Change of Plans

Change of Plans: Towards a Non-Sexist Sustainable City

Edited by Margrit Eichler
Copyright Date: 1995
Pages: 192
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/j.ctt2ttv77
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  • Book Info
    Change of Plans
    Book Description:

    Change of Plansraises questions that are not commonly posed, suggests new avenues for thought in city planning, and contributes to the growing literature on sustainability by merging it with a feminist approach.

    eISBN: 978-1-4426-0242-7
    Subjects: Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. vi-vi)
  4. THE CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. vii-viii)
  5. FOREWORD
    (pp. ix-x)
    Margrit Eichler

    This book had a very personal start. Early in 1994, I was invited by a team of architects to participate in a competition held by the province of Ontario to design an ecologically sustainable city. I accepted, for the fun of it, although city planning is not an area in which I had done previous work. When our team was one of three eventually selected to proceed with the design, I wondered what I had taken on. I was the only sociologist and the only feminist on the team. Our proposal stated that our design would be non-sexist. I thought...

  6. DESIGNING ECO-CITY IN NORTH AMERICA
    (pp. 1-24)
    Margrit Eichler

    Ever since I ceased being a student (at least in an official sense) all of my academic and community work has been informed by a feminist perspective. This encompasses, by now, a long period of time and work in various substantive areas. Some years ago I felt it was impossible to continue to ignore the state of the environment. If our survival on this planet is, indeed, threatened – which I believe to be the case – what help will social justice be to us as we lie gasping for a clean breath of air on our devastated earth? Is...

  7. DECONSTRUCTING THE MAN MADE CITY: FEMINIST CRITIQUES OF PLANNING THOUGHT AND ACTION
    (pp. 25-50)
    Sherilyn MacGregor

    This chapter is a product of my two frustrating years as a planning student. When I arrived at planning school in 1991, fresh out of a women’s studies program, I was surprised to discover that issues of gender and sexism were matters of great controversy. My attempts to raise questions about how planning affects women’s lives provoked much annoyance and eye-rolling amongst my colleagues (“Here she goes again…” they would often mutter). And when I had occasion to use the “f-word,” feminism, I was met with the response that such a perspective was too political and narrowly-focused; in other words,...

  8. SEEKING SHELTER: FEMINIST HOME TRUTHS
    (pp. 51-70)
    Sylvia Novac

    Housing policies may appear to be gender-neutral, but their effects are not. Broad patterns of social inequality are reflected and reinforced by policies that ignore or uphold structural and systemic dynamics of gender, “race,”¹ and class relations.² This is evident in recent research on gendered patterns of inequity in housing tenure, affordability, security, and control. Framing such inequities as a problem only of poverty detracts attention from questions of how male dominance and racism interact with the labour market (including immigration control) and the housing market to organize hierarchies of advantage within our housing system.

    Compared to other levels of...

  9. AT RISK: THE PERSON BEHIND THE ASSUMPTIONS Planning to Protect Human Health
    (pp. 71-88)
    Jeanne Jabanoski

    The origins of this chapter are rooted in my discovery a few years ago that as a woman I was not one of the people who was being “protected” in health risk assessments. I was not assured when I was told that in some planning decisions women are considered a sensitive “sub-population.” When I discovered that these decisions also exclude a number of other people, I began to wonder whose health was being “protected” and how these decisions were being made. This chapter is my attempt to begin to answer those questions.

    In the planning of our communities, whether for...

  10. WHAT DO YOU WANT TO DO? PAVE PARKS? Urban Planning and the Prevention of Violence
    (pp. 89-110)
    Carolyn Whitzman

    First off, a bit of background. Since 1989, I have been the co-ordinator of the City of Toronto Safe City Committee. The Safe City Committee works with the municipal government to prevent violence against women and other vulnerable groups such as children and the elderly in our homes, our workplaces, and on the streets. The Committee is staffed by the Planning and Development Department, which also provides staff for a number of other community service initiatives, including a bicycle safety co-ordinator and an accessibility consultant for people with disabilities.¹

    Safety from violence, whether it be in the home, in the...

  11. SOWING THE SEEDS OF SUSTAINABILITY: PLANNING FOR FOOD SELF-RELIANCE
    (pp. 111-130)
    Connie Guberman

    Part of the larger vision of more liveable, sustainable cities is planning for food production at the local community level. Growing food in cities is not a new phenomenon. Dating back at least to early Inca, Aztec, and Mayan settlements, communities have produced some of their own food. Urban and rural values were necessarily integrated for survival. The shape of early towns and villages was determined by their relationship to the cultivated areas. Public open spaces had a functional purpose and were put to productive use.¹

    The relationship between rural and urban living changed during the industrialization of the eighteenth...

  12. ACCESS OVER EXCESS: TRANSCENDING CAPTIVITY AND TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGE
    (pp. 131-156)
    Sue Zielinski

    Every once in a while a term will crop up that seems to capture the essence of a situation. But I must admit I hesitate to celebrate the day I hit the jackpot with not one, but two such telling terms. While the chance discovery of two glorious golden nuggets of cultural representation more than tickled my sense of irony, I knew right away that this transportation chapter was not going to be the linear, academic piece of work that I perhaps too often strive to achieve. It was going to move in its own direction, and I was decidedly...

  13. PLANNING CHANGE: NOT AN END BUT A BEGINNING
    (pp. 157-168)
    Sherilyn MacGregor

    This book is the product of a collective process. Over the course of several months, seven of us came together to discuss our respective chapters and the progress of the book. We gave each other feedback on drafts and encouragement when putting words down on paper seemed impossible. We shared ideas, experiences, visions, food, and sometimes wine. And when it came time to write a final chapter we all agreed that it should be based on a group dialogue expressing our collective reflections about the book and its themes.

    The discussion took place in Margrit Eichler’s living room on a...

  14. REFERENCES
    (pp. 169-185)