Learning in the Global Era

Learning in the Global Era: International Perspectives on Globalization and Education

Edited by Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco
Copyright Date: 2007
Edition: 1
Pages: 335
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1pp31z
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  • Book Info
    Learning in the Global Era
    Book Description:

    An international gathering of leading scholars, policymakers, and educators takes on some of the most difficult and controversial issues of our time in this groundbreaking exploration of how globalization is affecting education around the world. The contributors, drawing from innovative research in both the social sciences and the neurosciences, examine the challenges and opportunities now facing schools as a result of massive migration flows, new economic realities, new technologies, and the growing cultural diversity of the world's major cities. Writing for a wide audience, they address such questions as: How do we educate all youth to develop the skills and sensibilities necessary to thrive in globally linked, technologically interconnected economies? What can schools do to meet the urgent need to educate growing numbers of migrant youth at risk of failure in societies already divided by inequality? What are the limits of cultural tolerance as tensions over gender, religion, and race threaten social cohesion in schools and neighborhoods alike? Bringing together scholars with deep experience in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East, this work, grounded in rich examples from everyday life, is highly relevant not only to scholars and policymakers but also to all stakeholders responsible for the day-to-day workings of schools in cities across the globe.

    eISBN: 978-0-520-94149-6
    Subjects: Education

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-x)
  3. List of Tables
    (pp. xi-xii)
  4. List of Illustrations
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
  5. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xv-xviii)
  6. INTRODUCTION: LEARNING IN THE GLOBAL ERA
    (pp. 1-44)
    Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco and Carolyn Sattin

    Human societies, in all their breathtaking differences, face a common task: to transfer a range of skills, values, and sensibilities to the next generation. Socialization of the young is culturally defined and highly varied and is constantly evolving. All societies organize formal institutions to nurture in the next generation the qualities to carry forth the work of culture. For the first time in human history, basic education in formal schools has become a normative ideal the world over. Indeed, over the last five decades formal schooling has emerged globally as one of the most important societal institution for the education...

  7. PART ONE INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO LEARNING AND UNDERSTANDING IN THE GLOBAL ERA
    • ONE FROM TEACHING GLOBALIZATION TO NURTURING GLOBAL CONSCIOUSNESS
      (pp. 47-66)
      Veronica Boix Mansilla and Howard Gardner

      Over the past decade, scholarship on globalization and education has shed light on multiple ways to prepare youth to meet current challenges. It has examined the impact of immigration on children’s cognitive, emotional, and linguistic development in migrant and receiving communities (C. Suárez-Orozco & M. Suárez-Orozco 1995, 2001; M. Suárez-Orozco & Qin-Hilliard 2004; M. Suárez-Orozco, C. Suárez-Orozco, & Qin-Hilliard 2005). It has mapped the cognitive and socioemotional competencies at a premium in postindustrial market economies (Levy & Murnane 2004; OECD-PISA 2005). It has advanced educational policies to narrow the opportunity gap across nations. It has revealed the potential of information...

    • TWO UNDERSTANDING CULTURAL PATTERNS
      (pp. 67-84)
      Peter Gärdenfors

      This chapter focuses on the role of understanding in learning and, more specifically, on the use of abstract theories to make sense of the world. Learning a given set of facts about the world is one thing, and learning abstract theories is another, but learning to understand how the theories make sense of the world should be the obvious goal of education.

      As a working hypothesis, I argue thatunderstanding consists of seeing patterns.We find a range of abstract patterns at all levels of thinking. Some of the patterns we perceive are based on our biological constitution, some are...

    • THREE MIND, BRAIN, AND EDUCATION IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION
      (pp. 85-103)
      Tami Katzir, Mary Helen Immordino-Yang and Kurt W. Fischer

      In the early twenty-first century the newly emerging field of mind, brain, and education (MBE) has garnered much attention as both a framework for scientifically grounding educational practice and a way of bringing a developmental-educational perspective to neuroscience. As with most innovations, however, there has been an initial period of overuse and unrealistic expectation, as evidenced in the frequent use of the phrasebrainbased educationin the popular press, the marketing of various “brainbased” children’s products, and the misguided, state-mandated provision of classical music CDs to mothers of newborns in Georgia because of research about the “Mozart effect” on some...

    • FOUR SOCIAL CONDUCT, NEUROBIOLOGY, AND EDUCATION
      (pp. 104-118)
      Hanna Damasio and Antonio Damasio

      A defining feature of citizenship is the practice of appropriate social conduct, which, stated simply, consists of behaviors consonant with the social conventions, ethical rules, and laws of a given culture. Because creating a citizen, in the most ample sense of the term, is arguably one of the main goals of education, it follows that teaching and learning appropriate social conduct constitute critical aspects of education. It follows also that the conditions under which individuals acquire and use the knowledge contained in social conventions, rules, and laws would be of interest to educators concerned with issues of curriculum content and...

  8. PART TWO LEARNING AND THE FUNCTIONS OF EDUCATION IN A CHANGING GLOBAL ECONOMY
    • FIVE THE GLOBAL SPREAD OF WOMEN’S SCHOOLING: Effects on Learning, Literacy, Health, and Children
      (pp. 121-136)
      Robert A. LeVine

      At the Tensta Gymnasium in Stockholm in March 2005, I found myself conversing with three teenage girls whose families came from Eritrea and Ethiopia. As they were correcting my inadequate knowledge of the linguistic relationships between ethnic groups in their home region, I could not help thinking that, had they grown up in that region, the East Horn of Africa—they probably would not have been attending secondary school or speaking English. They might not have gone to school at all. The adult female literacy rate in 2000 was 45 percent in Eritrea and 31 percent in Ethiopia. The proportion...

