The Herbalist in the Kitchen

The Herbalist in the Kitchen

GARY ALLEN
Series: The Food Series
Copyright Date: 2007
Pages: 504
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt3fh6bm
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  • Book Info
    The Herbalist in the Kitchen
    Book Description:

    Created as the ideal reference for anyone with a serious interest in cooking with herbs, spices, or related plant materials, The Herbalist in the Kitchen is truly encyclopedic in scope. It provides detailed information about the uses, botany, toxicity, and flavor chemistry of herbs, as well as a listing for nearly every name that an ingredient is known by around the world. Richly illustrated with fifty-six images from the Missouri Botanical Garden rare book collection, The Herbalist in the Kitchen promises to enlighten cooks of all levels, from beginning culinary artists to seasoned professional chefs. _x000B_Even including herbs and spices not yet seen in the United States (but likely to be featured in recipes for adventurous cooks soon), The Herbalist in the Kitchen is organized into one hundred five sections, each consisting of a single botanical family. The book provides all available information about the chemical compounds responsible for a plant's characteristic taste and scent, which allows cooks to consider new subtleties and potential alternatives. For instance, the primary flavoring ingredient of cloves is eugenol; when a cook knows that bay leaves also contain eugenol, a range of exciting substitutions becomes clear. The foodie's ultimate herbal reference book, The Herbalist in the Kitchen also provides guidance about measuring herbs, enabling readers to understand the dated measuring standards from old-fashioned cookbooks. _x000B_

    eISBN: 978-0-252-09039-4
    Subjects: Sociology, Technology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-x)
  3. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. xi-xii)
  4. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
  5. Introduction
    (pp. 1-10)

    This book is not a reissue of Nicholas Culpeper, even if his work has been the basis of most herbals written in English since the seventeenth century. His list of herbs—with many of the same recommendations for use—has been passed on, modified, and expanded. I hope that the present book is both larger and smaller in scope: larger, because my approach to herbs is not limited in the ways that an author from more than three centuries ago was limited; smaller, because household uses, including pharmacological uses, which were important in Culpeper’s day, are not relevant to our...

