Student Self-Support at the University of Minnesota

Student Self-Support at the University of Minnesota

JAMES G. UMSTATTD
Copyright Date: 1932
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 224
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttt740
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  • Book Info
    Student Self-Support at the University of Minnesota
    Book Description:

    Student Self-Support at the University of Minnesota was first published in 1932. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. This volume reports the results of an investigation conducted under the University Committee on Educational Research. Dr. Umstattd found that 55 per cent of the students enrolled in the University of Minnesota were earning a part or all of their college expenses. His book is a study of the means used by students to support themselves while in college, the employment services rendered by the university, types of students earning their way, amount of money earned, relationship between students and employers, and effect of self-support on scholastic standing, college activities, health, and various other factors.

    eISBN: 978-1-4529-3848-6
    Subjects: Education

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-xiv)
  3. CHAPTER I THE PROBLEM Recent Growth and Significance
    (pp. 1-42)

    Among the factors that have contributed to the increase in the problem of student self-support at the University of Minnesota is the increase in enrollment. Should the proportion of college students in need of self-support show no increase, an unlikely event in view of the tendency of secondary education to reach ever lower economic levels,¹ the problem of self-support would be affected by the sheer increase in registration. Since 1919-20 the enrollment of resident students at the University of Minnesota has increased from 8,229 to 13,454.² No tangible evidence is available to show the effect of such factors as lack...

  4. CHAPTER II COLLECTION AND TREATMENT OF THE DATA
    (pp. 43-66)

    The data for this study were drawn from four sources: (1) Questionnaire¹ returns from 5,676 regular students in attendance in May, 1929, including both self-supporting and non-self-supporting; (2) University of Minnesota College Ability Test ratings for 2,125 students selected as representative of the 5,676 questionnaire respondents; (3) the complete scholastic records of 1,419 students selected as a representative sampling of the 5,676; and (4) the records of student employes of the University of Minnesota on file in the office of the comptroller.

    To eliminate ambiguity in the questionnaire and to guard against erroneous impressions that might tend to vitiate the...

  5. CHAPTER III RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EARNINGS AND ECONOMIC NEED
    (pp. 67-83)

    There are three general types of students who earn: first, those whose economic conditions compel them to earn; second, those whose parents require them to earn; and third, those who earn because of preference rather than actual need or parental requirement.

    In attempting to determine the degree to which students in the first type earn in proportion to need, the data will be studied as to extent of earning and each of eight other variables selected as possible indices of economic status of the student. The variables will be discussed in the following order: total wealth of family, income of...

  6. CHAPTER IV EXTENT AND NATURE OF SELF-SUPPORT
    (pp. 84-134)

    The preceding discussion has dealt with the extensiveness of student self-support in colleges and universities and with efforts to handle the problem it creates; it has described the methods used in gathering the data for this study and in testing them as a sample; and it has shown that earning bears a slight relationship to need as measured. Before passing to a treatment of the effects of student self-support activities, an attempt will be made in the present chapter to describe the extent and nature of these activities as they exist at the University of Minnesota.

    To gain a view...

  7. CHAPTER V THE EFFECTS OF STUDENT SELF-SUPPORT
    (pp. 135-156)

    This chapter will be limited to a discussion of the effects of student self-support upon scholarship, extracurricular activities, and health. Other aspects of effect will be considered in the next chapter under the general heading of student reaction to the problem of self-support.

    To determine the influence of earning activities upon scholarship, comparisons were made between the percentage of expenses earned and each of the following variables: honor-point ratio, credit hours completed per quarter, number of credits dropped per quarter, and number of quarters of anticipated delay of graduation.

    The data for the honor-point ratio is reported separately according to...

  8. CHAPTER VI ATTITUDES OF STUDENTS TOWARD SELF-SUPPORT
    (pp. 157-168)

    With a view of obtaining a consensus of opinion concerning various aspects of the problem of self-support, students were requested to answer nine specific questions.¹ From their responses differing attitudes were discovered with respect to the following phases of the problem: the advantages derived from earning one’s way through college; the disadvantages resulting from self-support, including activities partially or wholly sacrificed; privileges the University might grant self-supporting students; cooperation that such students receive from their employers. Each of these phases will be discussed in relationship to five groups of earners ranging from those who earned less than 25 per cent...

  9. CHAPTER VII SUMMARY AND IMPLICATIONS
    (pp. 169-176)

    The data reported in the first chapter of this study left the impression that the problem of student self-support in American colleges and universities had increased in magnitude along with increases in college enrollments. Whether the proportion of self-supporting students in the total enrollment has remained constant was not determined with certainty, although the data clearly implied that proportional increases in enrollment from lower economic levels might result in a greater proportion of students earning a part or all of their expenses. In any event it appears that approximately one-half of the college students earn to some extent and that...

  10. APPENDIX A
    (pp. 177-194)
  11. APPENDIX B OTHER PROBLEMS SUGGESTED BY THIS STUDY
    (pp. 195-200)
  12. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 201-205)