The Arts in Early American History

The Arts in Early American History: Needs and Opportunities for Study

AN ESSAY BY WALTER MUIR WHITEHILL
WENDELL D. GARRETT
JANE N. GARRETT
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9780807838228_whitehill
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  • Book Info
    The Arts in Early American History
    Book Description:

    This summary essay and the heavily annotated bibliography covering the period from the first colonization to 1826 are primarily intended to aid the scholar and student by suggesting areas of further study and ways of expanding the conventional interpretations of early American history.

    eISBN: 978-1-4696-0045-1
    Subjects: History, Art & Art History

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. vii-x)
    Walter Muir Whitehill

    During the past dozen years the Institute of Early American History and Culture has held several conferences on needs and opportunities for study in various fields of early American history. From these has evolved the publication of Whitfield J. Bell’s Early American Science (1955), William N. Fenton’s American Indian and White Relations to 1830 (1957), and Bernard Bailyn’s Education in the Forming of American Society (1960). A similar conference on the arts was held at the Conference Center at Williamsburg on March 7, 1964, under the joint sponsorship of the Institute, Colonial Williamsburg, Incorporated, the Archives of American Art, and...

  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. xi-2)
  4. AN UNEXPLOITED HISTORICAL RESOURCE
    (pp. 3-34)
    Walter Muir Whitehill

    Forty years ago when I was a Harvard undergraduate the history of art seemed to fall into a neat pattern, according to which towering peaks of achievement rose at irregular but quite-well-agreed-upon points in time and space above valleys that were mostly obscured in mist. Egypt and Mesopotamia were the precursors of the glory of Greece. Between imperial Rome and Gothic France some not very thoroughly mapped highlands of early Christian, Byzantine, and Romanesque were known to exist. In the Renaissance, Italy towered above all neighbors, as France did in the centuries that followed. In various periods of time, minor...

  5. A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTS IN EARLY AMERICAN HISTORY
    (pp. 35-152)
    Wendell D. Garrett and Jane N. Garrett

    The widespread interest of Americans in their early arts is of scarcely nine decades’ duration, a scholarly concern about them only four. Artifacts and works of art are now an institutional treasure, their curatorship a specialized career, the historical writing based on them a corporate task. A large and sophisticated profession has grown up around them, integrating its activities through the seminar, the learned society, and the scholarly journal. This bibliography attempts to record the most important writings proceeding from these activities over the past forty years. Many are solid scholarship, and share the qualities of the best contemporary historical...

  6. INDEX
    (pp. 153-170)