The Dandy in Irish and American Southern Fiction

The Dandy in Irish and American Southern Fiction: Aristocratic Drag

ELLEN CROWELL
Copyright Date: 2007
Pages: 240
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3366/j.ctt1r28tm
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  • Book Info
    The Dandy in Irish and American Southern Fiction
    Book Description:

    This book identifies and interprets the longstanding, transatlantic dialogue between the literary imaginations of Anglo-Ireland and the Anglo-American South.

    eISBN: 978-0-7486-3101-8
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. vi-vi)
  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. vii-x)
  5. INTRODUCTION: SHAM GRANDEURS, SHAM CHIVALRIES: ARCHITECTURES OF ARISTOCRACY IN IRELAND AND THE AMERICAN SOUTH
    (pp. 1-27)

    In 1845, following the publication of his The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Frederick Douglass escaped recapture by travelling through the British Isles, lecturing on the American abolitionist movement. Visiting Ireland on the eve of the Famine, he drew comparisons between destitute Irish peasants living as tenants on Anglo-Irish estates and African-American slaves living on plantations in the American South:

    [Irish peasants] lacked only black skin and woolly hair, to complete their likeness to the plantation Negro. The open, uneducated, mouth – the long gaunt arm – the badly formed foot and ankle – the...

  6. CHAPTER 1 OAKS, SERPENTS AND DANDIES: PSEUDOARISTOCRACY IN MARIA EDGEWORTH’S CASTLE RACKRENT AND JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY’S SWALLOW BARN
    (pp. 28-70)

    In a posthumously published sketch entitled ‘A Legend of Maryland’ (1871), John Pendleton Kennedy, Baltimore statesman and novelist, imagined as Irish the cultural foundations of his Southern home state. Kennedy, the son of a Scots-Irish immigrant father and a mother born into the Tidewater Virginia plantocracy, was himself a walking testament to how Irish culture blended with that of the Southern landowning classes in the antebellum South. Yet in this regional origin legend, the writer’s veneration of men who embody a particularly Irish form of national sentiment in colonial Maryland goes beyond celebrating the proverbial melting pot; Kennedy insists on...

  7. CHAPTER 2 THE PICTURE OF CHARLES BON: OSCAR WILDE’S TRIP THROUGH FAULKNER’S YOKNAPATAWPHA
    (pp. 71-124)

    In the final chapter of Jefferson Davis, American, William J. Cooper concludes his biography of the South’s enigmatic president by describing a curious encounter. In 1882, a near-bankrupt Davis was living on Mississippi’s Gulf coast at Beauvoir, a ‘raised cottage . . . [of] considerable size . . . Greek Revival details, and extensive grounds’ (Cooper 2000: 611). Attempts to reinvigorate Briarfield, his family’s Mississippi plantation, were failing. His two-volume Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, published in 1881 as a ‘monument to his cause’ (ibid.: 619), received mostly faint praise, and most reviewers depicted him as ‘a man...

  8. CHAPTER 3 FEROCIOUS BEAUTY: ELIZABETH BOWEN, KATHERINE ANNE PORTER AND THE MODERNIST FEMALE DANDY
    (pp. 125-177)

    In the spring of 1950, Katherine Anne Porter received a letter from her niece Ann Holloway, who was then touring Europe with a New York-based ballet troupe. Because of Porter’s literary reputation in London, Ann wrote, she was enjoying attention not only from dance enthusiasts, but from literary ones as well. In a subsequent letter Porter recounted this evidence of her ‘fame in Europe’ with obvious pride and amusement:

    It would not occur to me that a soul in England had ever heard of me. . . . Yet stop. Did I tell you Ann’s account of my fame in...

  9. EPILOGUE: THE DANDY UNMASKED: EMMA DONOGHUE’S ‘WORDS FOR THINGS’ AND JIM GRIMSLEY’S DREAM BOY
    (pp. 178-188)

    On 25 December 1998, the confirmed bachelor and B-movie actor forever identified with Wilde’s Dorian Gray passed away in Cork, Ireland. Hurd Hatfield was the perfect Dorian Gray for Albert Lewin’s 1945 film; like Wilde himself, the actor’s elegant and acerbic mannerisms allowed him to ‘pass’ as an upper-class Englishman despite foreign birth. Hatfield’s vaguely sadistic sexual charisma landed him this signature role, even though his dark hair and eyes contradicted Wilde’s original golden-haired, blue-eyed Dorian. Although Lewin played it safe when it came to the novel’s suggestive treatment of sexuality, replacing Wilde’s miasma of queer influences with a mysterious...

  10. WORKS CITED AND CONSULTED
    (pp. 189-200)
  11. INDEX
    (pp. 201-206)