Cdn Annual Review 1977

Cdn Annual Review 1977

EDITED BY JOHN SAYWELL
Copyright Date: 1979
Pages: 392
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/j.ctt2tts4w
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Cdn Annual Review 1977
    Book Description:

    The 1977 edition of theCanadian Annual Reviewis both a concise, convenient record of the year but a responsible appraisal of important developments.

    eISBN: 978-1-4426-7191-1
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-viii)
  3. Contributors
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. Canadian Calendar
    (pp. xi-xvi)
  5. Parliament and Politics
    (pp. 3-116)
    TOM TRAVES and JOHN SAYWELL

    ‘Given the new economic realities to which Canada must adjust, and the urgency of promoting linguistic and cultural harmony, it is readily apparent that Canada is now entering a new era,’ the prime minister told the country in the October 18 throne speech. ‘It can be an era of increasing confrontation, tension and division, or an era of enhanced freedom, co-operation and unity of purpose. Fundamentally, the choice must be made by every citizen every day.’ There were few outspoken advocates of confrontation, tension, or division, but there were many who felt that the road to the new era had...

  6. The Provinces
    (pp. 119-238)
    PETER OLIVER, RENÉ DUROCHER, DUNCAN FRASER, RICHARD WILBUR, MURRAY DONNELLY, ALAN F.J. ARTIBISE, FRANK MACKINNON, JOHN C. COURTNEY, DAVID K. ELTON, LESLIE HARRIS and NORA T. CORLEY

    A June 9 election which saw the ruling Tories fail in their bid to regain the majority they had lost in 1975 was the political highlight of the year, but two other concerns, the state of the economy and the future of confederation, neither of which came to a very satisfactory focus in the June balloting, remained in the foreground.

    With a spring election a strong possibility, Premier Davis on February 3 shuffled his cabinet by elevating Keith Norton, a 35-year-old lawyer from Kingston and the Islands, to the portfolio of Community and Social Services and moving James Taylor, who...

  7. External Affairs and Defence
    (pp. 241-306)
    DAVID LEYTON-BROWN

    Canadian relations with the United States were complex but basically cordial. The closeness of the relationship was symbolized by Prime Minister Trudeau’s address to Congress. Successful conclusion of an agreement to construct a northern pipeline illustrated the ability of the two countries to co-operate on a continental basis. The major unresolved issue during the year dealt with maritime boundary disputes resulting from the declaration of 200-mile fishing zones in each country. The major global initiative was Canada’s support for a United Nations arms embargo against South Africa and the introduction of unilateral trade sanctions against that country. Canada moderated its...

  8. The National Economy
    (pp. 309-352)
    FRED LAZAR

    The year was an unmitigated economic disaster for the federal government. The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate rose almost continually from 7.5 per cent in December 1976 to 8.5 per cent at the end of 1977. The numbers of unemployed also increased almost regularly from month to month, so that by the end of the year the seasonally adjusted number of unemployed stood at 911,000, an increase of 131,000 in one year. These sharply higher unemployment rates were accompanied by, and were partly the result of, a rather dramatic slowing down in the real growth of the economy. On average during...

  9. Obituaries
    (pp. 353-358)
  10. Acknowledgments
    (pp. 359-360)
    JTS
  11. Index
    (pp. 361-375)