Method for the One-Keyed Flute

Method for the One-Keyed Flute

Janice Dockendorff Boland
Copyright Date: 1998
Edition: 1
Pages: 236
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt5vjzsd
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  • Book Info
    Method for the One-Keyed Flute
    Book Description:

    This indispensable manual for present-day players of the one-keyed flute is the first complete method written in modern times. Janice Dockendorff Boland has compiled a manual that can serve as a self-guiding tutor or as a text for a student working with a teacher. Referencing important eighteenth-century sources while also incorporating modern experience, the book includes nearly 100 pages of music drawn from early treatises along with solo flute literature and instructional text and fingering charts. Boland also addresses topics ranging from the basics of choosing a flute and assembling it to more advanced concepts such as tone color and eighteenth-century articulation patterns.

    eISBN: 978-0-520-92127-6
    Subjects: Music

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-x)
  3. Preface
    (pp. xi-xii)
  4. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
    J.D.B.
  5. Chapter i ABOUT THE ONE-KEYED FLUTE
    (pp. 1-16)

    The one-keyed flute was developed from the keyless, cylindrical-bored Renaissance flute, possibly by 1660. Its beginnings are sketchy at best. Historians have traditionally credited the Hotteterre and Philidor families at the French court of Louis XIV with the “perfection” of the flute. New evidence has challenged that position (Powell, 1996), but we, as yet, have nothing to replace it. Regardless, early one-keyed flutes had three sections: a more-or-less cylindrical head joint, a conical middle joint with six tone holes, and a foot joint with one tone hole covered by a key. Later, probably by about 1720, makers divided the middle...

  6. Chapter ii LEARNING TO PLAY THE ONE-KEYED FLUTE
    (pp. 17-52)

    You are embarking on a mission to learn a instrument totally different from the modern flute. The one-keyed flute is not inferior to the modern Boehm-system flute, as has been suggested by some twentieth-century writers; it is merely different. The flute in its one-keyed version suited the needs of music and musical expression for well over one hundred years. It is our challenge to explore that expressive capacity.

    In this exploration, it is important to study the early flute tutors, for there is much to be learned. This text is full of references to the more important eighteenth-century tutors. However,...

  7. Chapter iii FINGERINGS FOR THE ONE-KEYED FLUTE
    (pp. 53-100)

    A glance at the Complete Fingering Chart on page 65 will show the reader that there are far more fingering choices for a given note on the one-keyed flute than for the modern flute. One set of fingerings (as represented on the Basic Fingering Chart on page 63) cannot in good conscience be applied to all one-keyed flutes. The flutes themselves vary so—each differs in bore size, tone hole size, and tone hole placement. According to James (1826), a flute with a large bore and large tone holes must have different fingerings than one with smaller holes and a...

  8. Chapter iv EXERCISES AND TUNES TO PLAY
    (pp. 101-182)

    The exercises and tunes in this chapter are taken from flute tutors and other little books published for the flute dating 1707–1851. Remember that the one-keyed flute was still in use long after keyed flutes made their appearance in the second half of the eighteenth century.

    Treatises from the eighteenth century are full of simple tunes—most are void of scale exercises and tone studies of the kind found in modern method books. The tunes and exercises that follow were chosen to give you a broad spectrum of the pieces played by eighteenth- and nineteenth-century flutists. None of the...

  9. Chapter v MODERN STUDIES FOR THE ONE-KEYED FLUTE
    (pp. 183-194)

    There is a real temptation on the part of today’s one-keyed flutist to skip the systematic building of technique and proceed directly to the solo repertoire. Don’t be one of those players. As is true with modern flute playing, technique is built through the practicing of tone studies, scales, thirds, chords, etc.

    The following are modern exercises which I designed for the one-keyed flute. Not all keys are covered; the exercises are limited to 4 sharps and 3 flats. You will rarely find literature which extends beyond these boundaries.

    Play the following exercisesslowly. Pay extraordinary attention to use of...

  10. Appendix A THE “TOP 13” EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY FLUTE TUTORS
    (pp. 195-209)
  11. Appendix B ON REPERTOIRE FOR THE BEGINNING ONE-KEYED FLUTIST
    (pp. 210-218)
  12. Annotated Bibliography: BEFORE 1853
    (pp. 219-223)
  13. Annotated Bibliography: AFTER 1853
    (pp. 224-228)