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Collected Poems of Philip Lamantia

Collected Poems of Philip Lamantia

P. LAMANTIA
Garrett Caples
Andrew Joron
Nancy Joyce Peters
With a Foreword by Lawrence Ferlinghetti
BIBLIOGRAPHY BY Steven Fama
Copyright Date: 2013
Edition: 1
Pages: 512
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt3fh32d
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  • Book Info
    Collected Poems of Philip Lamantia
    Book Description:

    The Collected Poems of Philip Lamantia represents the lifework of the most visionary poet of the American postwar generation. Philip Lamantia (1927-2005) played a major role in shaping the poetics of both the Beat and the Surrealist movements in the United States. First mentored by the San Francisco poet Kenneth Rexroth, the teenage Lamantia also came to the attention of the French Surrealist leader André Breton, who, after reading Lamantia's youthful work, hailed him as a "voice that rises once in a hundred years." Later, Lamantia went "on the road" with Jack Kerouac and shared the stage with Allen Ginsberg at the famous Six Gallery reading in San Francisco, where Ginsburg first read "Howl." Throughout his life, Lamantia sought to extend and renew the visionary tradition of Romanticism in a distinctly American vernacular, drawing on mystical lore and drug experience in the process. The Collected Poems gathers not only his published work but also an extensive selection of unpublished or uncollected work; the editors have also provided a biographical introduction.

    eISBN: 978-0-520-95489-2
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-xviii)
  3. Foreword
    (pp. xix-xx)
    Lawrence Ferlinghetti

    I first saw the young Philip Lamantia sometime in about 1954 at one of Kenneth Rexroth’s Friday night soirées in his big old flat above Jack’s Record Cellar at 250 Scott Street in the old Fillmore district when it was still largely a black ghetto. Local and itinerant poets and other flickering literary lights would show up, usually loaded in more ways than one but mainly with the latest poetry. Rexroth, with his book review program on KPFA radio, was the reigning avant-garde arbiter of all things radically poetic. He was an anarchist and libertarian in those days when libertarians...

  4. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xxi-xxii)
  5. High Poet: The Life and Work of Philip Lamantia
    (pp. xxiii-lxiv)
  6. Editorial Note
    (pp. lxv-lxvi)
  7. TOUCH OF THE MARVELOUS (1943–1949)

  8. from EROTIC POEMS (1946)

  9. POEMS 1943–1955

  10. from TAU (1955)

  11. EKSTASIS (1959)

  12. from NARCOTICA (1959)

    • I Demand Extinction of Laws Prohibiting Narcotic Drugs!
      (pp. 107-108)
    • Bones
      (pp. 108-108)
    • Opium Cocaine Hemp
      (pp. 109-110)
    • Opium, Put Down of Laws against Opium!
      (pp. 110-111)
    • Memoria
      (pp. 111-112)
  13. POEMS 1955–1962

  14. DESTROYED WORKS TYPESCRIPT (1948–1960)

  15. DESTROYED WORKS (1962)

    • HYPODERMIC LIGHT

      • It’s absurd I can’t bring my soul to the eye of odoriferous fire
        (pp. 179-179)
      • That the total hatred
        (pp. 179-179)
      • old after midnight spasm
        (pp. 180-180)
      • They shot me full of holes
        (pp. 180-180)
      • U.S.S. San Francisco
        (pp. 181-181)
      • Immense blank void
        (pp. 181-182)
      • In camera of sempiternity you walk
        (pp. 182-182)
      • This World’s Beauty
        (pp. 183-183)
      • Resurrections

        • It is I who create the world and put it to rest
          (pp. 183-184)
        • A theater of masked actors in a trance
          (pp. 184-184)
        • I have never made a poem
          (pp. 185-185)
    • MANTIC NOTEBOOK

      • Apocamantica
        (pp. 186-186)
      • Fin del Mundo

        • The poem says the bombs of America went off
          (pp. 187-187)
        • At the sleeper of inveterate cars
          (pp. 187-188)
      • The Apocalyptic

    • STILL POEMS

      • Vacuous Suburbs
        (pp. 196-196)
      • This is the grey limit
        (pp. 196-196)
      • There’s a mountain of houses upside down
        (pp. 197-197)
      • The night is a space of white marble
        (pp. 197-197)
      • There is this distance between me and what I see
        (pp. 198-198)
      • I have given fair warning
        (pp. 198-198)
    • SPANSULE

