The History of Randolph-Macon Woman's College

The History of Randolph-Macon Woman's College: From the Founding in 1891 Through the Year of 1949-1950

Roberta D. Cornelius
Copyright Date: 1951
Pages: 488
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9780807869680_cornelius
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  • Book Info
    The History of Randolph-Macon Woman's College
    Book Description:

    The history of Randolph-Macon Woman's College has a claim upon the attention of all who are interested in the education and achievement of women. Its course through the years is set forth in the present volume, in which the author has dealt with the pattern of life developed in the cultivation of the liberal arts.A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

    eISBN: 978-0-8078-3808-2
    Subjects: Education

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. vii-x)
    Theodore H. Jack

    The american college is one of the most distinctive institutions developed by the genius of the American spirit since the beginning of English civilization in our land. Except for the church, it is the earliest institution of a general public character developed by our people. As an institution, the college antedates by more than a century the separation of our people from the Mother Country and the establishment of a new national government.

    Fashioned in the beginning on an English model, it has beaten new paths and followed new practices. The college has been the seed-ground of American democracy, the...

  3. PREFACE
    (pp. xi-xiv)
    R.D.C
  4. Table of Contents
    (pp. xv-2)
  5. Chapter One RANDOLPH-MACON ORIGINS AND GROWTH
    (pp. 3-19)

    Founded in 1891, Randolph-Macon Woman’s College opened its doors to students on September 14, 1893. The history of its parent foundation, the Randolph-Macon Board of Trustees, goes back, however, to the third decade of the nineteenth century. Then it was that the movement was initiated which led first to the establishing of Randolph-Macon College for men and, some sixty years after that event, to the development of the Randolph-Macon System of colleges and preparatory schools. Thus when the college for women was founded there lay behind it nearly seventy years of history. Though the original charter, granted by the Legislature...

  6. Chapter Two THE FOUNDING OF RANDOLPH-MACON WOMAN’S COLLEGE
    (pp. 20-38)

    No one who remembers Dr. William Waugh Smith can forget his faith in the education of women. According to statements made by Dr. R. E. Blackwell, Dr. A. W. Terrell,¹ and others who knew him even before his college for women was established, he had long believed that the women of the South were worthy of better educational opportunities than had been provided for them, and students at Randolph-Macon Woman’s College during his administration remember that in his chapel talks he often mentioned his early awareness of the need, re-stating his faith in the college that he had founded to...

  7. Chapter Three THE FIRST TEAR, 1893-1894
    (pp. 39-56)

    The opening of the College was heralded by detailed advertisements and somewhat less detailed news items in the Lynchburg papers of early September, 1893. Dr. Smith, a veritable genius in the art of presenting a cause, skillfully marshaled the pertinent facts in double-column array and published them in theNewsof September 2. Everything would be ready, he said, by the opening day, which was to be Thursday, September 14. The boarding department would be full, all but four rooms of those ready for use during the first term having already been engaged. This advertisement, he continued, was being addressed...

  8. Chapter Four THE FIRST DECADE AFTER THE OPENING YEAR
    (pp. 57-112)

    The decade of 1894-1904 was one of steady advance and improvement. The barren aspect of the campus was relieved by the sowing of grass and the planting of trees. Before the first year ended, the maples had been planted along the main driveway. In the early years three dogwoods given by Mr. Burks's father were planted on the east slope of the campus. In 1899 the two magnolias in front of Main Hall and the now famous wistaria were set out. Thus the grounds soon began to acquire the gracious aspect that Dr. William Waugh Smith had from the first...

  9. Chapter Five A PERIOD OF EXPANSION
    (pp. 113-132)

    When in the spring of 1904 Dr. Smith secured from the Board authorization for the erection of a new building, he saw the possibility of carrying forward plans that he had long been cherishing. New dormitories, a new science building, a new library—even a new laundry—had been taking shape in his mental vision, and now they were to appear in bricks and mortar. The development of greater educational facilities would undoubtedly bring even greater recognition in the academic world—and so it was to be. By faith, hard work, and idealism Dr. Smith marched ahead bearing the standard...

