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The Small City and Town

The Small City and Town: A Conference on Community Relations

EDITED BY ROLAND S. VAILE
Copyright Date: 1930
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 172
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttt3b1
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  • Book Info
    The Small City and Town
    Book Description:

    The Small City and Town was first published in 1930. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. This volume presents papers originally presented to a 1929 conference on community relations held at the University of Minnesota. The conference was designed to assess the place of the small city and town in the modern economic organization. Topics of discussion are devoted to the economic relationships of the small town including: banking; merchandising and manufacturing; forestry; highways and transit; public media; school systems; and budgetary and accounting procedure. In total, the conference proceedings point toward the outline of a program for community engineering and administration._x000B_

    eISBN: 978-1-4529-3850-9
    Subjects: Sociology

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. REPORT OF A CONFERENCE ON PROBLEMS OF THE SMALL CITY AND TOWN
    (pp. 1-23)
  4. I. A GENERAL INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 24-37)
    Russell A. Stevenson

    Our notions of the small town have been quite definitely fixed from the impressions gained in earlier years. There has grown up in our minds a conception of the typical American town as it existed a quarter of a century ago. We have noted the changes that have been taking place in these communities with a tinge of regret. This is caused by the fact that we have been educated to oppose, consciously or unconsciously, changes in the things to which we have become accustomed. We have been trained to think traditionally and to act traditionally. Therefore, many of us...

  5. II. INTEGRATION AND THE SMALL TOWN
    (pp. 38-42)
    Roland S. Vaile

    “It is inevitable that the business of the country shall be done by very large companies which reach back to the source and, taking the raw materials, carry them through the necessary processes to the finished state.” Thus has Henry Ford characterized the trend of modern business, and there is much evidence to support his prophecy.

    The movement towards integration appears in at least four distinct forms:

    1. Consumer cooperation, in which consumers reach backwards to control the merchandising and, in many instances, the manufacturing of the commodities which they desire.

    2. Large merchant enterprises, such as chain stores, mail-order houses, and...

  6. III. RETAIL BUSINESS IN THE SMALL TOWN
    (pp. 43-48)
    Paul D. Converse

    I started on a study of business in the small town in Illinois to ascertain how the small town merchants were progressing since the advent of the automobile and the building of paved roads. Many business papers were stating that the automobiles were concentrating business in the county seats and similar towns, and that the small town was doomed. Why would people trade in small village stores when in an hour, more or less, they could be in good trading-center stores? I read this statement so often that I assumed the statement was correct and repeated it myself.

    One day...

  7. IV. THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MERCHANDISING STANDARDS FOR THE RETAIL STORE
    (pp. 49-54)
    V. H. Pelz

    Standards for measuring the relative effectiveness of retail store operation and management are constantly changing. Broadly speaking, the term standards may mean two somewhat different things: (1) A measurement of what constitutes good practice, sound policy, satisfactory results in terms of profit and loss; (2) A statement of the present-day basic competitive conditions to which practice, policy, and relationships in distribution must be adjusted if the individual store is to survive or to have a satisfactory measure of success.

    Until the past year or two, standards of practice in retail store management centered largely around internal store management, with relatively...

  8. V. INTEGRATION IN BANKING IN RELATION TO THE PUBLIC INTEREST
    (pp. 55-61)
    Arthur W. Marget

    The facts registering a movement towards integration in the commercial banking structure of the United States are almost too well known to require rehearsal. The last ten years have witnessed bank consolidations in both urban and rural areas, on a scale unparalleled in history. The branch-banking question, long a sore point in discussions of legislative regulation of banks, has been postponed, not solved, by the McFadden Act of 1927. The movement towards chain banking has taken on a momentum, particularly in states like Minnesota in which branch banking is forbidden by law, such as to challenge the closest attention on...

