Mushrooms of the Midwest

Mushrooms of the Midwest

MICHAEL KUO
ANDREW S. METHVEN
Copyright Date: 2014
Pages: 384
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt7zw5pm
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  • Book Info
    Mushrooms of the Midwest
    Book Description:

    Fusing general interest in mushrooming with serious scholarship, Mushrooms of the Midwest describes and illustrates over five hundred of the region's mushroom species. From the cold conifer bogs of northern Michigan to the steamy oak forests of Missouri, the book offers a broad cross-section of the fungi, edible and not, that can be found growing in the Midwest's diverse ecosystems. With hundreds of color illustrations, Mushrooms of the Midwest is ideal for amateur and expert mushroomers alike. Michael Kuo and Andrew S. Methven provide identification keys and thorough descriptions. The authors discuss the DNA revolution in mycology and its consequences for classification and identification, as well as the need for well-documented contemporary collections of mushrooms. Unlike most field guides, Mushrooms of the Midwest includes an extensive introduction to the use of a microscope in mushroom identification. In addition, Kuo and Methven give recommendations for scientific mushroom collecting, with special focus on ecological data and guidelines for preserving specimens. Lists of amateur mycological associations and herbaria of the Midwest are also included. A must-have for all mushroom enthusiasts!

    eISBN: 978-0-252-09600-6
    Subjects: Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Botany & Plant Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. [i]-[iv])
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. [v]-[viii])
  3. 1 INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-7)

    This is an exciting time for the science of mycology and for amateur mycologists, and we hope this book encourages collectors across the Midwest to participate in the scientific effort to better understand the mushrooms of our region.

    Not so long ago, the DNA revolution had not yet penetrated mycology, and mushrooms were understood and identified primarily on the basis of their physical features. The astounding body of work produced by the Midwest’s most prolific, most famous mycologist, Alexander H. Smith (1904–86), represents the pinnacle of the morphology-based approach to mushroom taxonomy in North America. Smith was an amazing...

  4. 2 COLLECTING, DOCUMENTING, AND PRESERVING MUSHROOMS
    (pp. 8-15)

    Collecting mushrooms for study does not require much in the way of equipment; a pocket knife, some waxed paper bags, a marker, insect repellent, and a basket will suffice. You will need the pocket knife in order to dig mushrooms up (preserving their underground parts) and to remove some of the tougher species from logs and such. The waxed paper bags are what you will use to store your mushrooms. Several companies make waxed paper sandwich bags; these are the best mushroom holders. If you cannot get waxed paper bags, brown paper sandwich bags are the next-best option. Plastic bags...

  5. 3 USING A MICROSCOPE TO STUDY MUSHROOMS
    (pp. 16-21)

    Microscopic examination of mushrooms is often essential in the identification process. Because field guides often ignore this reality or treat microscope work as an unfortunate and tedious affair, we wanted to break the mold and encourage you to explore mushroom microscopy. It is true that most of the mushrooms in this book can be at least tentatively identified without recourse to microscopic examination, but confident identification of mushrooms usually requires a microscope. Besides, microscope work can be fun and rewarding. Most of the techniques required are not that difficult to learn, and a decent used microscope can often be picked...

  6. 4 IDENTIFICATION KEYS
    (pp. 22-79)
  7. 5 THE MUSHROOMS
    (pp. 80-396)

    Ecology: Saprobic on the wood of hardwoods; growing alone or gregariously around the bases of stumps and living trees; causing a white rot in deadwood and a white trunk rot in living wood; summer and fall; widely distributed. Cap: Often irregular and covered with the pore surface, but when definable up to 20 cm across; kidney-shaped to semicircular or irregular in outline; whitish to pale brown or reddish brown; sometimes with concentric zones; finely velvety or bald. Pore Surface: Whitish, bruising and discoloring reddish or pinkish brown; pores angular to maze-like or irregular, 1–4 per mm; tubes to 6...

  8. 6 THE EVOLUTIONARY PICTURE
    (pp. 397-400)

    By the time the manuscript we’re writing right now is sent to the printer, some of the information included in the tables below will have changed—and by the time you are reading this, even more changes may have occurred. The DNA revolution in mycology (see chapter 1) has only just begun, and we have little doubt that in future years the names and taxonomic arrangements presented here may appear just as quaint as names like “Collybia dryophila” and “Boletus scaber” appear to today’s readers. But if theories and assumptions weren’t constantly revised on the basis of new data, mycology...

  9. BIBLIOGRAPHY AND WORKS CITED
    (pp. 401-404)
  10. GLOSSARY AND INDEX
    (pp. 405-428)
  11. Back Matter
    (pp. 429-432)