  16. POEMS 1963–1964

    • Song for the Intellect
      (pp. 211-211)
    • Babbel/is a language extending the sonic level
      (pp. 211-212)
    • Babbel/Ali ben buri de asalium
      (pp. 212-213)
    • New Babbel
      (pp. 213-213)
    • J. Weir
      (pp. 213-214)
    • Mumbles

      • Bloody Neons
        (pp. 214-218)
      • From My Athens Terrace Ruin
        (pp. 218-219)
      • Going west east directionless pack to Indis
        (pp. 219-220)
    • At Random
      (pp. 220-221)
    • She’s Appeared and Disappeared at Once
      (pp. 221-222)
  17. from SELECTED POEMS (1967)

  18. POEMS 1965–1970

    • Without Props
      (pp. 247-247)
    • There is no death, only sempiternal change
      (pp. 247-248)
    • Thorn of the Air
      (pp. 248-249)
    • The Flying Fix
      (pp. 249-249)
    • Poem for John Hoffman the Poet
      (pp. 250-251)
    • Interjections
      (pp. 251-252)
    • let the tree shaped minion pinion the wonder of drugged dogs
      (pp. 253-254)
  19. THE BLOOD OF THE AIR (1970)

  20. POEMS 1970–1980

    • A Little Washington DC Dream
      (pp. 285-285)
    • 3 Poems

      • On the plain/of the angels
        (pp. 285-286)
      • A gorgon of the language cabal
        (pp. 286-286)
      • Flying beasts/are riveted on the air’s toiling
        (pp. 286-287)
    • The Hand Moves the Word Flies
      (pp. 287-287)
    • Liberty
      (pp. 287-288)
    • Luminous Lady
      (pp. 288-288)
    • Only Creative Violence Reveals the Beauty of the Marvelous
      (pp. 289-289)
    • Panty Hose Stamped with the Head of the Medusa
      (pp. 290-290)
    • Between Sleep and Waking
      (pp. 291-291)
    • Tobacco of Harar
      (pp. 291-292)
    • Weight
      (pp. 292-292)
  21. BECOMING VISIBLE (1981)

  22. POEMS 1981–1985

    • Willow Wand
      (pp. 333-333)
    • Meadowlark West
      (pp. 334-334)
    • Sentiment for the Cordials of Scorpions
      (pp. 334-334)
    • Birder’s Lament
      (pp. 335-335)
    • Poetics by Pluto
      (pp. 335-337)
    • Itinerary of Drift Bane
      (pp. 337-338)
    • Mexico City Central Moon
      (pp. 338-339)
    • Bird: Apparition of Charlie Parker
      (pp. 339-339)
    • Elegy on the Migrating Nightingales Massacred by Nuclear Physics at Chernobyl
      (pp. 339-340)
  23. MEADOWLARK WEST (1986)

  24. POEMS 1986–1993

  25. from BED OF SPHINXES:: NEW AND SELECTED POEMS (1997)

  26. from SYMBOLON (1998–2001)

    • To be served continually with this platter of nothingness
      (pp. 419-419)
    • Ultimate Zone
      (pp. 419-420)
    • Seraphim City
      (pp. 420-421)
    • Theoria
      (pp. 422-422)
    • Recall
      (pp. 422-422)
    • Pure Automatism
      (pp. 423-423)
    • Not with the cerebrating head
      (pp. 423-423)
    • Echo of St. Thérèse of the Child Jesus
      (pp. 423-423)
    • Facing branches of a flowering tree
      (pp. 424-424)
    • Hyper Sleep
      (pp. 424-426)
    • Humans Have Just a Few Genomes More Than Fruit Flies
      (pp. 426-427)
    • Today and yesterday are fusing
      (pp. 427-427)
    • Triple V: The Day Non-surrealism Became Surrealist
      (pp. 427-428)
    • Hidden Truth
      (pp. 429-430)
  27. Selected Bibliography
    (pp. 431-432)
    Steven Fama
  28. Index of Titles
    (pp. 433-437)
  29. Back Matter
    (pp. 438-438)