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What Is Medicine?: Western and Eastern Approaches to Healing

PAUL U. UNSCHULD
Translated from the German by Karen Reimers
Copyright Date: 2009
Edition: 1
Pages: 256
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1pnt6c
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  • Book Info
    What Is Medicine?
    Book Description:

    What Is Medicine? Western and Eastern Approaches to Healingis the first comparative history of two millennia of Western and Chinese medicine from their beginnings in the centuries BCE through present advances in sciences like molecular biology and in Western adaptations of traditional Chinese medicine. In his revolutionary interpretation of the basic forces that undergird shifts in medical theory, Paul U. Unschuld relates the history of medicine in both Europe and China to changes in politics, economics, and other contextual factors. Drawing on his own extended research of Chinese primary sources as well as his and others' scholarship in European medical history, Unschuld argues against any claims of "truth" in former and current, Eastern and Western models of physiology and pathology.What Is Medicine?makes an eloquent and timely contribution to discussions on health care policies while illuminating the nature of cognitive dynamics in medicine, and it stimulates fresh debate on the essence and interpretation of reality in medicine's attempts to manage the human organism.

    eISBN: 978-0-520-94470-1
    Subjects: Anthropology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-viii)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. ix-xii)
  3. Preface
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
  4. What Is Medicine? WESTERN AND EASTERN APPROACHES TO HEALING
    (pp. 1-220)

    Let us assume the following. We want to understand the functions of the human body. Then, we want to explain these functions to other people. Where do we begin? What does the body disclose to us? A fair amount. Our senses tell us much: there is color in the face and on the body, seen with our eyes. There are odors that we smell with our nose. There are sounds in the chest and the abdomen that we hear with our ears. None of this is static; it is always changing, day and night, in times of health and illness....

  5. Afterword
    (pp. 221-222)

    Let us assume the following. We want to understand the functions of the human body. Then we want to explain these functions to other people. Where do we begin? What does the body disclose to us? A fair amount. Our senses tell us much: there is color in the face and on the body, seen with our eyes. There are odors that we smell with our nose. There are sounds in the chest and abdomen that we hear with our ears. None of this is static; it is always changing, day and night, in times of health and illness. We...

  6. Notes
    (pp. 223-228)
  7. Index
    (pp. 229-236)
  8. Back Matter
    (pp. 237-237)