The Correspondence of Erasmus

The Correspondence of Erasmus: Letters 1535-1657 (1525), Volume 11

translated by Alexander Dalzell
annotated by Charles G. Nauert
Volume: 11
Copyright Date: 1994
Pages: 476
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/9781442680975
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  • Book Info
    The Correspondence of Erasmus
    Book Description:

    The Peasant's War in Germany and his own ill-health combined to keep Erasmus confined to the city of Basel during 1525, but he was still able to maintain an active correspondence spanning all of Europe. In the preceding year, he had published De libero artbitrio/Freedom of the Will, his first open attack on the teachings of Martin Luther. Despite this public defence of Catholic doctrine, Erasmus was continually forced in his correspondence to reply to open or veiled attacks by Catholic critics.

    Erasmus directly addressed one of his critics, No+l BTda, of the Paris theological faculty, in the spring of 1525. BTda was preparing analyses of Erasmus' publications that would eventually form the basis for a formal condemnation. Erasmus' correspondence with BTda, intended to head off such a condemnation, continued past 1525 and became increasingly hostile in tone. That same year, Erasmus also followed up reports that an influential Italian humanist, Alberta Pio, Prince of Carpi, was circulating at the papal curia a manuscript accusing Erasmus of being the major source of Luther's errors. Again, he directly addressed his opponent in order to prove his orthodoxy and to urge (in vain) that no such attack be published. In both cases, however, despite his break with Luther and his public and private opposition to the Protestant leader Oecolampadius in Basel, he was unsuccessful in turning aside the hostility of his Catholic critics.

    eISBN: 978-1-4426-8097-5
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Illustrations
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. Preface
    (pp. xi-xxiii)
    CGN
  5. Map showing the principal places mentioned in volume 11
    (pp. xxiv-xxiv)
  6. THE CORRESPONDENCE OF ERASMUS LETTERS 1535 TO 1657
    (pp. 1-400)

    This letter to John Longland (1473-1547), bishop of Lincoln, one of his best friends among the English bishops, is the dedication for Erasmus'In Psalmum quartum concio(Basel: Froben, February 1525) and was first printed there. In Ep 1570 Longland acknowledged this dedication. Though he was considerably more conservative than Erasmus, he remained friendly and in later years frequently sent him gifts of money (Epp 1758, 1769, 2072, 2159, 2227, 3104, 3108). His interest in the Psalms was genuine: he was a distinguished preacher, and his Lenten sermons at court were based on five of the penitential Psalms. Erasmus later...

  7. TABLE OF CORRESPONDENTS
    (pp. 402-404)
  8. WORKS FREQUENTLY CITED
    (pp. 405-408)
  9. SHORT-TITLE FORMS FOR ERASMUS’ WORKS
    (pp. 409-412)
  10. Index
    (pp. 413-477)
  11. Back Matter
    (pp. 478-478)