  10. Chapter Six THE CONCLUDING YEARS OF DR. WILLIAM WAUGH SMITH’S ADMINISTRATION
    (pp. 133-164)

    In june, 1907, the position of Randolph-Macon Woman’s College in relation to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching seemed secure. The latter had officially accepted it as one of the two or three Southern institutions entitled to receive from the Foundation pensions for their retiring professors, and one of its professors had already been given the advantage of this provision. Dr. Henry S. Pritchett, president of the Foundation, had pointed out, however, that such statements as had occurred in the publications of the Methodist Board of Education, when this institution was included in the list of the colleges...

  11. Chapter Seven A PERIOD OF TRANSITION
    (pp. 165-171)

    Not even the controversy in its governing board had imposed so acid a test upon Randolph-Macon Woman’s College as did the death of its great founder. For Dr. Smith had built it more out of his own life than with bricks and mortar. He had made liberal gifts in time and money, but more than that he had literally given himself.¹ No task had ever been too bitter or too difficult for him if through performing it he could contribute to the good of his beloved college. Always ready to profit by his own mistakes and to work with his...

  12. Chapter Eight DR. WILLIAM A. WERB’S ADMINISTRATION
    (pp. 172-206)

    The new president’s attitude of mind toward his predecessor and toward the college that he had come to serve was shown in his opening address to the students and faculty on September 18, 1913. None but his own words still pulsing with life can do justice to the deep feeling of the speaker. Dr. Webb portrayed himself in his tribute to Randolph-Macon and to Dr. Smith; such language could but proceed from a reverent mind imbued with a noble humility.

    “To the students who have returned,” said Dr. Webb, “and to those who enter today for the first time, the...

  13. Chapter Nine DR. DICE R. ANDERSON’S ADMINISTRATION
    (pp. 207-261)

    Upon the death of dr. webb, Dr. Pattillo was again asked to serve as acting president. He did so with the conscientious devotion to the College that was characteristic of his entire connection with it. When difficulty presented itself or sorrow came he was ready to meet it, just as in happy circumstances he was a capable guide.

    Bereavement, which had so lately visited the College in the deaths of Dr. and Mrs. Webb, now came again. Professor J. L. Armstrong, the head of the English Department and one of the ablest members of the first faculty, died of pneumonia...

  14. Chapter Ten THE ADMINISTRATION OF DEAN N. A. PATTILLO AS ACTING PRESIDENT
    (pp. 262-268)

    After dr. anderson’s resignation had been accepted and a committee appointed to select his successor, Dr. N. A. Pattillo, dean of the College since 1907 and twice its acting president, was again designated as acting president, “ad interim. . . pending the election of a president.”¹ He assumed the duties of this office in August, 1931.² In his first report to the Board (June, 1932), he expressed his reluctance to take up the duties of chief administrative officer of the College but said that his great interest in the College had led him to do so. He spoke of...

  15. Chapter Eleven THE PERIOD OF 1933 TO 1950 UNDER THE ADMINISTRATION OF DR. THEODORE H. JACK
    (pp. 269-336)

    February 21, 1933, was an auspicious day in the annals of Randolph-Macon Woman’s College. On that day at a called meeting of the Board of Trustees it was announced that the committee which had been appointed in June, 1931, to nominate a president for the College had selected Dr. Theodore Henley Jack, then vice-president of Emory University. The report was received with enthusiasm and Dr. Jack was unanimously elected. He accepted the presidency that same month¹ and entered upon the duties of his new office in July, 1933. By his own request, there was no formal inauguration.

    In theAlumnae...

  16. Chapter Twelve THE COLLEGE AND ITS ALUMNAE
    (pp. 337-348)

    As president Jack has said, and as anyone who gives the matter serious thought must recognize, no college is ever completely builded any more than an individual’s education is ever finished. It continues to grow and to be built. It continually seeks to enlarge its service and to consolidate its structure. It is never satisfied with itself but lives ever in the light of that wordcommencement,which at the close of every academic year indicates, not an end, but a beginning and a renewal.

    Thus it is with Randolph-Macon Woman’s College. Its past gives it reassurance without complacency. It...

  17. NOTE ON ALUMNAE NAMES AND CLASS AFFILIATIONS
    (pp. 351-351)
  18. NOTE ON ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. 352-352)
  19. NOTES ON THE CHAPTERS
    (pp. 353-400)
  20. INDEX
    (pp. 401-428)
  21. [Illustrations]
    (pp. None)