  6. 1. Agavaceae: The Agave Family
    (pp. 11-12)
  7. 2. Aizoaceae: The Carpetweed Family
    (pp. 13-13)
  8. 3. Alliaceae (Amaryllidaceae): The Onion Family
    (pp. 13-21)
  9. 4. Amaranthaceae: The Amaranth Family
    (pp. 21-23)
  10. 5. Anacardiaceae: The Cashew Family
    (pp. 23-30)
  11. 6. Annonaceae: The Annona (Custard-Apple) Family
    (pp. 30-32)
  12. 7. Apiaceae (formerly Umbelliferae): The Parsley or Carrot Family
    (pp. 32-71)
  13. 8. Apocynaceae: The Dogbane Family
    (pp. 71-73)
  14. 9. Aquifoliaceae: The Holly Family
    (pp. 73-74)
  15. 10. Araceae: The Arum Family
    (pp. 75-78)
  16. 11. Araliaceae: The Aralia or Ginseng Family
    (pp. 78-81)
  17. 12. Aristlochiaceae: The Birthwort Family
    (pp. 81-83)
  18. 13. Asclepiadaceae: The Milkweed Family
    (pp. 83-84)
  19. 14. Asteraceae (formerly Compositae): The Composite or Sunflower Family
    (pp. 84-114)
  20. 15. Berberidaceae: The Barberry Family
    (pp. 114-115)
  21. 16. Bignoniaceae: The Bignonia Family
    (pp. 115-116)
  22. 17. Bixaceae: The Bixa Family
    (pp. 116-118)
  23. 18. Bombacaceae: The Bombax Family
    (pp. 119-119)
  24. 19. Boraginaceae: The Borage Family
    (pp. 119-123)
  25. 20. Brassicaceae (formerly Cruciferae): The Mustard Family
    (pp. 123-139)
  26. 21. Burseraceae (formerly Simaroubaceae): The Torchwood Family
    (pp. 139-142)
  27. 22. Calycanthaceae: The Calycanthus Family
    (pp. 143-144)
  28. 23. Campanulaceae: The Bellflower Family
    (pp. 144-145)
  29. 24. Cannabaceae: The Hemp Family
    (pp. 145-147)
  30. 25. Cappardaceae (formerly Capparaceae): The Caper Family
    (pp. 147-148)
  31. 26. Caprifoliaceae: The Honeysuckle Family
    (pp. 148-152)
  32. 27. Caryophyllaceae: The Pink Family
    (pp. 152-153)
  33. 28. Celastraceae: The Staff-Tree Family
    (pp. 153-153)
  34. 29. Chenopodiaceae: The Goosefoot or Pigweed family
    (pp. 154-157)
  35. 30. Cistaceae: The Rock Rose Family
    (pp. 157-158)
  36. 31. Convolulaceae: The Morning Glory Family
    (pp. 158-158)
  37. 32. Crassulaceae: The Orpine Family
    (pp. 159-160)
  38. 33. Cupressaceae: The Cypress Family
    (pp. 160-163)
  39. 34. Cyperaceae: The Sedge Family
    (pp. 163-164)
  40. 35. Ericaceae: The Heath Family
    (pp. 165-169)
  41. 36. Euphorbiaceae: The Spurge Family
    (pp. 169-171)
  42. 37. Gentianaceae (formerly Menyanthanaceae): The Gentian Family
    (pp. 171-175)
  43. 38. Geraniaceae: The Geranium Family
    (pp. 175-177)
  44. 39. Guttiferae (Clusicaceae): The Garcinia Family
    (pp. 177-179)
  45. 40. Hydrophyllaceae: The Waterleaf Family
    (pp. 179-180)
  46. 41. Illiciaceae: The Illicium Family
    (pp. 180-182)
  47. 42. Irideaceae: The Iris Family
    (pp. 182-184)
  48. 43. Lamiaceae (formerly Labiatae): The Mint Family
    (pp. 185-238)
  49. 44. Lauraceae (sometimes listed as Myrtaceae): The Laurel Family
    (pp. 238-251)
  50. 45. Leguminosae (sometimes listed as Fabaceae): The Pea or Pulse Family
    (pp. 251-269)
  51. 46. Liliaceae: The Lily Family
    (pp. 269-274)
  52. 47. Magnoliaceae: The Magnolia Family
    (pp. 274-277)
  53. 48. Malvaceae: The Mallow Family
    (pp. 277-283)
  54. 49. Meliaceae: The Mahogany Family
    (pp. 283-283)
  55. 50. Monimiaceae: The Monimia Family
    (pp. 284-285)
  56. 51. Moringaceae: The Moringa Family
    (pp. 285-286)
  57. 52. Myricaceae: The Bayberry or Wax Myrtle Family
    (pp. 286-287)
  58. 53. Myristicaceae: The Nutmeg Family
