An Historical Basis for Unemployment Insurance

An Historical Basis for Unemployment Insurance

Industrial Relations Counselors, Inc.
Volume: 21
Copyright Date: 1934
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 312
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttsqn4
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  • Book Info
    An Historical Basis for Unemployment Insurance
    Book Description:

    An Historical Basis for Unemployment Insurance was first published in 1934. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. This is volume one of a two-volume study of unemployment insurance. The authors present a thorough and up-to-date analysis of systems of unemployment relief that have been tried in Great Britain, Germany, Belgium, and Switzerland, also the voluntary plans that have been worked out in the United States and the legislative plans that have been proposed. The European systems are compared with respect to basis of coverage, eligibility of the unemployed to receive benefits, source of insurance funds, amount and period of benefits, and administration. Definite trends in unemployment insurance are pointed out, and their application to proposed plans for the protection of American workers is considered. It is indispensable to all who are interested in unemployment insurance plans.

    eISBN: 978-1-4529-3791-5
    Subjects: Economics

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. PART I. THE DEVELOPMENT OF UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE

    • I. THE STAGES IN DEVELOPMENT
      (pp. 3-10)

      The first departure from the age-old policy of providing public aid for the unemployed entirely on a relief basis was made less than a half century ago. The growth of the insurance principle, against the background of public relief, from trade union efforts to local insurance measures, and finally to national systems, is not a clean-cut development; the successive forms are not mutually exclusive but often coexistent and overlapping.

      In the sixteenth century, when the introduction of large-scale sheep farming displaced thousands of men from the land in Great Britain, the English poor law originated, and the parishes, with varying...

    • II. DEVELOPMENT IN VARIOUS EUROPEAN COUNTRIES
      (pp. 11-63)

      The first national system of compulsory unemployment insurance was set up in Great Britain in 1911 by authority of Part II of the National Insurance Act. It functions under the management and control of the Ministry of Labor, with the assistance of three governmental departments. Compulsory with respect to the industries covered, it includes almost the entire wage-earning population in industry. The resources of the system, centered in a national pool, are derived in equal amounts from workers, employers, and the national treasury. Two types of benefit are provided: insurance benefit, depending upon contributions paid, the cost of which is...

    • III. DEVELOPMENT IN THE UNITED STATES
      (pp. 64-76)

      The industrial countries of Europe began late in the nineteenth century to turn toward insurance as a method of dealing with unemployment. The United States, however, except for a few voluntary unemployment insurance plans, depended up to the time of the present depression on the traditional means, public relief and private charity. The charity organization societies founded in some of the larger cities after 1880 were established in the hope that charity might be stripped of certain of its defects, be administered more efficiently, and cause less demoralization among its recipients. Other constructive steps to relieve unemployment were the establishment...

  4. PART II. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF LAWS AND PLANS IN VARIOUS COUNTRIES

    • IV. ANALYSIS OF THE PROVISIONS OF CERTAIN EUROPEAN LAWS
      (pp. 79-164)

      British unemployment insurance, when it was begun experimentally in 1911, covered only 2,500,000 workers in a few selected manual trades having a high and a similar incidence of unemployment. The trades included mechanical engineering, building, iron founding, shipbuilding, construction of vehicles, sawmilling, and machine work. Industries ordinarily working on short time, such as cotton manufacturing and coal mining, were excluded, because benefit for such industries would have been a subsidy to organized short time.

      In 1916 the government looked ahead to the unemployment that would accompany demobilization of the armed forces, and brought within the system workers engaged on or...

    • V. ANALYSIS OF EXISTING AND PROPOSED PLANS IN THE UNITED STATES
      (pp. 165-194)

      Since the first company unemployment benefit plan was announced in 1916, thirty-eight companies have introduced such schemes, or plans guaranteeing employment, but seven firms had given them up by 1933. One of the remaining plans is subscribed to by three companies and another by nineteen. All known plans are discussed in the sections which follow.

      Ten joint agreements including unemployment benefit features were reported to be operating at the close of 1932, but several of them were not paying benefits because of lack of funds and most of the others were on a relief basis. The scheme in the men’s...

  5. APPENDIXES

    • Appendix I — Conversion Rates of Foreign Money
      (pp. 197-197)
    • Appendix II — Analysis of the Provisions of the National Unemployment Insurance Systems in Great Britain, Germany, Belgium, and Switzerland, as of October, 1933
      (pp. 198-229)
    • Appendix III — Detailed Analysis of Existing and Proposed Plans in the United States
      (pp. 230-275)
    • Appendix IV — Tables on Which Figures 1 to 5 Are Based
      (pp. 276-284)
    • Appendix V — Payroll, Contributions, and Benefits Paid by Companies with Unemployment Benefit Plans in the United States, from Inception of Each Plan through 1933
      (pp. 285-290)
  6. SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 293-296)
  7. INDEX
    (pp. 299-306)