Extra-Curricular Activities at the University of Minnesota

Extra-Curricular Activities at the University of Minnesota

F. STUART CHAPIN
Assisted by O. MYKING MEHUS
Copyright Date: 1929
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 150
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttt39k
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  • Book Info
    Extra-Curricular Activities at the University of Minnesota
    Book Description:

    Extra-Curricular Activities at the University of Minnesota was first published in 1929. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. This comprehensive survey, conducted under Professor Chapin’s direction, supplies factual data in a field in which opinion is strong and conflicting. The report is based on the replies of 4,637 students, 408 alumni, and 156 campus organizations. Of exceptional interest are studies of special groups such as 379 “prominent” students, 112 honor students, 904 officers of campus organizations; of the relation between the intensity of extra-curricular activity and scholastic achievement; of the time actually spent in extra-curricular activity; of the “death rate” of campus organizations; and of the extent to which alumni carry over in community life the activities of their college years.

    eISBN: 978-1-4529-3761-8
    Subjects: Education

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-x)
  3. CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-5)

    The purpose of this study is to describe the social and educational aspects of extra-curricular activities of students at the University of Minnesota. Before making the preliminary preparations for this study, articles that had been written on the general subject of extra-curricular activities were examined and classified. In 1923, Elbert K. Fretwell of Columbia University compiled a bibliography on extra-curricular activities.¹ Most of these studies, however, referred to high-school investigations or articles based on opinions and lacking any scientific data. There had been only two investigations made in institutions of higher learning. One was a limited study made at Purdue...

  4. CHAPTER II STUDENT EXTRA-CURRICULAR ORGANIZATIONS ON THE CAMPUS
    (pp. 6-16)

    To secure data on the extra-curricular organizations existing on the campus at the University of Minnesota in 1924-25, a questionnaire (see Appendix II) was prepared and sent to each of these organizations. All together, 306 organizations were listed in the files of the Dean of Student Affairs and each of these organizations was circularized. Of this number, 151 returned questionnaires. This is a little less than 50 per cent, but since many of the 306 organizations that were listed were not functioning in 1924-25, the percentage of returns from the active organizations is much over 50.

    The 1926Gopher, the...

  5. CHAPTER III STUDENT PARTICIPATION IN DIFFERENT TYPES OF ACTIVITY
    (pp. 17-36)

    In Chapter II the vitality and survival of different kinds of campus organizations was discussed. In this chapter our task is to present the facts of student participation¹ in each type of activity. In what numbers and percentages do students participate in athletics, fraternities, musical organizations, earning money, and so on through the whole list of twenty-two different types of activity?

    First, let us consider the three colleges from which the largest number of student questionnaires² were returned, namely, the College of Science, Literature, and the Arts; the College of Education; and the College of Engineering. Tables III, IV, and...

  6. CHAPTER IV DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS ACCORDING TO NUMBER OF ACTIVITIES IN WHICH THEY PARTICIPATE
    (pp. 37-46)

    In order to discover how the students were distributed according to the number of activities in which they participated, the following procedure was used: first, the 4,637 questionnaires were grouped according to the different colleges represented by the students. Then the questionnaires were again divided into the four classes, freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior.¹ The next step was to divide according to men and women in each class. Finally, each student was placed in one of eight groups according to the extent of participation, whether in no activity, one activity, two activities, and so on up to seven or more...

  7. CHAPTER V STUDENT LEADERS: A STUDY OF PROMINENT AND HONOR STUDENTS AND OFFICERS
    (pp. 47-63)

    The questionnaires that were sent to each student organization on the campus contained a request to list the ten most active or prominent members in that particular organization. In this way we hoped to be able to make a separate tabulation of students who were especially prominent on the campus according to the judgment of the students themselves. In addition to this information, we took the members who were elected to the Grey Friars, Iron Wedge, and Silver Spur, and included them in the prominent group, as these students are elected on the basis of their prominence in campus activities....

  8. CHAPTER VI STUDENT ACTIVITY AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT
    (pp. 64-78)

    In the preceding chapters we have considered the participation of students in extra-curricular activities of different kinds, but the relation of these activities to academic achievement was not studied because comparable data could not be obtained on such a large scale. Observers of student activity have held different opinions regarding the effects of extreme participation on study and academic achievement. To test this relationship we selected three sample groups for comparison and detailed analysis.

    Sample Group A consists of 321 men and women who returned estimates of the time spent on activities, in addition to reporting on the number of...

  9. CHAPTER VII THE TIME STUDENTS SPEND ON ACTIVITIES
    (pp. 79-89)

    In addition to indicating on the questionnaire activities in which they took part, the students were also requested to indicate how much time they spent on each activity per quarter.¹ A large number of students failed to do this, and those who did fill out the number of hours spent on each activity necessarily had to give estimates only, as none had kept a careful record of how much time he actually spent on the different activities. However, in taking the median of the number of hours given for each activity, we feel that we obtain a fairly reliable figure...

  10. CHAPTER VIII THE CARRY-OVER OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES INTO CORRESPONDING COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES OF ALUMNI
    (pp. 90-110)

    Do students active in extra-curricular affairs tend to apply their talent for participation or their habits of social activity acquired in student days to the affairs of after life, and as alumni participate in organized social groups more actively than do students who were inactive when in college? It was thought that those who were graduated ten or fifteen years ago would be in a position to give an answer to this question. It was decided to divide these alumni into two groups—one group of those who were especially active in extra-curricular activities while they attended the University, and...

  11. CHAPTER IX GENERAL CONCLUSIONS
    (pp. 111-118)

    Such a mass of complicated statistical data has been presented in the preceding chapters that a general summary of conclusions seems desirable if we are to appreciate the social and educational significance of this survey.

    At the outset it is worth repeating that the study was originally undertaken with the purpose of attempting to measure the social and educational values of extra-curricular activities. As the study progressed it soon became apparent that we could not hope to devise techniques for the measurement of social and educational values until a comprehensive survey of the facts could be made. The study resolved...

  12. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 119-126)
  13. APPENDIX I PRELIMINARY QUESTIONNAIRE
    (pp. 129-130)
  14. APPENDIX II ORGANIZATION QUESTIONNAIRE
    (pp. 131-132)
  15. APPENDIX III ALUMNI QUESTIONNAIRE
    (pp. 133-138)
  16. APPENDIX IV SUGGESTED FURTHER EXTRA-CURRICULAR STUDIES
    (pp. 139-140)