Patterns of Hospital Ownership and Control

Patterns of Hospital Ownership and Control

JAMES A. HAMILTON
R. Bruce Butters
Elbert E. Gilbertson
Copyright Date: 1961
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 180
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.cttts4gv
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  • Book Info
    Patterns of Hospital Ownership and Control
    Book Description:

    Patterns of Hospital Ownership and Control was first published in 1961. Based on a study of data about nearly 7,000 independent unites of hospital service in the United States, this book classifies and describes the patterns or types of hospital ownership and control to be found in the hospital industry. For each pattern, information is given on the organizational structure and governing authority, history, significance, finances, educational activities, administration, medical staff, groups or associations within the pattern, and future trends. The book will enable students of hospital administration to get an overall view of the hospital industry and a familiarity with the groups responsible for hospital care. It will be useful, also, as a reference work for hospital administrators.

    eISBN: 978-0-8166-6278-4
    Subjects: Health Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-viii)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. ix-2)
  3. Introduction
    (pp. 3-16)

    The primary purpose of this study and report is to provide students in hospital administration with a concept of the hospital industry and the different organizations which make hospital care possible in the United States.

    Most of the discussion is devoted to the various individual patterns of hospital ownership and control, and to describing briefly each pattern’s organizational structure and governing authority, history, significance, finances, educational activities, administration, medical staff, groups or associations within the pattern, and future trends. Length of description varies among the patterns, not as an indication of relative importance, but according to the amount of information...

  4. Part I. Governmental Patterns

    • Governmental Hospitals and Their Significance
      (pp. 19-24)

      Governmental hospitals are owned and operated by agencies or departments of the federal, state, and local governments. They constitute less than one third of the nation’s total hospitals and admit just over one fourth of all hospital patients; however, they contain more than two thirds of the hospital beds in this country. In addition, these governmental facilities account for approximately one half of all hospital assets, expenses, and personnel. (See Table 6.)

      This chapter briefly summarizes the total significance of federal, state, and local governmental hospitals. A more detailed discussion of hospitals operated by individual federal agencies, state governments, and...

    • Federal Hospitals
      (pp. 25-66)

      Two types of hospitals, fixed and nonfixed, are maintained by the Department of the Army. Fixed hospitals are designed to operate in the same location over an extended period of time. Nonfixed hospitals are mobile and designed to provide close medical support for combat elements. However, regardless of their location, mission, size, type, or bed capacity, all Army hospitals are similar in their organization and administration.

      Hospitals located outside the continental limits of the United States, its territories or possessions, are under the jurisdiction of the overseas theater commanders. They are generally designated both by number and as surgical, evacuation,...

    • State and Local Governmental Hospitals
      (pp. 67-86)

      In 1956 more than 68 per cent of all state hospitals were located east of the Mississippi River. The early settlement and heavier concentration of population in the eastern section of the country are the two most apparent reasons for the unequal distribution of state hospitals east and west of the Mississippi. Every state government operates at least one state hospital and most states place primary emphasis on programs of institutional care and treatment of the mentally ill and tuberculosis patients. New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Ohio, Illinois, and California maintain the greatest number as might be expected because of their...

  5. Part II. Nongovernmental Patterns

    • Nongovernmental Hospitals and Their Significance
      (pp. 89-95)

      More than two thirds of the hospitals in the United States are nongovernmental institutions (see Table 10). They are owned and operated by nonprofit associations and corporations or by proprietary profit-making enterprises rather than by agencies or departments of governmental units. Although nongovernmental hospitals contain less than one third of the nation’s total hospital beds, they annually admit nearly three fourths of all hospital patients. In addition, they account for roughly one half of all hospital assets, expenses, and personnel.

      The nongovernmental, nonprofit hospitals in the United States form what is commonly referred to as our “voluntary hospital system.” These...

    • Nonprofit Hospitals: Church Affiliated
      (pp. 96-116)

      Hospitals owned and/or operated by religious orders of the Roman Catholic Church constitute one of the most important single patterns of ownership and control in the United States. The tremendous effect these institutions have on the entire hospital industry is best illustrated by the following:

      1. In 1956 the 874 Roman Catholic hospitals in the continental limits of the United States represented more than 72 per cent of all church owned, operated, or related hospitals; almost 25 per cent of the nonprofit hospitals; about 18.5 per cent of the nongovernmental hospitals; and approximately 12.5 per cent of all hospitals in...

    • Other Nonprofit Hospitals
      (pp. 117-148)

      Most of the nonprofit, nongovernmental hospitals in this country are owned and operated, not by church groups or already existing organizations such as fraternal societies or industrial enterprises, but by voluntary associations of public-spirited citizens who are interested in providing hospital care for their community and who are organized solely for that purpose. To distinguish them from other hospitals, institutions of this type are often referred to as “community” hospitals.

      Community hospitals represent the largest and most important single pattern of hospital ownership and control and are the backbone of the voluntary, nonprofit hospital system in the United States. Their...

  6. ADDENDUM: Osteopathic Hospitals
    (pp. 151-154)

    Osteopathy is defined in the 1956 edition ofWebster’s New Collegiate Dictionaryas “a system of medical practice based on the theory that disease is due chiefly to mechanical derangement in tissues, placing emphasis on restoration of structural integrity by manipulation of the parts. The use of medicines, surgery, proper diet, psychotherapy and other measures are included in osteopathy.”

    Practitioners of this science are known as doctors of osteopathy (D.O.) and institutions wholly or predominantly staffed by such physicians are referred to as osteopathic hospitals.

    Organizational Structure and Governing Authority. Osteopathic hospitals vary greatly in their ownership and control. A...

  7. Acknowledgments
    (pp. 155-158)
  8. Bibliography
    (pp. 161-166)