Writings on India

Writings on India

JOHN STUART MILL
JOHN M. ROBSON
MARTIN MOIR
ZAWAHIR MOIR
Introduction by MARTIN MOIR
Textual Introduction by JOHN M. ROBSON
Volume: 30
Copyright Date: 1990
Pages: 336
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/j.ctt2ttfxh
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  • Book Info
    Writings on India
    Book Description:

    This volume offers the first opportunity for a fill assessment of Mill's contribution, including as it does the first reprinting of the essays, parliamentary evidence, and pamphlets, and adding an appendix of an annotated record and location of his despatches.

    eISBN: 978-1-4426-8083-8
    Subjects: Philosophy

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. East India House in Mill’s Time
    (pp. vi-vi)
  4. Introduction
    (pp. vii-liv)
    MARTIN MOIR

    Thus in hisAutobiographyJohn Stuart Mill tersely and modestly sums up his long period of employment in the Examiner’s Office of the East India Company. To this factual resumé he later adds a few remarks on the increase in his official responsibilities that took place towards the end of his career.² More tantalizingly, he also includes some brief observations on the benefits and occasional limitations of his employment. For example, as a “theoretical reformer of the opinions and the institutions of his time,” he appreciated the useful insight into “the practical conduct of public affairs” which his Company experience...

  5. Textual Introduction
    (pp. lv-lviii)
    JOHN M. ROBSON

    Of mill’s fourteen published writings on India, eight appeared in anonymous pamphlet form, all in connection with the legislation of 1858 that transferred to the Crown all the affairs of the East India Company. These exist only in the one printed version, except for “The Petition of the East India Company,” which also appeared inParliamentary Debates.Two other items, “John Stuart Mill, Esq., Is Called in and Examined” (1852), and “Letter from the Chairman and Deputy Chairman of the Honourable East India Company to the President of the Board of Control” (in connection with the legislation of 1858), were...

  6. TRADE WITH INDIA (1828)
    (pp. 1-10)

    On the 15th may,* Mr. Wolryche Whitmore moved for a Committee to inquire into the trade between Great Britain and India. Mr. Whitmore rested his demand for investigation upon a specification of grievances; among which he insisted chiefly upon the inequality of the duties on East India and on West India produce; the impediments which, as he affirmed, the East India Company were accused of throwing in the way of private merchants trading to the East Indies; and lastly, the commercial restrictions, which he seemed to suppose existed at Singapore, and other “emporia in the Eastern Archipelago.”¹

    On the first...

  7. MINUTE ON THE BLACK ACT (1836)
    (pp. 11-16)

    The petitioners pray that cases of marriage, divorce, and inheritance or succession, respecting Englishmen, should be removed altogether from the Company’s Courts, and that in all other civil cases (viz. debt, contract or trespass) wherein Englishmen are affected either as plaintiffs or defendants, an appeal should lie to the Sudder Adawlut or to the Supreme Court, at the option of the appellant.

    The first of these prayers might without impropriety be complied with if the English inhabitants really wish it; because the marriages and divorces of the English, and the succession to their property, cannot in any way affect the...

  8. PENAL CODE FOR INDIA (1838)
    (pp. 17-30)

    It has been for some time, we suspect, the opinion of all who have paid much attention to thevexata quaestioof codification, that, from a question of Theory, it has now passed into one of Practice. The possibility of making a code (for the possibility only, and not the advantage, was contested) has long since been as well proved as words can prove it, and can only be made more evident by actually trying todothat which, until done, the world will never believecanbe done, at least well enough to be worth doing. And such, in...

  9. THE EAST INDIA COMPANY’S CHARTER (1852)
    (pp. 31-74)

    What connexionhave you had with the Government of India?I am one of the assistants to the Examiner of Indian Correspondence, in whose office the greater part of the correspondence with India relating to the Government is conducted.

    For what length of time have you been in that office?Since the year 1823, and nearly the whole of that time in the Correspondence Department; in fact, I may say the whole of it.

    Have you been exclusively in that department, or in others also?Exclusively in that department.

    Have we reason, do you think, on the whole, to feel...

  10. THE PETITION OF THE EAST-INDIA COMPANY (1858)
    (pp. 75-90)

    To the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and the Honourable the Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, in Parliament assembled,

    aHumbly sheweth,

    Thatayour Petitioners, at their own expense, and by the agency of their own civil and military servants, originally acquired for this country its magnificent empire in the East.

    That the foundations of this empire were laid by your Petitioners, at that time neither aided nor controlled by Parliament, at the same period at which a succession of administrations under the control of Parliament were losing to the Crown of Great Britain...

  11. MEMORANDUM OF THE IMPROVEMENTS IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF INDIA DURING THE LAST THIRTY YEARS (1858)
    (pp. 91-160)

    At this time, when a calamity unexampled in the history of British India has excited an unusual amount of interest in Indian affairs, while the statements publicly made, and the opinions expressed, concerning the administration of the Indian Government, strikingly manifest the deficiency of correct information on the subject; a brief survey of the principal measures which have been of late adopted for improving the internal government of the country, and the physical and mental condition of its inhabitants, may be serviceable in removing false impressions, and in supplying materials for a deliberate judgment.

    It may be thought that this...

