Critical Issues Editing Exploration Text

Critical Issues Editing Exploration Text

Edited by Germaine Warkentin
Copyright Date: 1995
Pages: 166
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/j.ctt130jvng
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  • Book Info
    Critical Issues Editing Exploration Text
    Book Description:

    The papers in this collection deal with a cultural problem central to the study of the history of exploration: the editing and transmission of the texts in which explorers relate their experiences.

    eISBN: 978-1-4426-2357-6
    Subjects: Language & Literature, Sociology, Anthropology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. ix-xiv)
    Germaine Warkentin

    The papers assembled in this twenty-eighth volume of proceedings of the Conference on Editorial Problems deal with a topic — exploration writing — which would have been treated very differently had it been addressed in our first conference in 1965. Indeed, each of them, from one perspective or another, makes that difference its subject of study. I refer of course to the translation of the study of exploration history and its writings from the genres of national epic and/or scientific reportage, to those of cultural analysis. This process, already in progress in the decade before the commemoration of the Columbus Quincentenary in...

  5. TRACTABLE TEXTS: MODERN EDITING AND THE COLUMBIAN WRITINGS
    (pp. 1-35)
    David Henige

    Fresh from theSturm und Drangthat have marked the Quincentenary, it might seem inevitable that detailed knowledge of, and interest Columbus’s activities have existed uninterruptedly virtually since they occurred. Neither is the case — the former emphatically not. In own time, knowledge of Columbus’s achievements was confined largely to what he — aided and abetted, it seems, by the Spanish court chose to make known in the famous Letter of Discovery, which was published rapidly and widely on his return.² Passing comments on the first and succeeding voyages appeared in Peter Martyr’s rather anecdotal account of the first discoveries, as well...

  6. EDITING ITALIAN SOURCES FOR THE HISTORY OF EXPLORATION
    (pp. 36-52)
    Luciano Formisano

    Editing exploration texts does not, in my view, demand special editorial policies. This does not mean that, generally speaking, the nature of the text cannot affect the editorial practice; on the contrary, I hope that the few examples I am going to discuss will show how important exploration literature may be from a methodological point of view. Nevertheless, as far as editorial criteria are concerned, the genre to which a text belongs is less important than its textual tradition; in any case, the correspondence between literary genre and textual transmission cannot be an axiom. In this sense, exploration texts and...

  7. THE EDITING OF RICHARD HAKLUYT’S “DISCOURSE OF WESTERN PLANTING”
    (pp. 53-66)
    Alison Quinn and D. B.

    The treatise, “A particuler discourse concerninge ... the westerne discoveries lately attempted,” is a document offering a number of problems which differentiate it from other Elizabethan documents on colonization. In the first place, it exists in only a single copy, and, although this is contemporary, it is not the original. That was presented by its author Richard Hakluyt to Queen Elizabeth on 6 October 1584¹ and was never seen or found referred to thereafter for nearly two centuries. The Reverend Richard Hakluyt, when he wrote it, was a Student (i. e. a Fellow) of Christ Church, Oxford, but he was...

  8. THE METAMORPHOSIS OF TRAVELLERS INTO AUTHORS: THE CASE OF PAUL KANE
    (pp. 67-107)
    I. S. MacLaren

    Paul Kane was a Canadian documentary painter of some renown who left little in the way of a written record, though the little he left is very important writing nonetheless. In 1859,Wanderings of an Artist among the Indians of North America¹ appeared in London over Kane’s name, eleven years after he had returned to Toronto from more than two years of travels with Hudson’s Bay Company brigades to the Winnipeg River, the prairies, the Rockies, almost the entire length of the Columbia River, the fledgling Oregon settlement, a smoking Mount St. Helen’s, Puget Sound, and Vancouver Island. In this...

  9. THE GREAT PUBLICATION SOCIETIES
    (pp. 108-124)
    Helen Wallis

    Of the great publication societies treating texts of exploration and discovery, the earliest to be founded and the most important to my discussion here was the Hakluyt Society. It is appropriate that the geographical writer William Desborough Cooley, a founder and Vice-President of the Royal Geographical Society, chose Hakluyt’s name for the society which he founded in London on 15 December 1846. In thePrincipall Navigations(London, 1589) Richard Hakluyt had set out to publish “the maritime record of our own men.” His expandedPrincipal Navigations,published in three volumes from 1598-1600, was conceived on a larger compass to include...

  10. A DOUBLE TRADITION: EDITING BOOK TWELVE OF THE FLORENTINE CODEX
    (pp. 125-148)
    James Lockhart

    When Europeans first came on the scene, most or all of the peoples of the Western Hemisphere possessed a well developed, multifaceted cultural lore and elaborate forms for expressing that lore. Few indeed, however, had writing traditions. Only the Mesoamericans, essentially the peoples of what is now central and southern Mexico and Guatemala, put records on paper with ink. Of these, only the lowland Maya had ever reproduced whole running sentences of inflected words, and it appears that by the sixteenth century even they no longer practiced the art to the extent they had in earlier times. In the great...

  11. MEMBERS OF THE CONFERENCE
    (pp. 149-150)
  12. Back Matter
    (pp. 151-152)