A Guide to the Spring Flowers of Minnesota

A Guide to the Spring Flowers of Minnesota

CARL OTTO ROSENDAHL
FREDERIC K. BUTTERS
Copyright Date: 1937
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 112
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttsvxc
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  • Book Info
    A Guide to the Spring Flowers of Minnesota
    Book Description:

    A Guide to the Spring Flowers of Minnesota was first published in 1937. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. This well-known students’ handbook contains fully illustrated keys, a glossary, and indexes of the common and scientific names of both the native and the cultivated flowers of the state. While the authors make no claim to its completeness beyond the boundaries of Minnesota, the guide will be found useful in adjacent states._x000B_

    eISBN: 978-1-4529-3825-7
    Subjects: Botany & Plant Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. PREFACE TO THE SEVENTH EDITION
    (pp. iii-iv)
    Carl Otto Rosendahl and Frederic K. Butters
  3. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. v-xii)

    In botanical practice the name of a plant is made up of two words, for example, Anemone canadensis, Phlox pilosa, and so on. The first word represents the genus or group to which the plant belongs and is always written with a capital letter. The second word indicates the species or kind and is rarely capitalized. The meaning of the terms genus and species and the manner in which they are used can be made clear by the following illustration. In Minnesota there are three native kinds or species of pine, viz., the white pine, the Norway pine, and the...

  4. KEY TO FAMILIES
    (pp. xiii-xvii)
  5. KEY TO GENERA OF DOUBLE FLOWERS
    (pp. xviii-xviii)
  6. Spermatophytes Flowering Plants
    (pp. 1-75)

    Resinous trees or shrubs, usually evergreen; flowers monoecious, cone-like; the staminate consisting of an axis bearing numerous spirally arranged, scale-like stamens; the pistillate consisting of an axis bearing spirally arranged scales in a double series, each fertile scale standing in the axil of a bract and bearing 2 inverted naked ovules on its upper side; fruit a cone with hard, dry, spirally arranged, fertile scales, the bracts very obvious or entirely concealed by the fertile scales.

    I. Foliage leaves all scattered, alternate

    1. Leaves flat, linear, more or less twisted into two ranks

    a. Buds small, round, resinous; cones upright...

  7. [Illustrations]
    (pp. 76-82)
  8. GLOSSARY
    (pp. 83-88)
  9. INDEX
    (pp. 89-91)