Canadian Population and Northern Colonization

Canadian Population and Northern Colonization

EDITED BY V. W. BLADEN
Series: Heritage
Copyright Date: 1962
Pages: 158
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/j.ctt15jjf7v
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  • Book Info
    Canadian Population and Northern Colonization
    Book Description:

    In 1961 the Royal Society annual session topic was an especially vital issue, the population explosion, and this volume, based on the papers given at the meeting, has much valuable information and many pertinent and provocative comments on this phenomenon particularly as it affects Canada.

    eISBN: 978-1-4426-3209-7
    Subjects: Population Studies, History, Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. PREFACE
    (pp. v-viii)
    V. W. Bladen
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. PART I: CANADIAN DEMOGRAPHY
    • CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF THE POPULATION INCREASE
      (pp. 3-13)
      Thomas W. M. Cameron

      Perhaps the most important consequence of the establishment of Evolution as a doctrine was the acceptance of man as a member of the animal kingdom—a rather recent and somewhat primitive mammal, both physiologically and physically, with, however, a great development of its brain. This gave man a mental advantage because of the extent of his intelligence and his ability to communicate with his fellows. Nevertheless, he has remained biological rather than logical in his actions and he is guided much more by instinct than by reason. Thinking for most men is at best an intermittent process and is employed...

    • LE PROBLÈME DE LA POPULATION AU CANADA
      (pp. 14-19)
      Pierre Dagenais

      « Qu’on le veuille ou non, la poussée démographique arrache la nation canadienne à ses amarres. » Ainsi s’exprimait, en 1956, le rapporteur de la Commission royale d’enquête Gordon sur les perspectives économiques du Canada, après avoir constaté l’accélération du rythme d’accroissement de notre population depuis la fin de la deuxième guerre mondiale. On pouvait alors se questionner sur la durée de cette manifestation de vitalité et par suite sur l’amplitude de ses effets dans la vie économique et sociale du pays. Depuis lors, cinq ans se sont écoulés et le comportement de la population ne fait que confirmer l’affirmation...

    • LA MAIN-D’ŒUVRE CANADIENNE
      (pp. 20-26)
      Guy Rocher

      Je me propose, dans le cadre de ces exposés, d’aborder un aspect bien délimité de l’évolution de la population canadienne, à savoir celui de l’évolution de la population au travail. Ce n’est là qu’une partie de l’ensemble du tableau que présente l’histoire de la population canadienne, mais c’est une partie qui concerne une portion assez importante de la population, c’est-à-dire au moins la moitié. Au surplus, nous verrons qu’à partir de l’analyse de la population au travail se posent des questions fondamentales sur l’évolution de l’ensemble de notre société canadienne.

      Lorsqu’on parle de population au travail, on entend depuis quelques...

    • ÉVOLUTION DE LA COMPOSITION ETHNIQUE ET LINGUISTIQUE DE LA POPULATION CANADIENNE
      (pp. 27-32)
      Jacques Henripin

      La composition ethnique et linguistique de la population canadienne est un sujet sérieux et délicat; il s’agit là de caractères qui ont une influence profonde sur le comportement des individus, de même que sur les institutions et, d’autre part, on ne saurait se cacher que la plupart des Canadiens sont assez sensibles aux modifications qui peuvent intervenir dans l’importance relative de chacun de ces groupes ethniques ou linguistiques.

      Ces circonstances ne m’ont cependant pas convaincu de m’abstenir de faire certaines perspectives, même si mes calculs sont loin d’être aussi prudents ou raffinés qu’ils pourraient l’être. Et je m’excuse à l’avance...

    • NEW PATTERNS IN THE BIRTH RATE
      (pp. 33-42)
      Nathan Keyfitz

      Between the 1870’s and the 1940’s the birth rate showed certain trends and differentials so consistently that these seemed to be a universal law: that progress in any country or region results in steadily diminishing numbers of children, and at any given moment the birth rate must be especially low for the people who are better off, more educated, and more urban than for those who do not have these advantages; the constant prospect for the future was that the remaining poor would have children and the rich would choose to apply their wealth to getting richer. When population problems...

