Eduard C. Lindeman and Social Work Philosophy

Eduard C. Lindeman and Social Work Philosophy

Gisela Konopka
Copyright Date: 1958
Edition: NED - New edition
DOI: 10.5749/j.ctttt3n2
Pages: 232
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttt3n2
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Eduard C. Lindeman and Social Work Philosophy
    Book Description:

    Eduard C. Lindeman, a leader in the field of social work for many years, was deeply concerned with the profession’s development of a basic philosophy. As a teacher at the New York School of Social Work for more than 25 years and as a prolific writer and consultant in a broad range of activities, Lindeman challenged old ideas and stimulated new ones in relation to the concepts and principles of social work. In this study of the man and his thinking, Mrs. Konopka, a professor of social work herself, provides an illuminated discussion of the theories upon which the practice of social work is based. In the first section Mrs. Konopka presents a biographical sketch of Lindeman, showing the forces and experiences which helped to shape his views and to create the ideas and ideals he fostered. Then she traces the development of Lindeman’s philosophy over the three decades of his most fruitful period, the years from 1920 to 1953, when he died. In the third part, as a background for an understanding of Lindeman’s contributions, she describes the status of social work values and goals before and during his career. In conclusion, she discusses a theory of social work based upon an integration of values, methods, and knowledge. This book will be especially useful to those teaching courses in the history and philosophy of social work and related professions, as well as to those actively engaged in social work.

    eISBN: 978-0-8166-6331-6
    Subjects: Philosophy

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
    DOI: 10.5749/j.ctttt3n2.1
  2. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. vii-viii)
    G.K.
    DOI: 10.5749/j.ctttt3n2.2
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. ix-2)
    DOI: 10.5749/j.ctttt3n2.3
  4. INTRODUCTION: THE IMPORTANCE OF A PHILOSOPHY FOR SOCIAL WORK
    (pp. 3-14)
    DOI: 10.5749/j.ctttt3n2.4

    The nations of the world are engaged in a race for technical supremacy. What is the principal purpose of the race? To prevent one nation—one part of humanity — from dominating or destroying another.

    Much intelligence and much energy are going into this effort. Yet it seems more important than ever that an even greater effort be made to achieve positive and mutually helpful human relations. This cannot be accomplished by harnessing technical forces, but only through man himself, working with other men.

    Among several others, the profession of social work makes an effort to improve human relations. And...

  5. PART ONE EDUARD C. LINDEMAN:: THE MAN IN HIS TIME
    • CHAPTER 1 THE FORMATIVE YEARS OF LINDEMANʹS LIFE
      (pp. 17-35)
      DOI: 10.5749/j.ctttt3n2.5

      In order to understand a philosophical point of view we must first learn about the person who represents it, for philosophy grows out of the experiences, the thinking, the feelings — and out of the precious, intangible, unique part of man of which we understand so little. What follows will not be a detailed biography of Eduard C. Lindeman, but a short presentation of his life against the background of the time in which he lived and the profession in which he worked for most of his adult life.

      All the friends, colleagues, and students of Lindeman whom I interviewed...

    • CHAPTER 2 TEACHER AT THE NEW YORK SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK
      (pp. 36-50)
      DOI: 10.5749/j.ctttt3n2.6

      In order to understand Lindeman’s position in a school of social work one must examine the development of such schools and of the profession. The years following World War I were the period when social work was consolidated as a profession with a specific body of knowledge and skills that differentiated it from other professions; this consolidation had begun in the early years of the century, but it was accelerated in the postwar years.

      Social workers were especially concerned at this time with casework, a concern that can be related to several factors. First, there were general and far-reaching social...

    • CHAPTER 3 SOCIAL ACTION AND CURRICULUM PLANNING
      (pp. 51-63)
      DOI: 10.5749/j.ctttt3n2.7

      With the depression and the emergent reforms of the Roosevelt administration, Lindeman became increasingly involved in government services. In 1934 he became the consulting director of the Division of Recreation of the Works Progress Administration. He described this experience and his resulting thinking in a book published in 1939,Leisure — A National Issue. Planning for the Leisure of a Democratic People. He considered leisure-time planning a part of social policy. He never looked upon recreation as an empty passing of time; rather, he believed that leisure provided an opportunity for people to feel free; he felt that they should...

