The Correspondence of Erasmus

The Correspondence of Erasmus: Letters 1658-1801 (1526-1527), Volume 12

translated by Alexander Dalzell
annotated by Charles G. Nauert
Volume: 12
Copyright Date: 2003
Pages: 500
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/9781442680982
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    The Correspondence of Erasmus
    Book Description:

    The letters in this volume cover Erasmus's correspondence for all of 1526 and roughly the first quarter of 1527, a difficult period marked by two bouts of acute illness and attacks launched against him by conservative Catholics.

    eISBN: 978-1-4426-8098-2
    Subjects: Religion

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Illustrations
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. Preface
    (pp. xi-xxviii)
  5. Map
    (pp. xxix-xxx)
  6. THE CORRESPONDENCE OF ERASMUS LETTERS 1658 TO 1801
    (pp. 1-518)

    Cordial greetings. A month ago¹ I wrote to tell you how things were going. I hope you received my letter and the little jar of imported fruit that I sent you as a gift.

    With regard to the money I received on your behalf from England, I was anxious that it reach you quickly and with less risk of loss, so I made the following arrangements: I handed over to Martin Lompart of Basel² 138½ écus d’or au soleil³ to send on to you. In exchange he gave me a receipt, which I am enclosing with this letter. This is...

  7. LETTERS FROM JUAN DE VERGARA AND OTHERS CONCERNING ERASMUS September 1522–August 1527
    (pp. 519-536)

    The six letters translated here from Appendix 18 of Allen VI were exchanged between Spanish admirers of Erasmus. The first, written in 1522, is a selection by Allen from a letter from Juan de Vergara at Valladolid to Juan Luis Vives, then living in Antwerp. In it Vergara urges Vives to make sure that books by two Spanish critics of Erasmus, Sancho Carranza and Diego López Zúñiga, reached Erasmus at Basel. The letter deals with the early criticisms of Erasmus by conservative Spanish scholars and is therefore closely linked to the five letters appended to CWE 8 (page 336–46)...

  8. ERASMUS’ FIRST WILL
    (pp. 537-550)

    The earliest of Erasmus’ three wills, which was sealed in the presence of witnesses in Basel on 22 January 1527, survives at Basel in a copy written in the hand of the heir or trustee (that is, the person selected to take charge of administering the estate), Bonifacius Amerbach, who as a jurist may well have advised Erasmus on its form. Ludwig Sieber was the first to edit: itDas Testament des Erasmus vom 22. Januar 1527(Basel 1889). The will was never formally put into effect, since Erasmus drew up a second will (of which no copy survives) in...

  9. MONEY, WAGES, AND REAL INCOMES IN THE AGE OF ERASMUS: THE PURCHASING POWER OF COINS AND OF BUILDING CRAFTSMEN’S WAGES IN ENGLAND AND THE LOW COUNTRIES FROM 1500 TO 1540
    (pp. 551-700)
    JOHN H. MUNRO

    Those reading the voluminous correspondence of Erasmus (1466–1536), in particular from the 1490s, soon become aware of the wide variety of coins and other forms of money that he used on his far-ranging travels, from his homeland in the Burgundian-Hapsburg Netherlands to England, France, the Rhineland, Southern Germany, Switzerland, and Italy. Three major questions come to mind. What were the values of these coins — what was their purchasing power in terms of everyday commodities? What was the real value of the various benefices and stipends that Erasmus received from his benefactors: was he really so ill paid, as...

  10. TABLE OF CORRESPONDENTS
    (pp. 701-705)
  11. WORKS FREQUENTLY CITED
    (pp. 706-708)
  12. SHORT-TITLE FORMS FOR ERASMUS’ WORKS
    (pp. 709-712)
  13. Index
    (pp. 713-744)