Canadian Annual Review of Politics and Public Affairs

Canadian Annual Review of Politics and Public Affairs: 1991

EDITED BY DAVID LEYTON-BROWN
Copyright Date: 1998
Pages: 344
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/9781442672048
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  • Book Info
    Canadian Annual Review of Politics and Public Affairs
    Book Description:

    Featuring essays on parliament and politics, Ottawa and the provinces, and external affairs, the Canadian Annual Review of Politics and Public Affairs provides a comprehensive account of the year?s events.

    eISBN: 978-1-4426-7204-8
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-viii)
  3. Contributors
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. Canadian calendar 1991
    (pp. xi-2)
  5. EDITORʼS INTRODUCTION – THE YEAR IN REVIEW
    (pp. 3-10)

    The major themes of 1991 were carried forward from 1990. The federal and provincial governments were preoccupied with constitutional and economic problems. The failure in 1990 of the constitutional amendments known as the Meech Lake Accord left all governments grappling with new approaches to the resulting backlash of Quebec nationalism and other unresolved constitutional aspirations. The ongoing recession compounded the deficit problems of almost every government, and declining tax revenues coupled with reduced federal transfer payments led to painful budget cuts across the provinces.

    Quebec responded to the failure of the Meech Lake Accord with an ongoing debate about constitutional...

  6. THE FEDERAL PERSPECTIVE

    • Parliament and politics
      (pp. 13-59)
      ROBERT EVERETT

      It was not hard to imagine that the year 1991 might some day represent a turning point in Canadian politics, for it was brimming with potentially momentous developments, stark contrasts, uncertainties, and ironies. In a sense, the year formed a natural watershed. A new session of Parliament opened, and the Progressive Conservative government under Prime Minister Brian Mulroney passed the mid-point of its second term. Along the way Canada was declared the second most favoured nation on earth by the United Nations Development Program (22 May). The distinction made the prospect of Quebec’s separation all the more bewildering to those...

    • Ottawa and the provinces
      (pp. 60-75)
      MICHAEL HOWLETT

      Like every year before it over the previous decade, 1991 was dominated by constitutional manoeuvring between the federal and provincial levels of Canada’s government. Following upon the failure of the 1987 Meech Lake Accord to achieve the required unanimous support of the provinces by a mid 1990 deadline, 1991 saw the emergence of the threat of a new referendum on the independence of the province of Quebec, and witnessed the generation of a new set of federal proposals designed to address the constitutional aspirations both of that province and of the other regions of the country. By year’s end, a...

    • External affairs and national defence
      (pp. 76-136)
      ANDREW RICHTER

      Whereas 1990 clearly marked the end of the post-Second World War international system, 1991 represented the start of a new one, one in which change and uncertainty appeared to be the defining terms. With the Cold War now over, decision-makers were faced with a less predictable, more fluid, global environment. In Canada, the year witnessed a number of critical developments in both external affairs and national defence.

      For the first time since the Korean War some four decades earlier, Canadian military forces were used in combat, as they took part in Operation Desert Storm, the U.S.-led campaign designed to force...

  7. The provincial perspectives
    (pp. 137-278)
    R.D. DYCK, FRANÇOIS ROCHER, ROBERT FINBOW, RICHARD WILBUR, GEOFFREY LAMBERT, G.L. KRISTIANSON, JOHN CROSSLEY, DAVID SMITH, PETER McCORMICK, RAYMOND B. BLAKE and JAMES B. LAWSON

    In 1991 Ontario witnessed its first full year of NDP government. Elected largely by default in late 1990, and inheriting an economy ravaged by recession, Bob Rae’s new regime demonstrated numerous signs of inexperience. Budgetary problems, cabinet resignations, and policy reversals dominated media and public consciousness of the government, and tended to eclipse its many substantive accomplishments.

    Government Finances. Overshadowing everything else in the public life of Ontario in 1991 was the government’s handling of its finances, including, especially, its April budget. Even before the NDP assumed power on 1 October 1990, officials in the Treasury Department were predicting a...

  8. Obituaries 1991
    (pp. 279-282)
  9. Index of names
    (pp. 283-296)
  10. Index of subjects
    (pp. 297-313)