Conference on Statistics 1960

Conference on Statistics 1960

E. F. BEACH
J. C. WELDON
Series: Heritage
Copyright Date: 1962
Pages: 314
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/j.ctt15jvxnv
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  • Book Info
    Conference on Statistics 1960
    Book Description:

    A collection of eight papers given at the first Conference of the Canadian Political Science Association at Queen's University are contained in this volume. Diverse alike in subject and statistical method, the papers as printed incorporate the discussion that attended their presentation in 1960.

    eISBN: 978-1-4426-5668-0
    Subjects: Sociology, Business, Economics

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. v-vi)
    G. Rosenbluth

    In 1958 the Canadian Political Science Association established a Committee on Statistics to investigate ways and means of improving the facilities for research in the social sciences involving the use of statistics. Members of the Committee were G. Rosenbluth (Chairman), D. Hartle (Secretary), K. A. H. Buckley, M. C. Kemp, J. Porter, W. Smith, and M. C. Urquhart.

    The Conference on Statistics is one of the projects launched by this Committee. The group’s discussions and inquiries suggested that statistical research in Canada would be encouraged and improved by the establishment of a forum for the presentation and discussion of findings....

  3. EDITORS’ PREFACE
    (pp. vii-viii)
    E. F. Beach and J. C. Weldon
  4. Table of Contents
    (pp. ix-xii)
  5. HISTORICAL ESTIMATES OF INTERNAL MIGRATION IN CANADA
    (pp. 1-38)
    Kenneth Buckley

    The point of departure for any current investigation of population redistribution in Canada is the study “The Growth of Canadian Population” by Nathan Keyfitz. (1) By applying life-table survival ratios to the population distributed by age and sex at each census date, Keyfitz provides systematic intercensal estimates of the natural increase and net migration of the national population aged 10 and over from 1851 to 1941. He also obtained intercensal estimates of net migration between provinces by age and sex from 1881 on. Thus the method yields a distribution by age and sex of net interprovincial migration although this detail...

  6. THE “MASS SOCIETY” AND “COMMUNITY” ANALYSES OF THE SOCIAL PRESENT
    (pp. 39-72)
    Richard E. Du Wors, Robert Batson and Margaret Daffron

    The bibliography of the “mass society” contains comment by theologians, philosophers, social scientists, literary critics, journalists and by practically anyone who writes anything about the social present. (1) In these writings the mass society is condemned, usually; praised seldom, and then only in the name of democracy. (2) The research men and commentators whose work forms this bibliography find earlier and earlier sources from which the mass society is said to originate. William Foote Whyte prefers de Tocqueville’s description of the mass society as de Tocqueville conceived it in 1835(3); Professor Du Wors suggests that Wirth’s description of the present...

  7. CANADIAN CRIMINAL STATISTICS
    (pp. 73-106)
    P. J. Giffen

    The purpose of this paper is to make explicit some of the more important differences in rates and types of crime between provinces and between categories of people in Canada that can be calculated from the statistics on crime and delinquency published by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. The discussion will be confined to comparisons at the present period of time; the assessment of historical changes involves special problems of judgment that deserve treatment in a separate paper. The mundane task of revealing some of the apparent differences in crime between social categories and indicating other calculations that might be...

  8. THE POST-WAR RISE OF THE CRUDE PETROLEUM INDUSTRY IN CANADA
    (pp. 107-136)
    E. J. Hanson

    During the postwar years the world consumption of crude oil has expanded rapidly. In 1959 it exceeded seven billion barrels, about two and a half times the 1946 level. Rapid industrialization, war reconstruction programmes, relatively high investment costs involved in adding to coal and water-power output capacity, and a phenomenal rise in proven world crude oil reserves have been joint factors inducing the large postwar increases in consumption. Various projections point to a world consumption as high as eleven billion barrels in 1968 and fifteen billion barrels by 1975. (1) The annual world production of energy has approximately trebled since...

  9. SALARIES OF ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS, 1951
    (pp. 137-182)
    Gideon Rosenbluth

    The main object of this paper is to investigate the influence of various factors making for inequality of salary within a salaried professional occupation in the field of engineering and science. The investigation also throws some light, however, on the sources of inequality of salary between professional occupations.

    In the great majority of discussions, problems of this kind are investigated by presenting tables showing how average or median salaries vary with years of experience, how they vary by region, and so forth, taking in turn each of the factors on which statistics are available. It is generally recognized that the...

  10. THE DISTRIBUTION AND FUNCTIONS OF CANADIAN ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS
    (pp. 183-216)
    David N. Solomon and Agnes M. Fergusson

    During the past decade or so, especially in the United States, but also in Canada, the United Kingdom, and elsewhere, there has been a great increase in the importance attributed to science in general and more particularly to the application of science to practical affairs. In industry, government, and probably also the universities, the numbers of engineers and scientists and of establishments concerned with the application of science have greatly increased. There has been considerable interest in problems of supply and demand, that is, in assessing the capability of our educational system to produce sufficient numbers of specialized personnel to...

  11. THE STRUCTURE AND GROWTH OF THE CANADIAN AIR TRANSPORT INDUSTRY
    (pp. 217-294)
    K. W. Studnicki-Gizbert

    The study of air transport industry in Canada provides an interesting case history in the development of a new industry, whose growth was largely determined by the development of a new technology as well as by the economic growth of the country, and in particular by the growth of the resource industries. It also provides a case study in the general field of economic regulation and monopoly.

    The data relating to the development of air transport industry are quite extensive, especially during the more recent period. The full utilization, however, of the potentially available data has been handicapped by the...

  12. THE CANADIAN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY, 1900-1957
    (pp. 295-314)
    T. R. Vout

    Today the manufacturing industry is the most important sector of the Canadian economy. Its contribution to employment, income, exports and capital investment is not matched by any other sector. In 1957 domestic manufacturing industries accounted for about one-quarter of the nation’s workers, 28 per cent of gross domestic product, about two-thirds of total Canadian exports, and absorbed one-sixth of the nation’s total spending on capital facilities.

    This pre-eminence of the manufacturing industry in the Canadian economy is, however, of fairly recent origin. At the turn of the century and for some years after, agriculture was Canada’s chief source of employment...