Spanish Horror Film

Spanish Horror Film

Antonio Lázaro-Reboll
Copyright Date: 2012
Pages: 256
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3366/j.ctt3fgrkr
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  • Book Info
    Spanish Horror Film
    Book Description:

    Spanish Horror Film is the first in-depth exploration of the genre in Spain from the 'horror boom' of the late 1960s and early 1970s to the most recent production in the current renaissance of Spanish genre cinema, through a study of its production, circulation, regulation and consumption. The examination of this rich cinematic tradition is firmly located in relation to broader historical and cultural shifts in recent Spanish history and as an important part of the European horror film tradition and the global culture of psychotronia.Key Features: The first critical study on Spanish horror film to be published in English.An overview of key directors, cycles and representative films as well as of more obscure and neglected horror production.A detailed analysis of the work of directors such as Jesús Franco, Amando de Ossorio, Narciso Ibáñez Serrador, Eloy de la Iglesia, Jaume Balagueró, Nacho Cerdá and Guillermo del Toro's Spanish" films.A focus on critical and cult contexts of reception in Spain

    eISBN: 978-0-7486-3640-2
    Subjects: Film Studies

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. vi-viii)
  4. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. ix-xii)
  5. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-10)

    Contemporary contexts of horror, psychotronic and paracinema fandom in the US, UK and Spain have been crucial in the circulation and treatment of Spanish horror films past and present. As a fan, reader and consumer of American alternative publications such as The Psychotronic Encyclopedia of Film and Video Watchdog and of Spanish fanzine 2000maniacos in the early 1990s, my own positioning, taste and subcultural capital in relation to Spanish and international horror cinematic traditions and, by extension, the wider cultural field of horror are informed by paracinema and psychotronic culture. In his fan publication The Psychotronic Encyclopedia of Film (1989),...

  6. 1. THE SPANISH HORROR BOOM: 1968–75
    (pp. 11-51)

    In a résumé of Spanish cinematic activity in 1973, published in the film review yearbook Cine para leer, the country’s filmic production was described with the following graphic visual image: ‘There was a time when Spanish cinema was tinged with red . . . bloody red’ (1974: 21). It could well characterise the period 1968 to 1975, when the Spanish film industry went into horror overdrive, producing around 150 horror films, which accounted for more than a third of the national industry’s output. ‘Our producers, scriptwriters and filmmakers’, the review reads, ‘have released a whole “vile rabble” of sadists, traumatised...

  7. 2. SPANISH HALL OF MONSTERS IN THE 1960s AND EARLY 1970s
    (pp. 52-96)

    The crimes, obsessions and ghoulish activities of Dr Orloff, lycanthrope Waldemar Daninsky and the macabre Knights Templar form the focus of our attention in this chapter. These are the select ‘vile rabble’ that entered the Spanish Hall of Monsters: a sadistic mad doctor, a werewolf and the Blind Dead, who terrorised, captivated and entertained local and international horror audiences in the 1960s and 1970s. And these days, they have an international reputation among horror fans all over the world. Chronologically speaking, Dr Orloff is the avant-gardist of the rabble. His first appearance in Gritos en la noche / The Awful...

  8. 3. NARCISO IBÁÑEZ SERRADOR, HORRORMEISTER: HISTORIAS PARA NO DORMIR (1966–8), LA RESIDENCIA (1969) AND ¿QUIÉN PUEDE MATAR A UN NIÑO? (1976)
    (pp. 97-126)

    Narciso Ibáñez Serrador was the most culturally prominent image of horror in Spain in the late 1960s due to his horror–suspense TV series Historias para no dormir / Stories to Keep You Awake (1966–8). This chapter provides a detailed analysis of Ibáñez Serrador’s horror production made for television and his two forays into film, La residencia / The Finishing School and ¿Quién puede matar a un niño?,¹ and appraises how the director’s work legitimated a popular taste in horror which was formative for generations of Spanish television audiences. While journalistic approaches to the work of Ibáñez Serrador have...

  9. 4. THE HORROR CYCLE OF ELOY DE LA IGLESIA (1971–3)
    (pp. 127-155)

    An approach to Eloy de la Iglesia’s horror cycle of 1971–3 began to form itself during the course of a research visit to the Spanish Film Institute in Madrid, and arose from what I now relate in the form of two anecdotes: the first is based on a brief exchange I had with one of the archivists in the Archivo Gráfico unit when I requested the pressbooks for the films El techo de cristal, La semana del asesino, Nadie oyó gritar and Una gota de sangre para morir amando; the second comes in the form of a cartoon published...

  10. 5. DEVOTED TO HORROR: FROM TERROR FANTASTIC (1971–3) TO 2000MANIACOS (1989–PRESENT)
    (pp. 156-197)

    Terror Fantastic and 2000maniacos are landmark publications in the field of Spanish horror of the last four decades. The study of specialist film magazines and fanzines aids in an understanding of how different cultural producers not only think and write about the genre and adjacent subcultures but also act as cultural platforms for constructions of Spanish film history and its canon. These two publications provide a prime example of the cultural capital developing from and around horror cinema and the emergence of specific horror fan cultures in Spain. Terror Fantastic was the first specialist film magazine in horror and science...

  11. 6. POST-1975 HORROR PRODUCTION
    (pp. 198-232)

    The production of horror in the late 1970s and during the 1980s decreases dramatically, for reasons that have been addressed in the previous chapter: firstly, the boom in historical and political films during the period of the Transición and the early years of democracy; secondly, the film legislation established by the Socialist government in 1983, the so-called Ley Miró, which privileged the production of high-quality films, based mainly on literary or historical sources; and, thirdly, changing habits in the production, circulation and consumption of audiovisual material. It is not until the mid- to late 1990s and the early 2000s that...

  12. 7. TRANSNATIONAL HORROR AUTEURS: NACHO CERDÀ, JAUME BALAGUERÓ AND GUILLERMO DEL TORO
    (pp. 233-270)

    Horror magazine Fangoria hailed Jaume Balagueró, Nacho Cerdà and Guillermo del Toro as ‘The Future of Fear’ in its 200th issue. The report profiled ‘13 rising horror talents who promise to keep us terrified for the next 200 issues and beyond’ (2001: 80), including directors, writers and a make-up artist.¹ Fangoria greeted the ‘somber, chilling power’ of Balagueró’s first feature film, Los sin nombre / The Nameless (1999), as a movie that ‘is as quietly chilling as any movie from any country in the past several years’ (Gingold 2001: 80);² invited its readers to ‘witness the creation of a major...

  13. CONCLUSION
    (pp. 271-277)

    The field of contemporary Spanish horror film is broad. Horror event movies, such as El orfanato and Los ojos de Julia, reflect changes in industrial practices and reach mainstream audiences. The do-it-yourself attitude of niche horror production company Chaparra Entertainment, ‘making Spanish Monster Movies since 1997’ (chaparraentertainment.com), is channelled and circulated via the internet, with the character of ‘Amazing Mask, El Asombroso Luchador Enmascarado’ as the main superhero in the episodes ‘Amazing Unmasked vs. El Doctor Calavera Maligna’ and ‘Amazing Mask vs. La sobrenatural Mujer Voodoo’, celebrating the world of the Mexican horror / wrestling movie and in particular...

  14. SELECT FILMOGRAPHY
    (pp. 278-282)
  15. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 283-296)
  16. INDEX
    (pp. 297-308)