The English Emblem Tradition

The English Emblem Tradition: Volume 4: William Camden, H.G., and Otto van Veen

William Camden
H.G.
Otto van Veen
PETER M. DALY
LESLIE T. DUER
MARY V. SILCOX
CO-EDITOR FOR CLASSICS: BEERT VERSTRAETE
ASSISTED BY RÜDIGER MEYER
Volume: 4
Copyright Date: 1998
Pages: 400
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/9781442681187
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  • Book Info
    The English Emblem Tradition
    Book Description:

    This volume of the Index Emblematicus deals with three early 17th-century works: Remaines of a Greater Worke Concerning Britaine, by William Camden / The Mirrour of Maiestie, by H.G. / Amorum Emblematta by Otto van Vee.

    eISBN: 978-1-4426-8118-7
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. ix-x)
    PMD
  4. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. xi-xviii)

    There has been a veritable renaissance of interest in emblematics, and not merely as an ancillary to the study of the history of art and literature, but also for its own sake. The scope of emblem study is broad indeed, embracing printed books—probably over 6,000 printings exist,¹ and no one even knows how many manuscript collections² still exist—and literary and theatrical analogues in all European vernacular languages and Neo-Latin, as well as the whole field of ‘applied emblematics,’ which can take the form of wall and ceiling decoration,³ painting and portraiture, tapestry, embroidery, glass, and jewellery. The emblem...

  5. REMAINES OF A GREATER WORKE CONCERNING BRITAINE (London: Simon Waterson, 1605)
    (pp. 3-44)
    WILLIAM CAMDEN

    In length and format, the chapter entitled ‘Impreses’ in William Camden’sRemaines of a Greater Worke Concerning Britaineis comparable with Samuel Daniel’s translation of Paolo Giovio.¹ Indeed, Camden follows Giovio in his definition of the impresa² except that he omits Giovio’s injunction against the presence of the human form: ‘There is required in an imprese … a correspondencie of the picture, which is as the bodie, and the Motte, which as the soule giveth it life. That is, the body must be of faire representation, and the word in some different language, wittie, short, and answerable thereunto neither too...

  6. THE MIRROUR OF MAJESTIE (London: William Jones, 1618)
    (pp. 45-114)
    H.G.

    The Mirrour of Majestieis one of a number of works published in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries that fed the growing interest in heraldry in England.¹ TheMirrouris distinct from other compendia of arms, however, in that it treats the arms of each dedicatee in an emblematic, moralistic fashion and, even further, accompanies each individual’s arms with an emblem on the facing page—except in the case of King James, who is honoured with two emblems.

    The 31 coats of arms and 32 emblems are dedicated to King James, Queen Anne, Prince Charles and 28 powerful...

  7. AMORUM EMBLEMATA (Antwerp: H. Swingenius, 1608)
    (pp. 115-248)
    OTTO VAN VEEN

    Amorum Emblematawas published in 1608 in four different polyglot editions, only one of which contains English epigrams.¹ The same series of copperplates appears in all editions; that of the first emblem is signed by Cornelius Boel, a member of van Veen’s studio. The style being consistent throughout, it is assumed he also engraved the rest of van Veen’s designs onto the plates, though they are unsigned. In addition to the language of the epigrams changing from one edition to another (with only the Latin appearing in all editions), the preliminary dedications and commendatory verses also vary. The issue containing...

  8. CONCORDANCES, INDEXES, AND LISTS OF THE IMPRESE OF CAMDEN
    (pp. 249-275)
    Peter M. Daly
  9. CONCORDANCES, INDEXES, AND LISTS OF THE EMBLEMS OF H.G. MIRROUR
    (pp. 276-314)
    Peter M. Daly
  10. CONCORDANCES, INDEXES, AND LISTS OF THE EMBLEMS OF VAN VEEN
    (pp. 315-376)
    Peter M. Daly