Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology

Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology: Volume 10

ANNE D. PICK EDITOR
DONALD M. BAER
TRUDILEE G. ROWBURY
ELIZABETH M. GOETZ
ANN L. BROWN
EDITH D. NEIMARK
ARTHUR H. PARMALEE
MARIAN SIGMAN
ROBERT L. SELMAN
STEPHEN J. SUOMI
Copyright Date: 1976
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 256
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttsns3
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  • Book Info
    Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology
    Book Description:

    Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology: Volume 10 was first published in 1976. This volume, the tenth in the series of Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology, is based on papers given at the 1975 symposium sponsored by the Institute of Child Development at the University of Minnesota. Anne D. Pick, the editor, is Professor Emerita at the Institute. She writes an introduction to the volume. There are six chapters by nine contributors from various universities. The subjects cover a considerable range of research problems in child development. The contributors: Donald M. Baer, Roy A. Roberts Professor of Human Development, University of Kansas; Trudilee G. Rowbury, assistant professor and laboratory supervisor, Edna Hill Child Development Laboratory, University of Kansas; Ann L. Brown, associate professor of psychology, University of Illinois; Edith D. Neimark, research psychologist, Douglass College, Rutgers University; Arthur H. Parmalee, Jr., head, Division of Child Development, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, Los Angeles; Marian Sigman, research fellow in the Department of Experimental Psychology, Oxford University, England; Robert L. Selman, Laboratory of Human Development, Harvard Graduate School of Education, and director of education, Manville School, Judge Baker Child Guidance Center; and Stephen J. Suomi, assistant professor of psychology, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

    eISBN: 978-0-8166-6401-6
    Subjects: Psychology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Preface
    (pp. v-x)
    Anne D. Pick
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. xi-2)
  4. Behavioral Traps in the Preschool: A Proposal for Research
    (pp. 3-27)
    DONALD M. BAER, TRUDILEE G. ROWBURY and ELIZABETH M. GOETZ

    A trap is commonly known as a device for catching an animal rather than for catching a behavior. But this is only an oversight in popular usage: behaviors can be trapped; some behaviors need trapping; and the analysis of the psychological environment as a collection of behavioral traps may yield considerable profit to education, therapy, and behavior theory.

    Most of us have a suitably pragmatic view of one basic trap, namely the mousetrap. We rarely consider the mousetrap from a behavioral point of view, yet we use it essentially for behavior modification. It is not the existence of house mice...

  5. The Construction of Temporal Succession by Preoperational Children
    (pp. 28-83)
    ANN L. BROWN

    Understanding time is an essential prerequisite for the development of scientific thought; yet there is considerable evidence that a mature conception of time is late in developing and, indeed, is fragile even in adults (Piaget, 1966, 1970a). Traditionally, the nature of time has been the subject of considerable philosophical speculation that cannot concern us here. From the viewpoint of a developmental psychologist, however, it is useful to distinguish between relativistic notions of time and more traditional theories, such as those of Kant (1934) and Descartes (1825). Within the framework of traditional theories, time is seen as a necessary condition for...

  6. The Natural History of Spontaneous Mnemonic Activities under Conditions of Minimal Experimental Constraint
    (pp. 84-118)
    EDITH D. NEIMARK

    In the work I am going to describe, I am attempting to answer two seemingly simple and straightforward questions: How do people go about committing material to memory when left to their own devices? How does the nature of that activity change with age? The most probable reader response to those two questions is either (a) Don’t we already know that? or (b) Why should we want to know that? As might be expected, the posing of these two rhetorical questions prefaces a long-winded answer.

    Don’t We Already Know That?Most persons would assume that after almost 100 years of...

  7. Development of Visual Behavior and Neurological Organization in Pre-Term and Full-Term Infants
    (pp. 119-155)
    ARTHUR H. PARMELEE JR. and MARIAN SIGMAN

    The premature birth of an infant provides a unique opportunity for studying the organization of the nervous system and of behavior in their simplest forms and for following their evolution during a period of rapid development. By systematic comparisons of the ontogeny of behavior in pre-term and full-term infants it is possible to consider the problem of the relative contributions of brain maturation and experience very early in life.

    The level of organization of the nervous system constrains the amount and manner of information processing and the form of response expression and thereby the variety of interactions with the environment....

  8. Toward a Structural Analysis of Developing Interpersonal Relations Concepts: Research with Normal and Disturbed Preadolescent Boys
    (pp. 156-200)
    ROBERT L. SELMAN

    Developmental child psychology involves by definition a basic and healthy tension. On one side is the concern of developmental theory and research for an abstract understanding of basic psychological phenomena; on the other side is the reality of the child, who as the object of study requires a concreteness of description. In our research we have addressed ourselves to both abstract and concrete facets of developmental child psychology. In this chapter the concrete “child psychology” object of concern is the description of changes in the child’s conceptions of interpersonal relations as he or she approaches adolescence. In terms of developmental...

  9. Mechanisms Underlying Social Development: A Reexamination of Mother-Infant Interactions in Monkeys
    (pp. 201-228)
    STEPHEN J. SUOMI

    There is common agreement among behavioral researchers that methodology is a major difficulty for child developmentalists, largely because of the nature of the subject population. Human neonates, infants, and young children, despite their obvious wide incidence throughout the populated world, may well be the most intractable of all subjects available to the behavioral researcher. Virtually every society vigorously protects what it considers to be the welfare of its youngest, allegedly helpless, members. As one consequence, the range of experimentation that can ethically be performed on immature humans is severely limited. In particular, experimental manipulations that produce longterm developmental and/or adult...

  10. List of Contributors
    (pp. 231-234)
  11. Index
    (pp. 237-241)