Fearless

Fearless: The Complete Personal Safety Guide for Women

Paul Henry Danylewich
Copyright Date: 2001
Pages: 176
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/j.ctt2tv477
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  • Book Info
    Fearless
    Book Description:

    Practical advice on personal safety awareness and a variety of easy, effective self-defence strategies, illustrated with over 140 action photos.

    eISBN: 978-1-4426-7481-3
    Subjects: Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Preface
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xi-2)
  5. Introduction
    (pp. 3-4)

    Violence against women occurs in overwhelming proportions throughout the world. It is not just a women’s issue, it is a community issue that affects us all – men, women, and children. Violence or even the threat of violence has the potential to produce a level of fear that can control people’s lives. The number of women who live in fear of becoming the next crime statistic increases on a daily basis. Most of us know at least one person (a friend, family member, or acquaintance) who has been the victim of a violent crime. We are all somehow touched by...

  6. Section 1: General Awareness Strategies
    (pp. 5-42)

    Enhancing security in your home is the first step in preventing crime. If it is not done properly, many devices designed to keep burglars out can serve as death traps instead, confining you and your family inside your residence. It is recommended that you consult with your local fire department concerning any changes or upgrades that you are considering or have already made to your home.

    House burglars often break in through a basement window, usually one in the rear of the house that cannot easily be seen from the street. As a deterrence, consider installing metal burglar bars in...

  7. Section 2: Resistance Alternatives
    (pp. 43-114)

    Offenders are usually motivated by a need to control the victim. This control can range from verbal coercion to physical violence. A victim’s natural response to an assault is usually one of fear and helplessness. This response helps the offender gain control over his victim. This is an understandable reaction under the circumstances. The victim should never be condemned for having experienced this reaction. It is not the victim’s fault.

    The offender depends on this type of reaction and uses it to gain further control over his victim. He is not looking for a challenge or for a fight. He...

  8. References
    (pp. 115-116)
  9. Index
    (pp. 117-118)
  10. About the Author
    (pp. 119-119)
    Paul Henry Danylewich