Skip to Main Content
Have library access? Log in through your library
Propaganda and Promotional Activities

Propaganda and Promotional Activities: An Annotated Bibliography

HAROLD D. LASSWELL
RALPH D. CASEY
BRUCE LANNES SMITH
Copyright Date: 1935
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 468
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttt5xg
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Propaganda and Promotional Activities
    Book Description:

    Propaganda and Promotional Activities: An Annotated Bibliography was first published in 1935. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. Every aspect of the subject of propaganda, or the “manipulation of collective responses,” is covered in the forty-five hundred titles listed in this exceptionally useful reference book. Included in the bibliography are books, pamphlets, and articles, many in foreign languages, dealing with the following topics: 1. The aims and methods of propaganda in the fields of politics and government, international relations, business and the professions, public and private finance, labor and agriculture, religion and morals, education, and social reform. 2. The media used in the dissemination of propaganda: the newspaper, the periodical, and the graphic arts; the radio; the press agent, the public relations counselor, and the advertising agency; the stage and screen; the lecture platform, the salon, and the tavern; the public fair, exposition, and museum. 3. The effectiveness of the various propagandist methods. 4. The function and regulation of propaganda in modern society. The volume opens with an essay by Professor Laswell on “The Study and Practice of Propaganda.” Complete subject and author indexes are also included.

    eISBN: 978-1-4529-3801-1
    Subjects: Sociology

Table of Contents

Export Selected Citations Export to NoodleTools Export to RefWorks Export to EasyBib Export a RIS file (For EndNote, ProCite, Reference Manager, Zotero, Mendeley...) Export a Text file (For BibTex)
  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-xii)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. xiii-xviii)
  3. THE STUDY AND PRACTICE OF PROPAGANDA
    (pp. 1-28)
    HAROLD D. LASSWELL

    Not bombs nor bread, but words, pictures, songs, parades, and many similar devices are the typical means of making propaganda. Not the purpose but the method distinguishes propaganda from the management of men by violence, boycott, bribery, and similar means of social control. Propaganda relies on symbols to attain its end: the manipulation of collective attitudes.

    In the sixteenth century, when the Roman Catholic church used the word to refer to its own missionary activity, propaganda was a descriptive and non-controversial term. But the expression fell on evil days during the World War of 1914–18, when inconvenient news and...

  4. PART I. PROPAGANDA STRATEGY AND TECHNIQUE
    (pp. 31-66)

    Theories of how to conduct successful propaganda have been formulated by public relations counsels, advertisers, political scientists, social psychologists, sociologists, social workers, journalists, and publicists. In this section titlesof the most general interestare included from the special fields. Less abstract or less important references are listed elsewhere....

  5. PART II. PROPAGANDA CLASSIFIED BY THE NAME OF THE PROMOTING GROUP
    (pp. 67-160)
  6. PART III. PROPAGANDA CLASSIFIED BY THE RESPONSE TO BE ELICITED
    (pp. 161-215)

    Studies that emphasize the objective sought by the propagandist are listed here....

  7. PART IV. THE SYMBOLS AND PRACTICES OF WHICH PROPAGANDA MAKES USE OR TO WHICH IT ADAPTS ITSELF
    (pp. 216-263)

    A propagandist is both helped and handicapped by the symbols and practices of the community. His skill consists in maneuvering successfully within the limits imposed by current vocabularies, prejudices, and practices. This section includes genetic studies of collective attitudes toward persons, groups, policies, doctrines, institutions, and practices.

    Histories that emphasize the collective symbols of the time. In some instances systematic comparisons are made between region and region, epoch and epoch, culture and culture; data are assembled from the work of students of contemporary civilizations, from the historians of civilization, and from social anthropologists....

  8. PART V. THE CHANNELS OF PROPAGANDA
    (pp. 264-343)

    No inclusive bibliography on the channels of propaganda has yet appeared. Some specialized bibliographies appear below, in Sections C and D....

  9. PART VI. THE MEASUREMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF PROPAGANDA
    (pp. 344-372)

    Professor L. L. Thurstone of the University of Chicago and his students have constructed scales, which may be obtained from the University of Chicago Press, concerning attitudes toward many subjects, including the following:...

  10. PART VII. PROPAGANDA AND CENSORSHIP IN MODERN SOCIETY
    (pp. 373-401)

    Selections from the vast literature that seeks to interpret the function of promotion in all its varied forms in contemporary civilization, together with titles that summarize social experience in striving to abolish or to regulate propaganda....

  11. PREVIOUS BIBLIOGRAPHIES ON PROPAGANDA
    (pp. 402-404)
  12. AUTHOR INDEX
    (pp. 407-434)
  13. SUBJECT INDEX
    (pp. 435-450)