  9. VI. BANKING IN THE SMALL TOWN
    (pp. 62-65)
    A. J. Veigel

    There are 379 state banks in Minnesota with a minimum capital of $10,000. Nearly all of these are located in small villages, some of which are not even incorporated. We have about 30 banks with less than $50,000 in deposits, and about 140, including the 30, with less than $100,000 in deposits.

    The mere fact that a bank is small does not mean that it is not safe. Some of our small, so-called oneman banks are absolutely clean and safe. It all depends upon the management of the bank. Ordinarily, however, the bank with larger deposits, and, therefore, larger earnings...

  10. VII. BANKING TRENDS IN THE RURAL COMMUNITIES OF MINNESOTA, 1915–1928
    (pp. 66-70)
    Oliver S. Powell

    One of the problems of the small town is the problem of adequate and safe banking facilities. The present study was undertaken to determine certain country banking trends in Minnesota from 1915 to 1928, inclusive, which have a bearing on the above problem. The source of the deposits information used was the Rand McNally Bankers Directory for January of each year from 1916 to 1929. Deposits in the state were subdivided according to the size of the towns in 1920. Data for the cities of Minneapolis, St. Paul, and Duluth were omitted. Although the conference is specifically interested in conditions...

  11. VIII. MANUFACTURING IN THE SMALL TOWN
    (pp. 71-77)
    Roy L. Emry

    Every town in this country of whatever size has a vision of becoming a great manufacturing center. To prove this statement, you have only to broach at any meeting of any commercial club or chamber of commerce the advisability of securing an industry or factory. You have the instant attention of every man present. Geographical location, natural resources, raw materials, the market, labor supply, transportation, all the vital factors that insure the success or failure of an industrial project are disregarded. They see only a big chimney pouring forth clouds of smoke and a crowd of happy and contented workmen...

  12. IX. THE PROBLEM OF ASSOCIATED EFFORT IN THE SMALL TOWN
    (pp. 78-79)
    Frederick C. Wagner

    At the present time there is an urgent need for effective associated effort in the small town. The coming of the automobile and the good roads has made it increasingly necessary not only for group effort within the town but also for the town at times to act as a unit. Since the people of the rural districts are becoming more and more urbanized, the town that acts as their trading center must also urbanize itself if it is to get its due share of the trade. This requires associated effort.

    The present program of associated effort in the town...

  13. X. THE AGRICULTURAL SITUATION AND THE SMALL TOWN
    (pp. 80-82)
    Walter C. Coffey

    Significant changes have taken place in American agriculture in recent years. The greater and more skilful application of mechanical power to improved farm machinery has increased the output per farm laborer from 20 to 40 per cent since the outbreak of the World War in 1914. This means that fewer people are required to farm a given area than were needed twenty years ago. When farm laborers are replaced by machines, it is not customary for some other country enterprise, or at least some other farm enterprise, to absorb them. Undoubtedly there are many agricultural sections that have fewer people...

  14. XI. AN INCOME-PRODUCING PUBLIC ENTERPRISE: TOWN FORESTS
    (pp. 83-84)
    Henry Schmitz

    There are literally millions of acres of idle or semi-idle lands in Minnesota. A considerable portion of this area is tax delinquent. By and large all idle land should be put back to work to produce some form of revenue and to pay taxes. In many townships and in the immediate environs of many cities and towns, land, suitable for town forest purposes, is available. Town forests, if of sufficient size, may become important sources of income for maintaining local governments. In Europe, annual returns as high as $6.20 per acre have been obtained from such forests. In this day...

  15. XII. THE TRANSPORTATION PROBLEM OF THE NORTHWEST
    (pp. 85-104)
    George R. Martin

    There are many definitions of transportation, but I think that the following simple one will answer our purpose; viz., “Transportation consists in moving goods from places where they are to places where they are wanted, and of moving people from places where they are to places to which they wish to go.” This is accomplished in four general ways: highways, waterways, railways, airways.

    While transportation by air is yet in its infancy, one who remembers the many statements that were made twenty-five years ago to the effect that automobiles were toys and would never be of importance in the transportation...