  12. REPORT TO THE GENERAL COURT OF PROPRIETORS, DRAWING ATTENTION TO THE TWO BILLS NOW BEFORE PARLIAMENT RELATING TO THE GOVERNMENT OF INDIA (1858)
    (pp. 161-172)

    It is the duty of your Directors to lay before the Proprietors the two Bills which have been introduced into Parliament by the late and by the present Ministry, for divesting the East-India Company of all participation in the government of India, and framing a new scheme of administrative agency.¹

    On former occasions when the Ministers of the Crown have submitted measures to Parliament for altering, in any manner, the constitution of the Indian Government, the substance of the measures has been officially communicated to the Court of Directors, and an opportunity allowed to them of offering such remarks as...

  13. A CONSTITUTIONAL VIEW OF THE INDIA QUESTION (1858)
    (pp. 173-178)

    The proposal to extinguish the East-India Company,¹ and to place the whole administration of India in the hands of a Minister and a Council, without any substantial power, is an ominous advance in that centralisation of all the functions of Government in the hands of the Cabinet, so justly deprecated by the soundest thinkers, whether of Liberal or Conservative opinions.

    Next to a national representation, the most important of all political principles is, that the only affairs directly administered by the Imperial Government should be the general affairs of the nation; and that all local affairs, whether they be those...

  14. OBSERVATIONS ON THE PROPOSED COUNCIL OF INDIA (1858)
    (pp. 179-184)

    The house of commons has virtually decided that the home administration of India shall be carried on by a Minister of the Crown with the assistance of a Council.

    It is still to be determined in what manner the Council shall be composed.

    The three principal leaders of sections in Parliament, have proposed as many different plans for the composition of the Council.

    Lord Derby proposes that it should be partly nominated by the Minister, and partly elected by a constituency.¹

    Lord Palmerston proposes that it should be wholly nominated by the Minister, and that each member should hold office...

  15. PRACTICAL OBSERVATIONS ON THE FIRST TWO OF THE PROPOSED RESOLUTIONS ON THE GOVERNMENT OF INDIA (1858)
    (pp. 185-192)

    From the terms of this resolution it might be supposed that the renewal of the Company’s powers in 1853 was a mere temporary arrangement, and that the phrase “until Parliament should otherwise provide,”¹ was the expression of an intention on the part of Parliament to provide otherwise, at some not remote period. But this is not the fact. As is well known, the words were only used to show that the powers of the Company were renewed for an indefinite period, and not, as on former occasions, for a definite period of twenty years.

    It is no peculiarity of the...

  16. THE MORAL OF THE INDIA DEBATE (1858)
    (pp. 193-198)

    The proceedings at home, consequent on Lord Canning’s proclamation,¹ have a most important bearing on the intended changes in the mode of administering India. They are a timely warning, how a Minister governs India, when he is under no check but responsibility to Parliament, and how Parliamentary responsibility, when really enforced, is likely to work.

    In writing his despatch, Lord Ellenborough was in the position, in which the Minister for India will always be, under the proposed new constitutions.² He was without a Council: or rather, he passed over his Council. The despatch was in the Secret Department, that is...

  17. A PRESIDENT IN COUNCIL THE BEST GOVERNMENT FOR INDIA (1858)
    (pp. 199-204)

    There are two political functions devolving on the British nation. It has to provide for its own government; and for the government of the much more extensive and populous countries which are dependent on it.

    The majority however of its dependencies it has, wisely and necessarily, divested itself of the duty of governing; having found, after long trial, that it was unable to govern them satisfactorily. The only great outlying possession of the British Crown which is not now left substantially to its own government, is India.

    The question is, in what manner Great Britain can best provide for the...

  18. LETTER FROM THE EAST INDIA COMPANY TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF CONTROL (1858)
    (pp. 205-212)

    My lord,

    1. Although the Bill which has been newly brought in by Her Majesty’s Ministers “for the better government of India”¹ has not yet been formally communicated to the Court of Directors, the Court, influenced by the desire which they have already expressed to give all aid in their power towards rendering the scheme of government which it is the pleasure of Parliament to substitute for the East India Company as efficient for its purposes as possible, have requested us to lay before your Lordship, and through you before Her Majesty’s Government, a few observations on some portions of the...

  19. MAINE ON VILLAGE COMMUNITIES (1871)
    (pp. 213-228)

    This book is an important contribution to a branch of knowledge in which the author is as yet unrivalled—the philosophy of the history of institutions. It pursues into ulterior developments (at least in one great department, that of property) the line of research and speculation so brilliantly commenced inAncient Law: its Connection with the Early History of Society, and its Relation to Modern Ideas.¹ It is superfluous at this time of day to say anything either in the way of information or of recommendation, concerning a treatise which has already become classical; but we may remark that its...

  20. Facsimiles
    (pp. 231-238)
  21. Appendix A. Check List of Mill’s Indian Despatches (1823-58)
    (pp. 239-296)
  22. Appendix B. List of Published Extracts from Mill’s Indian Despatches
    (pp. 297-308)
  23. Appendix C. Editorial Emendations
    (pp. 309-310)
  24. Appendix D. Index of Persons, and Works Cited, with Variants and Notes
    (pp. 311-332)
  25. Index
    (pp. 333-336)