Guidance Procedures in High School

Guidance Procedures in High School: Some Recommended Procedures Based Upon a Survey of Present Practices in Minnesota

C. Gilbert Wrenn
Willis E. Dugan
Volume: 1
Copyright Date: 1950
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 82
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttsc9h
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  • Book Info
    Guidance Procedures in High School
    Book Description:

    Guidance Procedures in High School was first published in 1950. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. This volume is number 1 in the Modern School Practices series; established in 1950 by the College of Education at the University of Minnesota, and the Bureau of Educational Research. The series is designed as a replacement to two earlier series: the Series on Individualization of Instruction and the Modern School Curriculum series. This monograph presents some recommended practices within the framework of a comprehensive and balanced program proposed for student personnel services in high schools. Topics discussed include: organizing and developing guidance services; orientation of new students; understanding the student through the individual inventory; counseling students; learning from group experience; health services; placement in jobs and in further training; and checking on effectiveness of the guidance program._x000B_

    eISBN: 978-1-4529-3859-2
    Subjects: Education

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-x)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. xi-xii)
  3. Chapter 1 ORGANIZING AND DEVELOPING GUIDANCE SERVICES
    (pp. 1-11)

    Organizing guidance services within the framework of an educational program in which teachers and administrators have a “student personnel point of view” is a process of utilizing available resources and techniques. Such a process may take these forms: (1) discovering the real needs and problems of students; (2) using information collected about students to adjust instruction to meet individual needs; (3) developing among teachers more understanding attitudes toward pupil behavior; and (4) providing certain of the specialized services such as orientation, individual inventory, counseling, vocational information, group guidance, health examinations, and the like.

    In a very real sense, the guidance...

  4. Chapter 2 ORIENTATION OF NEW STUDENTS
    (pp. 12-15)

    Entering a new situation, whether one is a student enrolling in school or an adult entering a new place of employment, often means a temporary period of insecurity. Unless some plan exists to help the individual meet the conditions and demands of the new environment, serious problems of adjustment and personal unhappiness may result. The armed forces and industry spend much time and money on the induction of recruits or new employees; schools can afford to do no less. Learning is greatly affected by the feeling of “belonging.”

    Entering high school is often a confusing and bewildering experience. New students...

  5. Chapter 3 UNDERSTANDING THE STUDENT THROUGH THE INDIVIDUAL INVENTORY
    (pp. 16-27)

    Students cannot be understood unless they are known. Knowing each student as an individual, therefore, has become a matter of considerable concern in the modern school. Providing for individual differences through individualized instruction, remedial work, adjustment of educational environment, and personal counseling requires first of all that each student be understood as a person.

    The individual inventory is the broad, inclusive process of securing those basic facts about a student which distinguish him as an individual from other students. Two commonly found elements in the individual inventory process at the high school level are (1) the cumulative record and (2)...

  6. Chapter 4 COUNSELING STUDENTS
    (pp. 28-38)

    Counseling is an inclusive function in the sense that it is performed by all teachers and administrators in varying amounts and with varying degrees of competency. It is, however, only one of several functions in a total guidance program. Counseling is not to be confused with group guidance, on the one hand, or mere interviewing, on the other. The termgroup counselingis improperly used, since counseling always involves the face-to-face relationships of two people. The interview is an important technique in this relationship, but counseling may include finding out about the student before the interview and following up after...

  7. Chapter 5 LEARNING FROM GROUP EXPERIENCE
    (pp. 39-47)

    Group situations have long been recognized as essential for instruction and guidance of the learning process. A new emphasis is being placed upon the values of group work in education, industry, government, and social welfare work. During the past ten years a whole new vocabulary of terms and concepts has been developed to define and describe some of the processes, outcomes, and dynamics of group action. Terms such asgroup dynamics, group roles, member skills, permissive atmosphere, group growth, role playing, interpersonal relationships, group relations skills, we-feeling, sociometry, psycho-drama, group psychotherapy, and many others are commonly encountered in current educational...

  8. Chapter 6 HEALTH SERVICES
    (pp. 48-52)

    To speak of health services in the high school is to disturb some people. “Isn’t health a personal, family matter,” they will ask, “and not a concern of the school at all?” To so argue is to miss one of the great lessons of the past few decades. The school is concerned with aperson—not just a mind—and the physical and mental health of this person is a large factor in his intellectual and social development. The school cannot discharge its educational and social obligation without giving attention to health.

    Health services in the high school are thought...

  9. Chapter 7 PLACEMENT IN JOBS AND IN FURTHER TRAINING
    (pp. 53-58)

    In the beginning phases of organized guidance in the schools, some forty years ago, job placement was an overemphasized function. The entire guidance effort was vocational guidance aimed at specific employment. Developments since then have swung the emphasis to the other extreme so that job placement, the culmination of vocational guidance, is one of theleastconsidered aspects of the program. What has gone wrong here? One cause lies in the development of public employment or placement services outside of the schools, but there are causes more pervasive, too. Educators, in an anxiety to swing away from the narrowly practical...

  10. Chapter 8 CHECKING ON EFFECTIVENESS OF THE GUIDANCE PROGRAM
    (pp. 59-64)

    Acceptance of “face validity,” unfortunately, is all too common in educational procedures—making a change in curriculum, organization, or method because the new procedure “looks” good. Itmaybe a desirable move, but to have only personal impressions of the effectiveness of the new procedure is to invite self-deceit of the worst order. The evaluative phase of a guidance program is almost always left to the last and frequently not completed. Actually, it should be consideredwhen any change is planned, or when any new service or procedure is inaugurated. How many would check the gas mileage of a new...

  11. Appendix. TABLES 1–11
    (pp. 65-71)