The Marketing of Farm Products

The Marketing of Farm Products: Studies in the Organization of the Twin Cities Market

EDITED BY H. BRUCE PRICE
Copyright Date: 1927
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 448
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttsnn9
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  • Book Info
    The Marketing of Farm Products
    Book Description:

    The Marketing of Farm Products was first published in 1927. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. Fourteen specialists, including Professor John D. Black of Harvard University, and Dr. Holbrook Working, economist of the Stanford University Food Research Institute cooperated in these studies under the editorship of Professor H. Bruce Price. The book is designed as a text for use in high schools and college classes in agricultural economics and is equipped with references for reading, tables, charts, maps, and an index. In addition to chapters describing the organization of the Minneapolis-St. Paul market for grain, hay, livestock, potatoes, dairy products, fruits, and vegetables, there are included discussions of the historical geographical, and theoretical aspects of the subject. It will prove a valuable reference work also for businessmen, and producers and consumers of farm products in the Twin Cities market area—a territory extending west and north into Montana and Canada, and east and south into Wisconsin and Iowa._x000B_

    eISBN: 978-1-4529-3819-6
    Subjects: Business

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. LIST OF FIGURES
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. LIST OF TABLES
    (pp. ix-xiii)
  5. I. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-8)
    H. Bruce Price

    The organization for marketing a product is generally made up of a large number of business concerns. Wholesalers, commission merchants, brokers, jobbers, retail stores, market news agencies, inspection departments, storage warehouses, and transportation companies are some of the principal agencies. However, not all of these types of middleman are found in every market. Frequently they are not discovered in different markets for the same product. To illustrate, official inspection of butter is unknown at the present time in small wholesale butter markets, whereas there is federal inspection of this product in several of the large central wholesole markets; grain brokers...

  6. II. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE TWIN CITIES AS A MARKET FOR FARM PRODUCTS
    (pp. 9-44)
    Mildred Hartsough

    The early history of Minneapolis-St. Paul as a market for farm products centers about wheat and the milling industry. The first merchant mill was built at St. Anthony Falls in 1854. Most of the wheat for this mill, however, came from the south, some from as far south as Iowa. The people living in the immediate vicinity were still mostly traders and lumbermen. It was, therefore, a deficit area. But after 1855, settlers came in large numbers, at first, largely from the older states, but presently from Germany, Norway, and Sweden, and gradually filled up the southern part of the...

  7. III. SOME PROBLEMS OF THE MINNEAPOLIS GRAIN MARKETING ORGANIZATION
    (pp. 45-107)
    H. Bruce Price

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss some of the problems of grain marketing in Minneapolis, special consideration being given to the organization and methods of marketing. Owing to the small amount of grain marketed in St. Paul, the discussion will be confined to the Minneapolis part of the market.

    The Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce is a voluntary association of individuals engaged in the grain, milling, and linseed oil business. It is the trade association of the Minneapolis grain business. It was organized in 1881 and incorporated under a Minnesota statute authorizing the incorporation of such local associations for...

  8. IV. MARKETING LIVESTOCK AT SOUTH ST. PAUL
    (pp. 108-149)
    Edwin W. Gaumnitz

    South St. Paul, the principal livestock market of the Northwest, is located south of St. Paul on the Mississippi River. Available records do not enable us to give the year from which the market dates. The St. Paul Union Stockyards Company, however, was organized in 1888. The early trading was chiefly in livestock that was purchased for local slaughter and consumption in Minneapolis and St. Paul. As the territory west and northwest of St. Paul was tapped by the railroads, the livestock receipts increased, and the market gradually lost its municipal character and became a terminal market. This transformation may...

  9. V. THE MINNEAPOLIS AND ST. PAUL HAY MARKET
    (pp. 150-177)
    Carle C. Zimmerman

    From the standpoint of economics and price adjustments the Twin Cities hay market is one market. Physically, this market is divided into three parts, which actually receive and handle hay separately; but these parts interact with each other in such a way as to make one market. These three parts are the St. Paul market, the Minneapolis market, and the stockyards market at South St. Paul.

    From the first of January to December 21, 1922, this Twin Cities hay and straw market received 7,469 cars of hay and straw, 6,843 of which were consumed in the area tributary by local...

  10. VI. ORGANIZATION OF THE FRUIT AND VEGETABLE MARKET
    (pp. 178-200)
    C. M. Arthur and Abner L. Johnson

    The organization for marketing fruits and vegetables in the Twin Cities is typical of the organization in most cities of a similar size. Minneapolis and St. Paul are primarily consuming markets for most fruits and vegetables here marketed; they are also important concentration points for others for later dispersion to other markets. However, the location of these cities in the heart of a great cereal and livestock producing district, where fruit and vegetable growing does not fit into the systems of extensive agriculture practiced, makes them primarily consuming markets. The most important exception to this generalization is potatoes, which are...

  11. VII. THE MINNEAPOLIS CENTRAL PUBLIC MARKET
    (pp. 201-227)
    Abner L. Johnson

    Public markets are usually a part of the organization for food distribution in large cities and they are not uncommon in small cities and large towns. They may be classified on the basis of structural equipment asopenmarkets orenclosedmarkets; on the basis of method of sale as beingwholesalemarkets orretailmarkets; and on the basis of ownership as beingmunicipalmarkets,privatemarkets, orcooperativemarkets.

    The open, wholesale markets are the typicalfarmers’ markets in most sections of the country. They are usually located at street curbs or on tracts of ground especially set...