    (pp. 287-290)
  59. 54. Myrsinaceae: The Myrsine Family
    (pp. 290-291)
  60. 55. Myrtaceae: The Myrtle Family
    (pp. 291-300)
  61. 56. Naiadaceae: The Naiad Family
    (pp. 300-301)
  62. 57. Nyctaginaceae: The Four O’Clock Family
    (pp. 301-301)
  63. 58. Nympheaceae: The Water Lily Family
    (pp. 301-302)
  64. 59. Oleaceae: The Olive Family
    (pp. 303-306)
  65. 60. Orchidaceae: The Orchid Family
    (pp. 306-308)
  66. 61. Oxalidaceae: The Oxalis or Wood Sorrel Family
    (pp. 308-310)
  67. 62. Paeonaceae: The Peony Family
    (pp. 310-311)
  68. 63. Palmae: The Palm Family
    (pp. 311-312)
  69. 64. Pandanceae: The Screw-pine Family
    (pp. 313-315)
  70. 65. Papaveraceae: The Poppy Family
    (pp. 315-317)
  71. 66. Passifloraceae: The Passionflower Family
    (pp. 317-318)
  72. 67. Pedaliaceae: The Pedalium Family
    (pp. 318-320)
  73. 68. Pinaceae: The Pine Family
    (pp. 320-323)
  74. 69. Piperaceae (sometimes listed as Peperomiaceae): The Pepper Family
    (pp. 323-332)
  75. 70. Plantaginaceae: The Plantain Family
    (pp. 332-332)
  76. 71. Poaceae (formerly Gramineae): The Grass Family
    (pp. 333-338)
  77. 72. Polygalaceae: The Milkwort Family
    (pp. 338-339)
  78. 73. Polygonaceae: The Buckwheat Family
    (pp. 339-345)
  79. 74. Polypodiaceae: The Polypody Family
    (pp. 345-347)
  80. 75. Pontederiaceae: The Pickerel Weed Family
    (pp. 347-347)
  81. 76. Portulacaceae: The Purslane Family
    (pp. 348-349)
  82. 77. Primulaceae: The Primrose Family
    (pp. 349-350)
  83. 78. Punicaceae: The Pomegranate Family
    (pp. 350-351)
  84. 79. Ranunculaceae: The Crowfoot or Buttercup Family
    (pp. 351-355)
  85. 80. Resedaceae: The Mignonette Family
    (pp. 355-355)
  86. 81. Rhamnaceae: The Buckthorn Family
    (pp. 356-358)
  87. 82. Rosaceae: The Rose Family
    (pp. 358-369)
  88. 83. Rubiaceae: The Madder Family
    (pp. 369-374)
  89. 84. Rutaceae: The Rue Family
    (pp. 374-391)
  90. 85. Santalaceae: The Sandalwood Family
    (pp. 391-392)
  91. 86. Sapindaceae: The Soapberry Family
    (pp. 392-394)
  92. 87. Sapotaceae: The Sapodilla Family
    (pp. 394-396)
  93. 88. Saururaceae: The Lizard’s Tail Family
    (pp. 396-396)
  94. 89. Schisandraceae: The Schisandra Family
    (pp. 397-397)
  95. 90. Scrophulariaceae: The Figwort Family
    (pp. 397-400)
  96. 91. Solanaceae: The Nightshade Family
    (pp. 401-410)
  97. 92. Sterculiaceae: The Chocolate Family
    (pp. 410-412)
  98. 93. Taxaceae: The Yew Family
    (pp. 413-413)
  99. 94. Theaceae: The Tea Family
    (pp. 413-415)
  100. 95. Tiliaceae: The Linden or Basswood Family
    (pp. 416-417)
  101. 96. Tropaeolaceae: The Nasturtium Family
    (pp. 417-419)
  102. 97. Turneraceae: The Turnera Family
    (pp. 419-420)
  103. 98. Urticaceae: The Nettle Family
    (pp. 420-421)
  104. 99. Valerianaceae: The Valerian Family
    (pp. 421-423)
  105. 100. Verbenaceae: The Verbena or Vervain Family
    (pp. 423-427)
  106. 101. Violaceae: The Violet Family
    (pp. 427-428)
  107. 102. Vitaceae: The Grape or Vine Family
    (pp. 428-429)
  108. 103. Zingiberaceae: The Ginger Family
    (pp. 429-446)
  109. 104. Zygophyllaceae: The Caltrop Family
    (pp. 446-447)
  110. 105. Fungi and Lichens
    (pp. 447-448)
  111. Glossary
    (pp. 449-464)
  112. Sources
    (pp. 465-470)
  113. Bibliography
    (pp. 471-476)
  114. Index
    (pp. 477-484)
  115. Back Matter
    (pp. 485-488)