    • THE GROWTH OF POPULATION IN CANADA
      (pp. 43-68)
      Arthur R. M. Lower

      Modern man is a measuring animal: he measures most things (except his own individual self) from the small particles to the universe itself. He no longer merely guesses at the age of the earth, but daily comes closer to ascertaining it. He is making a more and more precise chart of the evolution of his own species. He no longer is content with “Old Stone Ages” and “New Stone Ages” but must have their divisions and geographical diffusions. He measures man’s increasing control over his environment, over animals and plants, and can tell us within a few decades when the...

  5. PART II: POSSIBILITIES OF COLONIZATION OF NORTHERN CANADA
    • INTRODUCTION
      (pp. 71-72)
      René Pomerleau

      Canada is one of the largest countries of the world but most of its population lives and thrives in a comparatively narrow strip along its southern border. The remainder is almost empty, with the exception of a few scattered oases. For a long time, only those who were searching for the Northwest Passage, or the whalers and fur traders were brave enough to travel in these hostile regions. During the last quarter of the nineteenth century the systematic exploration of the north was initiated mainly for the purpose of reaching the North Pole, but since the turn of the century...

    • THE RÔLE OF MINERAL RESOURCES IN THE DEVELOPMENT AND COLONIZATION OF NORTHERN CANADA
      (pp. 73-117)
      W. Keith Buck and J. F. Henderson

      The development and colonization of the Canadian north will depend in the future, as in the past, mainly on the development of its non-renewable resources of metals and mineral fuels. Any forecast as to when and to what extent this development will take place must be based on the potential mineral resources of northern Canada and the demand or market for these resources to provide the incentive to search out and develop them.

      Three years ago at the meeting of the Royal Society in Edmonton a symposium was held on “The Canadian Northwest: Its Potentialities.” One contribution was a paper...

    • POSSIBILITIES OF LIGHT AND HEAT FROM ATOMIC ENERGY AND OTHER SOURCES
      (pp. 118-124)
      E. W. Humphrys

      Apart from technical considerations, which must not be minimized, the possibility of light and heat, or power, in the general sense, being derived from atomic or nuclear energy is a question of economics as compared with conventional sources of energy, i.e., fossil fuels and hydroelectric power. The present appeal of the use of atomic energy for northern communities is based on the fact that the problem of fuel supply would virtually be eliminated and consequently fuel costs would be minimized. In northern Canada the major sources of energy for light, heat, and power currently are oil and hydroelectric power. Oil...

    • THE LIVING RESOURCES OF NORTHERN CANADA
      (pp. 125-135)
      M. J. Dunbar

      At the 1958 meeting of the Royal Society a symposium was presented on the Potentialities of the Canadian Northwest, an area defined as including the northern halves of the Prairie Provinces and British Columbia, the Yukon, and the Northwest Territories west of Hudson Bay. The present discussion is concerned only with the northern part of this region, and with the country to the east of the area of the 1958 symposium, the eastern arctic and subarctic, in which the isotherms sink down far to the south, and in which there is much more salt water. “Northern Canada” is regarded as...

    • MAN IN THE NORTH
      (pp. 136-147)
      G. Malcolm Brown

      Man is in many respects a tropical animal, and it is natural to ask if he can live in the far north. The answer is that, of course he can, if he is willing to pay the price. The price is first of all the price of the micro-climate he must take with him and in which he will largely confine himself, the price of heated shelter and clothing both in economic terms and in terms of restricted mobility and diminished dexterity. There is the price of the lack of amenities, the enforced idleness at certain periods, the loneliness of...

    • THE FUTURE COLONIZATION OF NORTHERN CANADA
      (pp. 148-158)
      Trevor Lloyd

      When seeking to draw conclusions concerning the large-scale colonization of northern Canada it is important to keep in mind the extent and character of the region we are discussing. The North is vast in area, just how vast it is not easy to appreciate unless one has travelled it on the ground as did Camsell, Tyrrell, and Low and not a few veteran Fellows of the Royal Society of Canada. Its scale may be illustrated by a circle centred on Montreal and passing through Alert at the northern end of Ellesmere Island. It also passes through the delta of the...