  12. VIII. THE ST. PAUL PUBLIC MARKET
    (pp. 228-247)
    Claud F. Clayton

    St. Paul had a public market even prior to the city’s incorporation in 1854. It was not until 1869, however, that the public market place was established by ordinance. In 1879 the state legislature authorized the city council to issue bonds not exceeding $40,000 for the purpose of erecting a public market building. The building, located at Seventh and Wabasha Streets, was completed February 18, 1881, at a cost of $85,000.¹ This market was of the enclosed type. There were stalls along the building and an alley for teams back of the building.

    This site, however, soon became too valuable...

  13. IX. THE AUCTION AS A METHOD OF SALE FOR FRUIT IN MINNEAPOLIS
    (pp. 248-258)
    Charles B. Howe

    The auction was first used in this country in 1847 as a method of sale for fruits.¹ The first fruit auction in Minneapolis was started by the Grinell-Collins Company in 1885, but this company went out of business shortly after that time, and the Geo. C. Sherman Company took over the auction function. Both of these companies handled the auction as a sideline to a regular commission and brokerage business. The Minneapolis Fruit Auction Company, established in 1903, with a capital stock of $10,000, handled fruit auctioning as a separate function. The present organization, the Fruit Auction Company, was established...

  14. X. THE TWIN CITIES POTATO MARKET
    (pp. 259-282)
    E. C. Johnson

    The state of Minnesota ranks among the leading potato-producing states, producing in the year 1924, according to government crop reports, 44,352,000 bushels of potatoes. Furthermore, the Twin Cities are important railroad terminals for the entire Northwest, the bulk of carlot potatoes shipped from North Dakota and Montana being billed to this point or passing through on the way to other markets. The Minneapolis-St. Paul market is thus found to be an important market concentration point for potatoes. The arrivals in 1924, according to Table 28, were 3711 cars at Minneapolis and 414 cars at St. Paul. These figures do not...

  15. XI. THE TWIN CITIES BUTTER MARKET
    (pp. 283-319)
    Edmund M. Daggit

    The Twin Cities butter market ranks third among the butter markets of the United States from the standpoint of volume of butter handled. Those of higher rank are New York and Chicago. The close proximity of the Twin Cities to the well developed dairy regions of central and southern Minnesota and western Wisconsin, and to the rapidly developing dairy regions of northern Minnesota and northern Wisconsin, is the factor which contributes most to its importance.

    As a producing center.—The creameries of the Twin Cities produced 22,058,337 pounds of butter in 1923, of which 13,088,648 pounds were produced in St....

  16. XII. DISTRIBUTION OF MILK IN THE TWIN CITIES
    (pp. 320-345)
    Warren C. Waite

    The purpose of this chapter is to present a description of the manner in which milk is distributed in the Twin Cities. The problems connected with the distribution of milk are important largely because of its extreme perishability and the close connection of the public health with the cleanliness of milk. Unless properly handled, milk is likely to be unfit for human consumption within twenty-four hours. Most of the milk consumed in the Cities is much older.

    The daily consumption of milk in the Twin Cities is around 70,000 gallons. In addition, about 6,500 gallons of cream are used. Of...

  17. XIII. COLD STORAGE IN THE TWIN CITIES
    (pp. 346-363)
    Warren C. Waite and Edmund M. Daggit

    Agricultural production is of such a character that it is impossible to maintain a continuous flow of goods to the market out of new production. The entire year’s stock of many commodities is produced during a comparatively short period, and in the time between these production periods, the demands of consumers can be met only out of this stock. Even those agricultural products which are produced continuously throughout the year are subject to great variability in their volume of production. At certain periods there is a great abundance of supply out of new production, and at other times a relative...

  18. XIV. RURAL MOTOR TRUCK LINES IN THE TWIN CITIES
    (pp. 364-389)
    Russell C. Engberg

    Statistics published by the National Automobile Chamber of Commerce, Inc. bring out the fact that at the end of 1920 there were nearly 3,000 motorized express lines and that, of these, nearly 1,000 were organized in 1920.¹ These data give some idea of the tremendous development of this new mode of transportation since the days of the war. They also suggest a new method by which farm products may be sent to market. Not all of these lines areruralexpress lines, to be sure, but on the other hand, an express line cannot operate on a very extensive scale...

  19. XV. THE FUNCTION OF TWIN CITIES MARKETS IN DETERMINING PRICES
    (pp. 390-402)
    Holbrook Working

    Preceding chapters have discussed the organization and operation of the various markets in the Twin Cities and methods of price quotation in each. We may now consider briefly what are the forces which operate through this market machinery and how they determine the prices quoted. In their general characteristics these forces are similar for all the different commodities, although certain important differences in details must be noted.

    The great bulk of the sales on Twin Cities markets takes place at prices determined under competitive bidding in an open market, although there is a certain percentage of sales in most of...

  20. XVI. THE GEOGRAPHY OF THE TWIN CITIES MARKET AREA FOR FARM PRODUCTS
    (pp. 403-430)
    J. D. Black

    It is now in order to consider the present relations between the Twin Cities and the area from which they draw their supplies of raw materials and produce and which in turn they supply with products more nearly ready for consumption. Such an analysis becomes essentially a study in geography, interpreting this term broadly so as to take into account economic as well as climatic, topographical, and other physical relations.

    Any large metropolitan center like the Twin Cities is first of all a receiving point for a large quantity of locally grown vegetables and fruits, and locally produced milk, butter,...

  21. INDEX
    (pp. 431-435)