style, from meat or fish, take the necessary amount of very tender lean meat, and a handful of salt, or more or less, as needed, and the same amount of bread, which has been soaked in lean broth; and once you have ground the meat, thin it with broth together with the other ingredients, and add a generous amount of pepper and saffron; then pass all these things through a stamine and simmer in a pot, stirring often; and this pepper sauce should be served hot; and similarly you can make it...

    • THE NEAPOLITAN RECIPES
      (pp. 127-138)

      Take a pot and put some fatty and lean broth in it, and boil. Then take some well-cleaned rice that has been washed repeatedly with lukewarm water, put it inside, and boil, stirring a few times with a spoon so that it does not stick to the pot. When it is done, add some eggs and grated cheese that have been beaten together with a bit of pepper. Serve in bowls.

      Take some pullets to make broth and put them in a clean pot and fill it with water so it can be well scummed. When it has been scummed,...

  5. MAESTRO MARTINO TODAY: FIFTY MODERNIZED RECIPES
    (pp. 139-192)
    Stefania Barzini
  6. TEXTUAL NOTE
    (pp. 193-196)
    Jeremy Parzen
  7. SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 197-198)
  8. INDEX
    (pp. 199-208)
  9. Back Matter
    (pp. 209-209)