Cdn Annual Review 1971

Cdn Annual Review 1971

EDITED BY JOHN SAYWELL
Copyright Date: 1972
Pages: 390
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/j.ctt2ttv6r
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  • Book Info
    Cdn Annual Review 1971
    Book Description:

    TheCanadian Annual Reviewhas become an indispensable reference book for those concerned directly or indirectly with Canadian public affairs.

    eISBN: 978-1-4426-7185-0
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Preface
    (pp. v-vi)
    John Saywell
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-x)
  4. Contributors
    (pp. xi-xii)
  5. Canadian Calendar
    (pp. xiii-xvi)
  6. Parliament and Politics

    • Parliament and Politics
      (pp. 3-98)
      PAUL STEVENS and JOHN SAYWELL

      A mood of uncertainty hung over the 28th Parliament as it prepared to resume its third session after a three-week Christmas adjournment. Government leaders were cautiously hopeful that members would complete their work by the end of June. Others, however, were less optimistic. From the agenda of sixty-eight bills outlined in the speech from the throne (see canadian annual review for 1970, pp. 163–8), the government had yet to introduce over thirty, including Finance Minister Edgar Benson’s long-awaited proposals for tax reform. Since the session began, the Commons had spent thirty-six days considering government legislation, including the thirteen days...

    • The Provinces
      (pp. 99-228)
      PETER OLIVER, JEAN-CHARLES BONENFANT, DUNCAN FRASER, RICHARD WILBUR, TOM PETERSON, NEIL A. SWAINSON, FRANK MacKINNON, NORMAN WARD, MARIAN McKENNA, LESLIE HARRIS and NORA T. CORLEY

      Sweeping all before them, Ontario’s amazing Tories, with their awesome powers of regeneration and their formidable “Big Blue Machine,” defied political trends which in the previous two years had seen six governments toppled in eight provinces, and emerged from the October 21 election more solidly entrenched than ever. Few who had watched the Conservative leadership convention of the previous February, which almost reluctantly had given the premier’s chair to William Davis, would have predicted an election landslide. Yet the new leader assumed command with verve and decision. Election night was the culmination of a virtuoso performance by a masterful political...

  7. External Affairs and Defence

    • External Affairs and Defence
      (pp. 231-306)
      R.B. BYERS

      In 1971 the government of Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau attempted to implement further the 1970 foreign policy white papers, while critics of the Trudeau doctrine mounted a rather ineffective counter-attack. It became increasingly clear that in many important respects the rhetoric could not be implemented, as relations with other nations proved to be too complex. The neonationalism of the white papers was not manifested in terms of a turning inward, even though the long-awaited defence white paper reflected national, as distinct from international, priorities. As in the pre-1968 period Canada indicated a willingness to perform the role of “helpful fixer”...

  8. The National Economy

    • The National Economy
      (pp. 309-366)
      JIM CUTT

      Both the statistical overview and the discussion of major policy debates must be seen in the context of the major policy objectives of Canadian economic policy. Objectives may be couched in “achievement” terms, reflecting long-term national aspirations, such as the attainment of a rising standard of living or the improvement of the quality of life. But objectives may also be couched in performance or “means-to-an-end” terms, and it is this latter form which will serve as the context for this review.

      Performance objectives for economic policy are not, of course, immutable, and evolve over time in relation to changing circumstances....

  9. Obituaries
    (pp. 367-373)
  10. Acknowledgments
    (pp. 374-374)
  11. Index
    (pp. 375-390)