Kim Ki-duk

Kim Ki-duk

Hye Seung Chung
Copyright Date: 2012
Pages: 176
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt1xcqqm
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  • Book Info
    Kim Ki-duk
    Book Description:

    This study investigates the controversial motion pictures written and directed by the independent filmmaker Kim Ki-duk, one of the most acclaimed Korean auteurs in the English-speaking world. Propelled by underdog protagonists who can only communicate through shared corporeal pain and extreme violence, Kim's graphic films have been classified by Western audiences as belonging to sensationalist East Asian "extreme" cinema, and Kim has been labeled a "psychopath" and "misogynist" in South Korea._x000B__x000B_Drawing upon both Korean-language and English-language sources, Hye Seung Chung challenges these misunderstandings, recuperating Kim's oeuvre as a therapeutic, yet brutal cinema of Nietzschean ressentiment (political anger and resentment deriving from subordination and oppression). Chung argues that the power of Kim's cinema lies precisely in its ability to capture, channel, and convey the raw emotions of protagonists who live on the bottom rungs of Korean society. She provides historical and postcolonial readings of victimization and violence in Kim's cinema, which tackles such socially relevant topics as national division in Wild Animals and The Coast Guard and U.S. military occupation in Address Unknown. She also explores the religious and spiritual themes in Kim's most recent works, which suggest possibilities of reconciliation and transcendence.

    eISBN: 978-0-252-09379-1
    Subjects: Film Studies

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Acknowledgments
    (pp. ix-xii)
  4. Beyond “Extreme”: The Cinema of Ressentiment
    (pp. 1-126)

    Alongside Park Chan-wook (Pak Ch’an-uk), famous for his Vengeance Trilogy of films comprisingSympathy for Mr. Vengeance(Poksu nǔn na ǔi kǒt; 2002),Oldboy(Oldǔ poi; 2003), andLady Vengeance(Ch’ingǒlhan Kǔmjassi; 2005), Kim Ki-duk is one of the most acclaimed Korean filmmakers in the Western world. As of 2011, an unprecedented ten of Kim’s seventeen feature-length motion pictures are commercially available in the U.S. home-video market:The Isle(Sǒm; 2000),Real Fiction(Siljae sanghwang; 2000),Bad Guy(Nappǔn namja; 2001),Address Unknown(Such’wiin pulmyǒng; 2001),The Coast Guard(Haeansǒn; 2002),Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter … and Spring(Pom yŏrŭm...

  5. Interview with Kim Ki-duk: From Crocodile to Address Unknown
    (pp. 127-140)
    Kim So-hee and KIM KI-DUK

    This interview was originally published in a promotional booklet, edited by Lee Hae-jin, entitledKim Ki-duk: From Crocodile to Address Unknown(Seoul: LJ Film, 2001). It is reprinted here with permission of LJ Film America. Although the interview only covers Kim Ki-duk’s first six feature films, many of the issues, themes, and ideas presented here apply to his later films as well. Several Korean-language interviews about Kim’s more recent films are quoted in the main essay to supplement this interview.

    kim so-hee: The title of your film,Address Unknown, is quite unique.

    kim ki-duk: When I was growing up in...

  6. Filmography
    (pp. 141-146)
  7. Bibliography
    (pp. 147-154)
  8. Index
    (pp. 155-161)
  9. Back Matter
    (pp. 162-164)