Plants of the San Francisco Bay Region

Plants of the San Francisco Bay Region: Mendocino to Monterey

LINDA H. BEIDLEMAN
EUGENE N. KOZLOFF
Copyright Date: 2003
Edition: 3
Pages: 512
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt5vk081
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  • Book Info
    Plants of the San Francisco Bay Region
    Book Description:

    This is the definitive botanic guide to the wetlands, woodlands, coastlines, hills, and valleys of the beautiful and diverse San Francisco Bay Region. For this extensively revised and redesigned third edition ofPlants of the San Francisco Bay Region, the identification keys have been thoroughly updated to include 21 new families, 155 new species, and approximately 330 changes in the scientific names, ensuring that this popular book will continue to be the most comprehensive and authoritative identification guide to the region's native and introduced plants.• Easy-to-use keys describe more than 2,000 species of wild flowers, trees, shrubs, weeds, and ferns.• Hundreds of line drawings and color photographs support accurate identification.• Plants are identified by both common and scientific names, making this guide an essential resource for amateur naturalists, students, and professionals.

    eISBN: 978-0-520-95823-4
    Subjects: Botany & Plant Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. PREFACE TO THE THIRD EDITION
    (pp. ix-x)
    Linda H. Beidleman
  4. ILLUSTRATIONS OF PLANT STRUCTURES
    (pp. xi-xiv)
  5. ABBREVIATIONS AND GLOSSARY
    (pp. xv-xxiv)
  6. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-24)

    Although much of the San Francisco Bay Region is densely populated and industrialized, many thousands of acres within its confines have been set aside as parks and preserves. Most of these tracts were not rescued until after they had been altered. The construction of roads, the modification of drainage patterns, grazing by livestock, and the introduction of aggressive species are just a few of the factors that have initiated irreversible changes in the region’s plant and animal life. Yet on the slopes of Mount Diablo and Mount Tamalpais, in the redwood groves at Muir Woods, and in some of the...

  7. Color plates
    (pp. None)
  8. KEYS FOR IDENTIFICATION OF SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION PLANTS

    • KEY TO MAJOR PLANT GROUPS
      (pp. 25-25)
    • NONFLOWERING PLANT SPECIES AND FAMILIES
      (pp. 26-38)

      Pteridophytes do not have flowers or seeds. Some or all of their leaves, or a specialized portion of a single leaf on a plant, bear structures called “sporangia” (fig.). These are often clustered, forming sori; the sori may be protected, at least for a time, by flaps of tissue or disks called “indusia.” The function of the sporangia is to produce microscopic spores, which are eventually released and scattered by wind. Those spores that reach a suitable situation may develop into very small, short-lived plants called “prothallia” (gametophytes). These represent the sexual phase within the life cycle. Each prothallium produces...

    • FLOWERING PLANT FAMILIES
      (pp. 39-68)
    • FLOWERING PLANT SPECIES
      (pp. 68-400)

      The remainder of the book includes all the higher plant families found in the region except for the ferns, fern allies, and cone-bearing plants, which are in earlier sections. The families are arranged alphabetically in either one of two sections: the Dicotyledonous families or the Monocotyledonous families. Five families—Aristolochiaceae, Calycanthaceae, Ceratophyllaceae, Lauraceae, and Saururaceae—not found in the “Eudicot” section of theJepson Manual(2012) are included in the Dicotyledonous families in this manual. Further information about scientific and common names, plant ranges, and measurements, as well as instructions on how to key a plant, are given in the...

  9. INDEX
    (pp. 401-455)