Paraphrases on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Ephesians, Philippans, Colossians, and Thessalonians

Paraphrases on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Ephesians, Philippans, Colossians, and Thessalonians: Volume 43

edited by Robert D. Sider
Mechtilde O’Mara
Edward A. Phillips
Volume: 43
Copyright Date: 2009
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/9781442687226
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  • Book Info
    Paraphrases on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Ephesians, Philippans, Colossians, and Thessalonians
    Book Description:

    This volume provides the first complete English translations of these Paraphrases since 1549, in addition to excellent insight into the fundamentals of Erasmian theology, and includes annotations which highlight the historical and linguistic implications of Erasmus's original texts.

    eISBN: 978-1-4426-8722-6
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Preface
    (pp. ix-xiv)
    Robert D. Sider
  4. Translators’ Note
    (pp. xv-xxvi)
    Mechtilde T. O’Mara and Edward A. Phillips Jr
  5. PARAPHRASE ON FIRST CORINTHIANS Paraphrasis in epistolam Pauli ad Corinthios priorem
    (pp. 1-198)

    Often had I heard your Highness’ praises sung, both in letters from many correspondents and in conversation, as of a person richly endowed with every quality and every gift that could be thought worthy of a prince; but while enjoying a few days of your society³ I found you such that my friends seemed to have given a niggardly and stinted I would almost call it a jealous account of your felicity or (it would be truer to say) ours. And so the situation was reversed. You, who had long been fired by the kind words of several friends with...

  6. PARAPHRASE ON SECOND CORINTHIANS In epistolam Pauli ad Corinthios posteriorem paraphrasis
    (pp. 199-282)

    First of all he explains to the Corinthians why he had not visited them again as he had promised in his earlier letter.1 He prefaces this with some remarks about the afflictions he was suffering on account of the gospel of Christ, showing that in the midst of such great evils God had been his comfort.2 Next he restores to the Corinthians the individual he had, in his earlier letter, ordered to be handed over to Satan,3 so that they might lovingly receive back, chastened, the one whom they had expelled while he was sinning.4 These are, for the most...

  7. PARAPHRASE ON EPHESIANS Paraphrasis epistolae Pauli Apostoli ad Ephesios
    (pp. 283-356)

    Whenever I survey the mutability of human affairs, my lord Lorenzo,2 brightest ornament of the college of cardinals, I seem to see precisely some Euripus3 or whatever4 may be more inconstant than that, so incessant are the changes as affairs surge this way and that,5 up and down, and cannot long continue in one position. They reach6 a climax and swing back to what was left behind, until once more they come to such a point that we are obliged to turn away7 our course from some excess that has now become intolerable; and what is more, were one to...

  8. PARAPHRASE ON PHILIPPIANS Paraphrasis in epistolam Pauli Apostoli ad Philippenses
    (pp. 357-392)

    The Philippians dwell in the first region of Macedonia, as is described in the sixteenth chapter of Acts,¹ a Roman settlement established in the city of Philippi, named after Philip, its founder.² The capital of their province is Thessalonica. Since they had persevered in the faith once received,³ without admitting the false apostles to whom the Corinthians and Galatians gave ear, they are deservedly praised by the Apostle.⁴ Prompted by the Spirit,⁵ Paul had set out for the Philippians, then spent several days in their midst, not without trouble. For here Paul was lashed with scourges and, together with Silas,...

  9. PARAPHRASE ON COLOSSIANS In epistolam Pauli Apostoli ad Colossenses paraphrasis
    (pp. 393-432)

    The Colossians live in AsiaMinor, neighbours to the Laodiceans.1 The Apostle had not seen them,2 for they were converted to Christ by the preaching of Archippus, or, as Ambrose adds, of Epaphras,3 to whom this task had been assigned.4 They were being seriously menaced by false apostles attempting to seduce them into the worst possible dogma, for they were teaching that the Son of God was not the author of salvation, but that through the angels a path lay open to the Father.5 They alleged that the Son of God had not come into this world nor would he come...

  10. PARAPHRASE ON FIRST THESSALONIANS In epistolam Pauli Apostoli ad Thessalonicenses paraphrasis
    (pp. 433-458)

    Thessalonica is the capital of Macedonia;¹ hence also the district’s inhabitants are called Thessalonians. These people persevered with such great constancy in the faith once received,² that, following the example even of Paul, they endured persecutions from their fellow citizens with an unflagging and cheerful heart; and they could not be turned aside from their instruction³ in the gospel by any persuasion of false apostles. Having feared precisely this, and well aware of the wickedness of the false apostles, Paul sent Timothy⁴ to visit the Thessalonians because he was not himself able to visit them. When on Timothy’s return he...

  11. PARAPHRASE ON SECOND THESSALONIANS Paraphrasis in epistolam Pauli Apostoliad Thessalonicenses posteriorem
    (pp. 459-474)

    Since Paul did not have an opportunity of visiting the Thessalonians again,¹ he encourages them through an Epistle,² so that they may bravely endure sufferings inflicted on account of Christ: they will not fail to receive a reward, nor their adversaries punishment. Again, concerning the day of the Lord’s coming, on which he had touched to some extent in the earlier Epistle, he warns them not to be disturbed at all by the statements of certain people who were emphatically asserting that it was already upon them, secretly, as they imagine. He indicates that the Roman empire will have to...

  12. DEDICATORY LETTER [1520] TO CARDINAL CAMPEGGI
    (pp. 475-478)

    Whenever I survey the mutability of human affairs, most reverend Father, I seem to see precisely some Euripus, so incessant are the changes as affairs surge up and down and cannot long continue in one position. They reach a climax and swing back to what was left behind, until once more they come to such a point that we are obliged to turn back our course from some excess that has now become intolerable. And what is more, were one to try to stand against the sea or bend its course a different way, one could never do this without...

  13. THE SEQUENCE AND DATES OF THE PUBLI CATION OF THE PARAPHRASES
    (pp. 479-480)
  14. WORKS FREQUENTLY CITED
    (pp. 481-487)
  15. SHORT-TITLE FORMS FOR ERASMUS’ WORKS
    (pp. 488-492)
  16. Index of Scriptural References
    (pp. 493-502)
  17. Index of Classical References
    (pp. 503-504)
  18. Index of Patristic and Medieval References
    (pp. 505-506)
  19. Index of Greek and Latin Words Cited
    (pp. 507-515)
  20. General Index
    (pp. 516-538)