    • SIX GLOBALIZATION AND EDUCATION: Can the World Meet the Challenge?
      (pp. 137-157)
      Bernard Hugonnier

      By its very nature, education has always been considered a national good, that is, a good that is intrinsically national in origin and can be provided only by national institutions. This is not to say that curricula should be free of influence by foreign cultures or should exclude all foreign elements (geography and history do contain many such elements); neither is it to ignore young people who have studied abroad or scholars who have taught in foreign countries.

      The difference today lies, first, in the numbers in higher education. Some 2.2 million students are studying abroad every year, and this...

    • SEVEN HOW COMPUTERIZED WORK AND GLOBALIZATION SHAPE HUMAN SKILL DEMANDS
      (pp. 158-174)
      Frank Levyand and Richard J. Murnane

      As this chapter is being written, at the midpoint of the first decade of the twenty-first century, the U.S. labor market continues to recover from the 2000–01 recession. By 2005, for example, seven million more people were working than were employed two years earlier. This employment growth is the net outcome of two competing forces: some occupations expand, while work that can be done at lower cost by computers or by workers in lower-wage countries continues to disappear. The result is a changing mix both of jobs and of tasks within jobs. Our purpose in this chapter is to...

    • EIGHT THE POSTINDUSTRIAL WORKPLACE AND CHALLENGES TO EDUCATION
      (pp. 175-192)
      Kai-ming Cheng

      As a student of education policies, I started feeling uneasy about not looking at the world outside the educational system when the Education Commission was formulating its blueprint for educational reform in Hong Kong in 2000. This uneasiness was prompted by my daughter, who had just joined one of the leading investment banks; as a graduate of anthropology and linguistics, she had no prior knowledge of finance and accounting whatsoever. My curiosity led me to look into the realities of the contemporary workplace. I was shocked to discover that the kinds of organizations we were familiar with and used as...

  9. PART THREE LEARNING, IMMIGRATION, AND INTEGRATION
    • NINE ON THE NEED FOR TEACHING INTERCULTURAL SKILLS: Challenges for Education in a Globalizing World
      (pp. 195-212)
      Rita Süssmuth

      The world in which we live is rapidly globalizing. People around the world are developing a common consciousness of the globe as a series of interconnected components in which changes made in one part of the world have a marked effect elsewhere, despite spatial separation and linguistic, cultural, religious, or ethnic differences. However, local knowledge and the integration of youth into local contexts are still of vital importance in a globalizing world. The greater global context in which young people live plays an ever more important role in the mental, spiritual, and economic development of future generations. Educational systems around...

    • TEN THE INTEGRATION OF IMMIGRANT YOUTH
      (pp. 213-231)
      Maurice Crul

      The integration of immigrants and their offspring into the receiving society is a primary challenge of globalization (C. Suárez-Orozco 2004, p. 173). The oldest children born to postwar immigrants to west central Europe have recently finished their educational careers and entered the labor market. This group comprising children of immigrants in Europe is very diverse. The largest subgroup consists of children of labor migrants, followed by children of immigrants from former European colonies. The group of children of refugees is growing very rapidly and is also highly diverse. Marcelo Suárez-Orozco and Desirée Baolian Qin-Hilliard (2004) argue that educators should develop...

    • ELEVEN THE EDUCATION OF IMMIGRANT STUDENTS IN A GLOBALIZED WORLD: Policy Debates in Comparative Perspective
      (pp. 232-255)
      Marie McAndrew

      Since the beginning of humankind, population movements have been at the heart of the creation and evolution of civilizations and cultures. More recently, at least from a historical perspective, a whole continent, North America, was radically transformed by an influx of colonizers, slaves, and voluntary migrants. The magnitude of this influx in relation to the receiving native population has never been equaled. Moreover, since the nineteenth century, with the spread of the nation-state model in the Western world, newcomers have generally been received in immigration societies with a mix of openness and rejection, as well as with the expectations and...

    • TWELVE FIRST-LANGUAGE AND -CULTURE LEARNING IN LIGHT OF GLOBALIZATION: The Case of Muslims in Flanders and in the Brussels Area, Belgium
      (pp. 256-271)
      Eugeen Roosens

      In November 2003 the Flanders Forum of Ethnocultural Minorities was held in the Flemish parliament building. More than three hundred representatives of various immigrant organizations—mostly Muslim—and their supporters participated. Several topics were identified as priorities, one of them being education. Although the poor academic performance of non-EU minority children was widely recognized as problematic (see Crul; Süssmuth, both this volume), “first-language and -culture education” was selected as the major topic of the day (Ahalli 2003).

      Forum participants concluded that L&C1 was never taken seriously nor incorporated as a full-fledged part of the school program in Flanders or the...

    • THIRTEEN RETHINKING HONOR IN REGARD TO HUMAN RIGHTS: An Educational Imperative in Troubled Times
      (pp. 272-290)
      Unni Wikan

      On January 21, 2002, in the city of Uppsala, Sweden, Fadime Sahindal was shot dead, the victim of an honor killing. When Fadime was buried on February 4, 2002, Sweden set a precedent that would be hard to maintain. Attending the memorial service were the crown princess, the head of parliament, the minister of integration and equality, the minister of justice, the archbishop of Uppsala, and other dignitaries. Ten thousand carnations, Fadime’s favorite flower, graced the cathedral. The ceremony was broadcast live on Swedish television.¹

      Fadime’s death was a Swedish tragedy, a Swedish trauma. KURDISH WOMAN KILLED ran the morning...

  10. Appendix A. GLOBAL INEQUALITY
    (pp. 291-294)
  11. Appendix B. EXPLANATION OF TERMS
    (pp. 295-296)
  12. Notes on Contributors
    (pp. 297-298)
  13. Index
    (pp. 299-317)
  14. Back Matter
    (pp. 318-319)