No Trespassing

No Trespassing: Authorship, Intellectual Property Rights, and the Boundaries of Globalization

EVA HEMMUNGS WIRTÉN
Copyright Date: 2004
Pages: 238
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/j.ctt1287qgv
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  • Book Info
    No Trespassing
    Book Description:

    No Trespassingis essential reading for all who care about culture and the future regulatory structures of access to it.

    eISBN: 978-1-4426-2089-6
    Subjects: Language & Literature, Law

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. ix-2)
  4. INTRODUCTION: THE PURSUIT OF PROPERTY
    (pp. 3-13)

    The sequence of events depicted in the pages that follow unfolds in late nineteenth-century Europe and is then traced up to today’s global, knowledge-based society. As I explore cultural ownership in a number of settings across both spatial and temporal divides, three overlapping interlocutory spheres serve as backdrop for my undertaking: authorship as one of the basic features of print culture;intellectual property rightsas the privileged instrument of control exercised over the multifarious resources produced by the first; and finallyglobalizationas the condition under which these two operate.

    Before concentrating on each category and their mutual interconnections, let...

  5. Chapter One WEARING THE PARISIAN HAT: CONSTRUCTING THE INTERNATIONAL AUTHOR
    (pp. 14-37)

    Our story first begins on 17 June 1878, the year of the Exposition Universelle. The scene is Paris, and more specifically one of the numerous conferences hosted by that city during the year in question: the Congrès Littéraire International. Initiated by the Société des gens de lettres de France,¹ the honour of delivering the inaugural speech is set aside for one man and one man only: Victor Hugo. Now, trying to pinpoint the exact beginnings of major historical trajectories to a precise date and location constitutes of course a hazardous enterprise. We all know that history is not made up...

  6. Chapter Two INVENTING F. DAVID: AUTHOR(ING) TRANSLATION
    (pp. 38-56)

    Victor Hugo’s spectacular international success was to some extent made possible by readers for whom the French language did not constitute an insurmountable linguistic obstacle. And yet, in the long run it would owe even more to another feature by which literature travels: translation.

    Spanning from vacuum-cleaner manuals to Nobel Prize winning poetry, translation is also one of the necessary components of the international conventions, recommendations, and agreements that govern its protection.¹ Despite its creative, financial, moral, and legal implications in the matrix of print culture, the question of how translation interacts with authorship in intellectual property rights has warranted...

  7. Chapter Three THE DEATH OF THE AUTHOR AND THE KILLING OF BOOKS: ASSAULT BY MACHINE
    (pp. 57-75)

    When it comes to intellectual property rights and copyright especially, the ability to reproduce, duplicate, and, of course, copy is a given, but far from uncontroversial, feature. Even translation, as we saw in the previous chapter, occupies the imagery of the derivative, a copy made from an original.¹ As something to be revered and later, feared, the act of copying is appropriately enough also part of the history of literature. Thus, material and immaterial changes go hand in hand: the meticulous transcription by hand taking place in convents and monasteries during the Middle Ages morphed into the mass production of...

  8. Chapter Four HOW CONTENT BECAME KING: ECONOMIES OF PRINT
    (pp. 76-99)

    If we transport ourselves outside the more immediate realm of the technological and textual, we can begin to discern another, less philosophical perhaps but equally influential arena bordering that of the previous one: the economic. There are several reasons why intellectual property catapults to the forefront of contemporary attention, but the most patently obvious and most tangible of all is by virtue of money, pure and simple. Based on three interrelated concepts – conglomeratization, content, and convergence – this chapter suggests a possible framework within which we can understand thisménage-à-troisas an expression of an increasingly powerful economics of intellectual property...

  9. Chapter Five FROM THE ‘INTELLECTUAL’ TO THE ‘CULTURAL’: CAN THERE BE PROPERTY WITH A ‘DIFFERENCE’?
    (pp. 100-124)

    ‘Only a challenge to the hierarchy ofsitesof discourse, which usually comes from groups and classes “situated” by the dominant in low or marginal positions,’ suggest Peter Stallybrass and Allon White inThe Politics and Poetics of Transgression, ‘carries the promise of politically transformative power.’¹ The following pages will mark a radical departure from the perspective deployed in the previous chapter. There, we witnessed the exhaustive penetration and impact of the media conglomerates, providing, through a demonstration of the alluringly familiar yet strikingly limited schema of relentless corporate domination, sufficient reason to expand the perimeters of this book in...

  10. Chapter Six GENIES IN BOTTLES AND BOTTLED-UP GENIUSES: TWO CASES OF UPSET RELATIVES AND A PUBLIC DOMAIN
    (pp. 125-148)

    This book began with Victor Hugo’s keynote address at the Congrès Littéraire International in Paris, 17 June 1878. Having now reached the final chapter, I would once more like to revisit that speech and event, not in order to recapitulate its basic tenets, but to introduce an element of Hugo’s discourse that I have so far largely avoided and that I believe needs to be considered in order to complete more fully the overall ambitions of this project. Rhetorically, Hugo remained on an abstractly grandiose level that day, setting the stage for the author as a chosen individual searching for...

  11. NOTES
    (pp. 149-190)
  12. REFERENCES
    (pp. 191-214)
  13. INDEX
    (pp. 215-224)
  14. Back Matter
    (pp. 225-225)