The Physico-Chemical Properties of Plant Saps in Relation to Phytogeography

The Physico-Chemical Properties of Plant Saps in Relation to Phytogeography: Data on Native Vegetation in its Natural Environment

J. ARTHUR HARRIS
Copyright Date: 1934
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 348
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttsghf
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  • Book Info
    The Physico-Chemical Properties of Plant Saps in Relation to Phytogeography
    Book Description:

    The Physico-Chemical Properties of Plant Saps in Relation to Phytogeography was first published in 1934. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. This book includes data on native vegitation gathered by the noted botanist J. Arthur Harris in the eastern and western United States, the Hawaiian islands, and Jamaica over a period of 18 years. Included more than 12,000 series of determinations of freezing-point depression, specific electrical conductivity, chloride and sulphate content in grams per liter of sap, and occasional determinations of hydrogen ion concentration. A separate index to the data is included for use by those wishing to make ecological studies of plants in particular communities.

    eISBN: 978-1-4529-3784-7
    Subjects: General Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. PART I. PAPERS ON THE PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF PLANT SAPS IN RELATION TO PHYTOGEOGRAPHY
    • PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY IN THE SERVICE OF PHYTOGEOGRAPHY
      (pp. 3-9)

      Biologists, who have increased in the present generation from a mere squad of determined scouts to a splendid army of disciplined investigators, increasing daily in rank and equipment, have as their greatest task the placing of biology alongside physics and chemistry in the ranks of the exact sciences.

      In the title of this paper, “phytogeography,” which even its most ardent disciples must confess is one of the least quantitative of the biological sciences, is coupled with “physical chemistry,” which is conceded by all to be one of the most precise of the physical sciences. This contrast has been made not...

    • THE PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF PLANT TISSUE FLUIDS: THEIR SIGNIFICANCE IN PHYSIOLOGY, PHYTOGEOGRAPHY, AND ORGANIC EVOLUTION
      (pp. 10-20)

      The purpose for which support is requested is a broad and intensive investigation of the physico-chemical properties of the tissue fluids of plants. These are to be considered in relation to taxonomic affinity, to geographic distribution, and to the complex of environmental factors presented by the soil and by the atmosphere. The physiological processes of the individual are to be interpreted in so far as possible in terms of the physico-chemical properties of its tissue fluids, which constitute by far the larger proportion of the weight of its living tissues, and which are in part the results of its innate...

    • THE IMPORTANCE OF PHYTO-CHEMICAL STUDIES IN THE FIELD OF PLANT GEOGRAPHY
      (pp. 21-24)
      H. L. Shantz

      The study of the distribution of plant life on the surface of the earth is fundamental to any interpretation of land values or any system of land utilization. Throughout all geologic time vegetation has gradually developed in the various areas and come into a state of near equilibrium with the conditions of soil and climate and the biologic factors which make up the environment of the vegetation as a whole or of the individual plant. It is, therefore, not surprising that in the natural vegetation, if rightly interpreted, we have the most accurate measure of the value of land for...

  4. PART II. EXPERIMENTAL DATA ON THE PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE PLANT SAPS OF THE NATIVE VEGETATION
    • COLLECTION OF THE DATA
      (pp. 27-31)

      The experimental data published in this volume were accumulated through a period of fifteen years, during which time numerous field trips were made, covering a large range of habitats and resulting in the collection of over twelve thousand sets of physico-chemical determinations. An idea of the magnitude of this undertaking may be gained from the following chronological table of field work:

      1914. Arizona and Long Island

      1915. Jamaica and Long Island

      1916. Arizona and Florida (Miami)

      1917. Florida (Miami and Okeechobee), North Carolina, and Virginia

      1918. Long Island, New Jersey, and Virginia

      1919. Florida, Georgia, North and South Carolina, and Virginia

      1920. Arizona and Utah

      1921. Arizona, California,...

    • EXPLANATION OF THE CODE USED IN THE FOLLOWING TABULATIONS
      (pp. 32-32)

      In the first column of the tables will be found the botanical names of the plants concerned, which have, so far as possible, been brought into agreement with theInternational Rules of Nomenclature. The omission of a species name indicates that because of poorness of material, lack of the essential flowering and fruiting parts, or some other reason the plant in question could not be completely identified. All the specimens upon which the data are based have been preserved, however, and are available to anyone wishing to make further determinations upon them.

      The chemical number refers to the number given...

    • WESTERN UNITED STATES AND THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS
      (pp. 33-134)
    • EASTERN UNITED STATES AND JAMAICA
      (pp. 135-218)
  5. PART III. DESCRIPTIONS OF STATIONS AT WHICH SPECIMENS WERE COLLECTED
    • COMMON NAMES USED IN THE STATION DESCRIPTIONS WITH THEIR BOTANICAL EQUIVALENTS
      (pp. 221-221)
    • WESTERN UNITED STATES AND THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS
      (pp. 222-269)
    • EASTERN UNITED STATES AND JAMAICA
      (pp. 270-298)
  6. INDEX TO EXPERIMENTAL DATA
    (pp. 301-339)