The Complete Poetry

The Complete Poetry: A Bilingual Edition

CÉSAR VALLEJO
EDITED AND TRANSLATED BY CLAYTON ESHLEMAN
WITH A FOREWORD BY MARIO VARGAS LLOSA
AN INTRODUCTION BY EFRAÍN KRISTAL
AND A CHRONOLOGY BY STEPHEN M. HART
Copyright Date: 2007
Edition: 1
Pages: 732
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1pnpjd
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  • Book Info
    The Complete Poetry
    Book Description:

    This first translation of the complete poetry of Peruvian César Vallejo (1892-1938) makes available to English speakers one of the greatest achievements of twentieth-century world poetry. Handsomely presented in facing-page Spanish and English, this volume, translated by National Book Award winner Clayton Eshleman, includes the groundbreaking collectionsThe Black Heralds(1918),Trilce(1922),Human Poems(1939), andSpain, Take This Cup from Me(1939). Vallejo's poetry takes the Spanish language to an unprecedented level of emotional rawness and stretches its grammatical possibilities. Striking against theology with the very rhetoric of the Christian faith, Vallejo's is a tragic vision-perhaps the only one in the canon of Spanish-language literature-in which salvation and sin are one and the same. This edition includes notes on the translation and a fascinating translation memoir that traces Eshleman's long relationship with Vallejo's poetry. An introduction and chronology provide further insights into Vallejo's life and work.

    eISBN: 978-0-520-93214-2
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. FOREWORD
    (pp. ix-x)
    MARIO VARGAS LLOSA

    There are poets whose work can be explained, and there are inexplicable poets, like César Vallejo. But being unable to explain does not mean being unable to understand, or that his poems are incomprehensible, totally hermetic. It means that, contrary to our reading of explicable poets, even after we have studied everything about his poems that rational knowledge has to offer—his sources, his techniques, his unique vocabulary, his subjects, his influences, the historical circumstances surrounding the creation of his poems—we remain in the dark, unable to penetrate that mysterious aureole that we feel to be the secret of...

  4. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xi-xii)
  5. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-21)
    EFRAÍN KRISTAL

    The emotional rawness of César Vallejo’s poetry stretched the Spanish language beyond grammar and lexicon into compelling dissonances and asymmetries, unprecedented and unsurpassed in the history of Hispanic poetry.¹ His affecting directness makes him immediately accessible, even while his poems can defy interpretation. Like Paul Celan, Vallejo has presented daunting perplexities to his readers and translators: his language, fraught with inner tensions, generates false starts, fragmentations, silences, and paradoxes.² His poetry cannot be analyzed within a single register because he writes in multiple ones, and can shift from one to another, or operate simultaneously within several in the same poem....

  6. LOS HERALDOS NEGROS (1918)
    (pp. 22-25)
  7. PLAFONES ÁGILES
    (pp. 26-47)
  8. BUZOS
    (pp. 48-55)
  9. DE LA TIERRA
    (pp. 56-75)
  10. NOSTALGIAS IMPERIALES
    (pp. 76-99)
  11. TRUENOS
    (pp. 100-149)
  12. CANCIONES DE HOGAR
    (pp. 150-163)
  13. TRILCE (1922)
    (pp. 164-323)
  14. POEMAS HUMANOS (1939)
    (pp. 324-565)
  15. ESPAÑA, APARTA DE MÍ ESTE CÁLIZ (1939)
    (pp. 566-620)
  16. NOTES TO THE POEMS
    (pp. 621-676)
  17. AFTERWORD: A TRANSLATION MEMOIR
    (pp. 677-688)

    For nearly fifty years, I have been translating the poetry of César Vallejo. His writing has become the keelson in the ship of poetry I have attempted to construct. Here I would like to offer an overview of my lifelong evolving relationship with Vallejo and with translation, and to evoke some of the experiences that have come out of it. Finally, I would like to say what this companionship has meant to me, as a poet and as a human being.

    While I was a student at Indiana University in 1957, a painter friend, Bill Paden, gave me a copy...

  18. APPENDIX: A CHRONOLOGY OF VALLEJO’S LIFE AND WORKS
    (pp. 689-704)
    STEPHEN M. HART
  19. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 705-706)
  20. INDEX OF SPANISH TITLES AND FIRST LINES
    (pp. 707-712)
  21. INDEX OF ENGLISH TITLES AND FIRST LINES
    (pp. 713-717)
  22. Back Matter
    (pp. 718-718)