Cdn Annual Review 1973

Cdn Annual Review 1973

EDITED BY JOHN SAYWELL
Copyright Date: 1974
Pages: 363
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/j.ctt2tth5s
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  • Book Info
    Cdn Annual Review 1973
    Book Description:

    Featured in this edition are a review of the crucial Quebec provincial election in which the Parti quebecois went down to decisive defeat on a platform of independence, an overview of Canada's reponse to the Chilean coup, and an outline of government attempts to deal with the growing inflation and with the oil shortage.

    eISBN: 978-1-4426-7187-4
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-viii)
  3. Contributors
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. Canadian Calendar
    (pp. xi-xiv)
  5. Parliament and Politics
    (pp. 3-100)
    PAUL STEVENS and JOHN SAYWELL

    Despite an impressive expenditure of political energy, most of the problems confronting the Canadian government at the turn of the year seemed as formidable as they had been twelve months earlier. The modern riddle of high unemployment combined with continuing inflation remained unresolved. The ongoing debate in Quebec over the province’s role in confederation and the growing resentment in the western provinces over the government’s alleged preoccupation with central Canada were just as menacing. And the irritants of the country’s relationship with the United States continued to cause considerable concern. The complicating factor was the parliamentary situation. Whether solutions could...

  6. The Provinces
    (pp. 103-218)
    PETER OLIVER, JEAN-CHARLES BONENFANT, DUNCAN FRASER, RICHARD WILBUR, TOM PETERSON, NEIL A. SWAINSON, FRANK MACKINNON, DUFF SPAFFORD, MARIAN McKENNA, LESLIE HARRIS and NORA T. CORLEY

    In 1973, as Ontario Tories quietly celebrated their thirtieth anniversary in office and the Davis government reached the midpoint of its term, the outstanding issues were energy policy, land-use planning, and urban transportation. Although the old problems of spiralling health and education costs persisted, the much-troubled regional government programme reached a plateau and promised to assume a lower profile in the future. The session, which began on March 20, recessed June 22, resumed October 2, and closed December 20, saw a few new initiatives and a good deal of housekeeping legislation. A series of mishaps and miscalculations tarnished the Davis...

  7. External Affairs and Defence
    (pp. 221-290)
    R.B. BYERS

    In many respects, 1973 was a disquieting year for most participants in the international system, and the Canadian government found it could not divorce itself from the impact of the international environment. The desire of the Trudeau administration to base foreign policy decisions on an assessment of domestic concerns and priorities proved to be impossible in a number of instances. Canadian participation on the Vietnam peace force, the war in the Middle East, disputes between the United States and Western Europe, doubts over détente, Watergate, and most specifically the world energy crisis, all had their impact on government policy and...

  8. The National Economy
    (pp. 293-342)
    FRED LAZAR

    As the year began, unemployment was the chief economic problem confronting the government. By the end of the year it was running a poor third, after inflation and an energy crisis. Ironically, the change in economic importance and in policy-focus from unemployment to inflation, provided all three political parties with some good news during the year. The Liberals could point to the strong expansion of the economy, the most rapid rate of growth in about two decades, and the resulting decline in the unemployment rate, to below 6 per cent for the first time in four years, as signs that...

  9. Obituaries
    (pp. 343-348)
  10. Acknowledgments
    (pp. 349-350)
    JTS
  11. Index
    (pp. 351-363)