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Excavations at Nemea III: The Coins

ROBERT C. KNAPP
JOHN D. MAC ISAAC
Copyright Date: 2005
Edition: 1
Pages: 355
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1pp25f
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  • Book Info
    Excavations at Nemea III
    Book Description:

    Since 1974 the University of California at Berkeley has been sponsoring extensive excavations at the Panhellenic athletic festival center of ancient Nemea in the modern Greek province of Korinthia. With its well-documented excavation and clear historical context, the site offers an excellent opportunity for investigation and analysis. This volume, the third in a series of publications on Nemea, is a detailed presentation of the more than three thousand legible coins from all over the ancient world that have been unearthed there. The coins, which are mostly bronze but show an unusually high proportion of silver, reflect the periods of greatest activity at the site—the late Archaic and Early Classical, the Early Hellenistic, the Early Christian, and the Byzantine. More than a compendium of data, the study breaks new ground with its analysis and contextualization of numismatic evidence in an archaeological setting.

    eISBN: 978-0-520-92790-2
    Subjects: Archaeology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. ix-xii)
    Robert C. Knapp and John D. Mac Isaac
  4. List of Illustrations
    (pp. xiii-xx)
  5. SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY AND ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xxi-xxviii)
  6. SPECIALIZED TERMINOLOGY AND ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THE TEXT AND CATALOGUES
    (pp. xxix-xxx)
  7. ELEVATIONS, GRID REFERENCES, AND MEASUREMENTS
    (pp. xxxi-xxxii)
  8. PART I THE CLASSICAL, HELLENISTIC, ROMAN PROVINCIAL, AND ROMAN COINS
    • CONSPECTUS OF COINS
      (pp. 3-10)
    • INTRODUCTION: ARCHAEONUMISMATICS AND NEMEA
      (pp. 11-62)

      Coins from an excavation present special problems and challenges. The coordination of archaeology and numismatics to produce information that neither discipline produces of itself requires careful excavation, recording, and numismatic methodology. The site of Nemea (Fig. 1) offers a well-documented excavation (Fig. 2), a fairly clear and brief historical context, and a reasonable number and variety of coins. It provides, therefore, an excellent opportunity for archaeonumismatic investigation.¹

      The archaeology of the site can be set out briefly; theGuideand other volumes in the Nemea publication series provide more detail. The site is dominated by the Early Hellenistic Temple and...

    • Catalogue of Coins, Part I
      (pp. 63-180)

      The Catalogue is arranged geographically according to the system of the British Museum’sCatalogue of Greek Coins. Coins of Rome follow the Greek coins.

      Preceding each group of coins, information about the group as a whole is presented as follows:

      Each entry provides the following information:

      Unless otherwise noted, the “date of context” is supplied by ceramic evidence; because of the churned-up nature of many regions in the site, this context date often has little to do with the coin’s date, but it is often enough useful to include it systematically here. The date notation system indicates the portion of...

  9. PART II THE EARLY CHRISTIAN AND LATER COIN FINDS FROM NEMEA
    • INTRODUCTION
      (pp. 183-190)

      About 40% of the numismatic finds from the Sanctuary of Nemean Zeus and the Early Hellenistic Stadium are certainly Early Christian or later in origin, and since this group is in general poorly preserved relative to the Greek and earlier Roman material,342it is quite likely that nearly half of all the coin finds were originally of these periods. These coins are the legacy of two cultural horizons, agricultural settlements of the 5th and 6th centuries after Christ on the one hand, and of the 12th and 13th centuries after Christ on the other. Each of these horizons has a...

    • Catalogue of Coins, Part II
      (pp. 191-238)

      Preceding each group of coins, information about the group as a whole is presented as follows:

      If no mint is shown, none is named on the coins themselves.

      Entries for individual coins provide the following information:

      See the Select Bibliography, pp.xxi–xxvii, for abbreviations used in the references, and the Note on Chronological Terms, p.xxx, for the definition of the terms “Early Christian” and “Byzantine” as used here. In addition, please note that the “context” refers to the archaeological context and that its date is based on ceramics. As a result, there are times when the ceramically dated context will...

  10. INDEX OF SUBJECTS, ANCIENT SOURCES, AND MODERN SCHOLARS
    (pp. 239-247)
  11. INDICES TO THE CATALOGUE
    (pp. 248-270)
  12. INDEX OF INVENTORIED COINS FROM THE NEMEA EXCAVATIONS
    (pp. 271-290)
  13. [PLATES]
    (pp. None)