  16. XIII. THE HIGHWAYS AND THE SMALL TOWN
    (pp. 105-113)
    C. M. Babcock

    When the automobile came into general use and the good roads movement began in earnest, the comment was often heard that the good roads and the new vehicles would destroy the small town. It is quite apparent that the small towns have not been destroyed. We shall nevertheless watch the returns of the census to be taken in 1930 with a great deal of interest to see what really has happened to the smaller towns. That some towns have suffered through the changes that have taken place during the last ten years is quite apparent, but we also know of...

  17. XIV. MINNESOTA HIGHWAYS: TYPES AND CONSTRUCTION COSTS
    (pp. 114-117)
    O. L. Kipp

    There are five classes of highways in Minnesota. First are the so-called United States highways, comprising 2,762 miles of main interstate highways. These are part of the trunk highway system, under state control but marked with the United States numbers. Second is the state trunk highway system of 7,000 miles, this total including the United States highways. Trunk highways are under complete control of the state, both as to construction and maintenance, and are financed by motor vehicle fees, two-thirds of the gas tax, and federal aid. Third are the state-aid roads, with a total of 15,561 miles, under county...

  18. XV. WHAT’S HAPPENING TO MINNESOTA WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS
    (pp. 118-126)
    Bruce R. McCoy

    The field of the country newspaper lies in the open farm country and in towns with populations under 5,000. In Minnesota, 55 per cent of the population live in this field. Although the state ranks fifteen in point of population, it stands six in the number of weekly newspapers, being outranked in this point by Illinois, Texas, New York, Iowa, and Missouri.

    There are approximately 475 country weeklies in the 87 counties of Minnesota, an average of five or six to the county, although there is only one in Mahnomen County and thirteen each in Stearns and Ottertail counties.

    The...

  19. XVI. BROADCASTING AND THE SMALL TOWN
    (pp. 127-129)
    H. A. Bellows

    When I was a boy I lived in a small New England city. It was more than a small town; in fact, it was the largest city in the state of Maine, but none the less, it was far enough off the beaten path so that visitors outstanding in the world of ideas and of art were rather rare. I can well remember how excited the whole city was when, two or three times a year, it had a chance to hear some person of national distinction. About once in four or five years it was favored by a visit...

  20. XVII. THE SMALL TOWN’S EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
    (pp. 130-139)
    George A. Selke

    The educational program for a community, whether small town, open country, or urban center, can be determined only after a consideration of three essential factors:

    1. The educational resources of the community

    2. The educational needs of the community

    3. The educational will of the community

    The entire area of the state is divided into school districts, common, independent, independent-consolidated, ten-township, or county unorganized districts. Every small town is, therefore, located in a district of some kind. While the limits of some towns may be coterminous with or even beyond those of the school district, in most cases the boundaries of the school...

  21. XVIII. THE SCHOOLS OF LAKE COUNTY, MINNESOTA
    (pp. 140-142)
    C. E. Campton

    Lake County has already done and has made it possible to do the things which you people have just been talking about as possibilities for the future. The 1927 Legislature passed a law permitting Lake County, upon a vote of its people, to consolidate all its schools into one big district known as the County District of Lake County with a County Board of Education, one member of which is to be chosen from each commissioner district. This County Board of Education has jurisdiction over all the schools in the county. It will hire a superintendent of schools who shall...

  22. XIX. BUDGET AND ACCOUNTING PROCEDURE FOR A SMALL TOWN
    (pp. 143-148)
    George M. Link

    One of the indices of good administration of an organization is its financial plan. The ordinary title for such financial plan is the term “budget.” In the popular mind the meaning of the term is somewhat vague. There are probably very few who analyze the essentials of a financial plan sufficiently to have a clear understanding of what the term “budget” really means. Perhaps no better description can be had than the one prepared in 1923 by Professor William Anderson of the University of Minnesota. His statement is clear, concise, and comprehensive. I can do no better than to quote...

  23. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 149-159)