Ants of North America

Ants of North America: A Guide to the Genera

Brian L. Fisher
Stefan P. Cover
Ginny Kirsch
Jennifer Kane
Color images created by April Nobile
Copyright Date: 2007
Edition: 1
Pages: 216
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1pp0bz
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Ants of North America
    Book Description:

    Ants are among the most conspicuous and the most ecologically important of insects. This concise, easy-to-use, authoritative identification guide introduces the fascinating and diverse ant fauna of the United States and Canada. It features the first illustrated key to North American ant genera, discusses distribution patterns, explores ant ecology and natural history, and includes a list of all currently recognized ant species in this large region. * New keys to the 73 North American ant genera illustrated with 250 line drawings ensure accurate identification * 180 color images show the head and profile of each genus and important species groups * Includes a glossary of important terms

    eISBN: 978-0-520-93455-9
    Subjects: Zoology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. xi-xiv)

    There is something profoundly fascinating about ants, even when they are being a nuisance. In large part, this is because they do so many things that remind us of ourselves, and have been doing them for over 100 million years. Like humans, ants are social, living exclusively in highly organized societies that evolved originally from family groups (in the case of ants, the group consists of a mother and her offspring). Like humans, ants exhibit a seemingly endless variety of complex social behaviors. Ants were the first herders, agriculturalists, and food storage experts. Some ants fight vicious territorial wars, some...

  5. KEY TO NORTH AMERICAN ANT GENERA BASED ON THE WORKER CASTE
    (pp. 1-52)

    1 Upper plate (tergite) of the last abdominal segment (pygidium) flattened and with a pair of distally converging rows of spines or peg-like teeth (A). (Cerapachyinae). . . . . . . . 2 — Pygidium rounded and without a pair of distally converging rows of spines or peg-like teeth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

    2 (1) Antenna 12-segmented. Scape greatly flattened along entire length. Antennal socket without lateral carina. Frontal carinae slightly expanded laterally and sometimes covering part of the antennal insertions (A) . ....

  6. TAXONOMIC DESCRIPTIONS
    (pp. 53-154)

    The subfamily Amblyoponinae has a worldwide distribution and is comprised of nine genera, with onlyAmblyopone(four species) and one introduced species ofPrionopeltapresent in North America. The members of this subfamily are mostly cryptobiotic predators that nest in soil or ground litter.

    Members of the genusAmblyoponeare specialist predators of certain arthropods, especially centipedes, living in soil or rotten wood. The bizarre feeding habits ofAmblyoponeextend well beyond their prey specialization and have led some to call this group by the evocative name “dracula ants.” Some species ofAmblyoponepractice a form of nonlethal cannibalism in...

  7. ANT GENERA OF NORTH AMERICA BY SUBFAMILY
    (pp. 155-156)
  8. ANT SPECIES NORTH OF MEXICO: A WORKING LIST
    (pp. 157-166)
  9. TERMINOLOGY
    (pp. 167-174)
  10. IDENTIFICATION REFERENCES
    (pp. 175-182)
  11. GENERAL REFERENCES
    (pp. 183-188)
  12. INDEX
    (pp. 189-195)
  13. Back Matter
    (pp. 196-202)