Writing Projects for Mathematics Courses

Writing Projects for Mathematics Courses: Crushed Clowns, Cars, and Coffee to Go

Annalisa Crannell
Gavin LaRose
Thomas Ratliff
Elyn Rykken
Copyright Date: 2004
Edition: 1
Pages: 129
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.4169/j.ctt5hh9qq
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  • Book Info
    Writing Projects for Mathematics Courses
    Book Description:

    Writing Projects for Mathematics Courses is a collection of writing projects suitable in a wide range of undergraduate mathematics courses, from a survey of mathematics to differential equations. The projects vary in their level of difficulty and in the mathematics that they require, but are similar in the mode of presentation and use of applications. Students see these problems as real in a way that textbooks problems are not, even though many of the characters involved (e.g., dime–store detectives and CEOs) are obviously fictional. The stories are sometimes fanciful and sometimes grounded in standard scientific applications, but the mere existence of the story draws the students in and makes the problem relevant.

    eISBN: 978-1-61444-113-7
    Subjects: Mathematics

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. 1 Introduction and Supporting Information
    (pp. 1-8)

    In this volume we have collected a group of writing projects suitable for use in a wide range of undergraduate mathematics courses, from a survey of mathematics to differential equations. The projects vary in their level of difficulty and in the mathematics that they require, but are similar in their mode of presentation and use of applications. Students see these problems as “real” in a way that textbook problems are not, even though many of the characters in the projects (e.g., dime-store detectives and CEOs) are obviously fictional. The stories that these characters tell are sometimes fanciful and sometimes grounded...

  4. 2 Projects
    (pp. 9-96)

    In this chapter, we present three dozen writing projects that we have used in mathematics courses ranging from precalculus to differential equations. Because we (the four authors) have such different writing styles, we group the project first by author and then by the course in which we assigned the project.

    Readers should note, however, that many of the projects may be applicable to other courses. For example, some of the projects from early in Calculus I would work well in a Precalculus course, and some of the Calculus I projects may be just as appropriate for Calculus II, or vice...

  5. 3 Sample Solutions
    (pp. 97-112)

    In this chapter we include two sample solution papers, with comments on how they might be graded, one using a checklist and one using a rubric. In the first case, this is an actual solution paper that one of the authors received, while the other is a fabricated paper that illustrates the type of project solutions that we are accustomed to receiving. In both cases the reader will note the changes that would change an adequate solution paper into a very good one. We have found that the papers we receive are, on the whole, of quite good quality—especially...

  6. 4 Additional Sample Checklists and Rubrics
    (pp. 113-116)
  7. 5 Index by Course
    (pp. 117-118)
  8. Back Matter
    (pp. 119-120)