    • CHAPTER 4 THE PROBLEMS OF WORLD WAR II AND ITS AFTERMATH
      (pp. 64-80)
      DOI: 10.5749/j.ctttt3n2.8

      The outbreak of the Second World War brought new problems, new concerns, and involvement in new and different activities. One of his problems was reconciling his humanitarian views with the cruel necessities of war. When, early in the war, former President Hoover was seeking support for his opposition to Roosevelt’s and Churchill’s plan to withhold food from enemy countries, Lindeman wrote to Mrs. Marion Beers Howden:

      The worst pressure I have had to bear in recent months has come from the Hoover Committee. They insist on having my name for their committee and I cannot bring myself to sign. But,...

  6. PART TWO THE DEVELOPMENT OF A PHILOSOPHY
    • CHAPTER 5 SOCIAL WORKʹS GOALS AND VALUES IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
      (pp. 83-101)
      DOI: 10.5749/j.ctttt3n2.9

      To understand the place of Eduard Lindeman’s thinking in social work we must first examine the development of values and goals in the profession itself. In this chapter the historical development of social work will be traced with the primary focus on its value component up to the time Lindeman entered the profession.

      Social work, concerned with human relations and the solving of certain human problems, is almost as wide as life itself, and the development of its philosophy cannot be separated from the development of philosophical thought in all other human institutions in each country where it grew. This...

    • CHAPTER 6 1920 TO 1930: COMMUNITY PROCESSES AND THE INDIVIDUALʹS ROLE IN THEM
      (pp. 102-127)
      DOI: 10.5749/j.ctttt3n2.10

      Eduard Lindeman did not come to social work and social work education as a philosopher. Neither he nor his colleagues considered him such when he came to the New York School of Social Work. He was asked to teach at the young school because of his interest in community organization for welfare purposes and because of the contribution his bookThe Communityhad made to the thinking in this field. He was one of the first to establish principles of community organization and to actually observe and study the processes at work in communities.

      In the first speech he gave...

    • CHAPTER 7 1930 TO 1940: THE DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIAL GROUP WORK, SOCIAL RESEARCH, AND WELFARE PLANNING
      (pp. 128-139)
      DOI: 10.5749/j.ctttt3n2.11

      The reform movement had lost much of its impetus by 1930. Social work was trying to find its way from an idealistic general concern about human conditions to a combination of this concern with scientific inquiry and teachable methods. The methods of social group work and community organization began to develop. The settlement movement had relied on the conscience of the layman, but had not found a Mary Richmond to clearly define and develop its own teachable method. In the words of Frank Bruno: “When finally the technique of social group work was defined, neither the term nor its definition...

    • CHAPTER 8 1940 TO 1953: DEMOCRATIC PROPOSITIONS AND SOCIAL WORK METHODS
      (pp. 140-172)
      DOI: 10.5749/j.ctttt3n2.12

      As the years went on, the clarification and explication of the goals of social welfare work became increasingly important to Lindeman. This was apparent in his classroom, where more and more he taught philosophy and its application to the current political scene rather than specific methods of social work.

      The events in Nazi Germany and the outbreak of the war showed all too clearly that democracy was not something that could be taken for granted; rather the core of democracy was to be found in theparticipationof citizens in community and government decisions.

      Lindeman was convinced that democracies were...

  7. PART THREE A THEORY OF SOCIAL WORK
    • CHAPTER 9 INTEGRATION OF VALUE, METHOD, AND KNOWLEDGE
      (pp. 175-202)
      DOI: 10.5749/j.ctttt3n2.13

      The wordtheoryrather than the wordphilosophyis used by design in the title of this section. It is impossible for one person to establish such a theory, but the following is a modest endeavor to combine the value component of social work with its present view of the individual and the social scene and the way the profession deals with this combination. This is theory.

      Eduard Lindeman brought before social work the thinking of the humanities. In his democratic disciplines he tried to translate some of the more general philosophical demands into practical application. He was not completely...

  8. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 205-215)
    DOI: 10.5749/j.ctttt3n2.14
  9. INDEX
    (pp. 216-220)
    DOI: 10.5749/j.ctttt3n2.15