Studies in Higher Education

Studies in Higher Education: Biennial Report of the Committee on Educational Research, University of Minnesota, 1940-42

Committee on Educational Research
Copyright Date: 1943
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 136
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttt7qm
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  • Book Info
    Studies in Higher Education
    Book Description:

    Studies in Higher Education was first published in 1943. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. The Biennial Report of the Committee on Educational Research, 1940-42 During this period the Committee on Educational Research devoted its resources primarily to two university-wide studies: those concerned with faculty services, and with the curriculum. The teaching load investigation formed the basis for establishing a sensible teaching load and provided a comprehensive analysis of the manifold activities for which the faculty and administrative staff are responsible. The curriculum study will be of greatest value if followed by more intensive studies in particular departments or colleges, some of which are already under way._x000B_

    eISBN: 978-1-4529-3767-0
    Subjects: Education

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-i)
  2. University of Minnesota Committee on Educational Research
    (pp. ii-ii)
  3. Committee Research Staff, 1940–42
    (pp. iii-iv)
  4. FOREWORD
    (pp. v-vi)
    T. R. McConnell and Ruth E. Eckert

    The resources of the Committee on Educational Research during the period covered by this report were devoted primarily to two university-wide studies, those concerned with faculty services and with the curriculum. These investigations were truly cooperative. Though they were conducted directly under the auspices of the committee, itself representative of the major divisions of the university, the schedules used to secure the data were devised with the assistance of subcommittees composed mainly of teaching members of the staff.

    The uses to which the results of these studies have already been put fully justify the time the faculty and the research...

  5. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  6. THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY LOAD STUDY
    (pp. 1-31)
    Ruth E. Eckert

    The faculty load study was instituted as one means of determining the services rendered by staff members to groups on this campus and to other organizations largely because of their university connections. Although information concerning teaching loads had been regularly collected by the president’s office, no regular means existed for reporting the time spent by faculty members outside the classroom in such activities as counseling individual students and citizens of the state, guiding and directing research, working on college and university committees, preparing scholarly papers and books, attending professional meetings, and contributing expert advice or special skills to projects in...

  7. THE UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM SURVEY
    (pp. 32-64)
    T. R. McConnell and Ruth E. Eckert

    The major purpose of the present study, which was undertaken in 1941–42 at the request of the board of regents and the president of the University of Minnesota, was to find out how the university resources represented by course offerings might be utilized most effectively throughout this period of national emergency. To all concerned, one of the surest ways of safeguarding fundamental elements in the university program appeared to lie in a thorough analysis of current practices. Whatever readjustments in courses might later become necessary would be less likely to impair the effectiveness of the whole program if all...

  8. RESIDENCE AND MIGRATION OF MINNESOTA COLLEGE STUDENTS
    (pp. 65-70)
    Ruth E. Eckert

    Data for the present report have been obtained from a comprehensive study of the residence and migration of students enrolled in American colleges in 1938–39. The purpose of this migration study, like that of earlier studies made of the same problem,† was to determine the number of college students residing in each state of the Union, the proportion of college students to the general population of the states from which they come, and the percentage of students who leave their home states to secure a college education. Findings concerning the residence and migration of Minnesota college students, with which...

  9. THE DISTRIBUTION OF FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AMONG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
    (pp. 71-73)
    E. G. Williamson and John D. Foley

    The University of Minnesota provides many types of financial assistance for its students. These include loans, scholarships, prizes, tuition exemption (for graduate students, blind students, and other groups), and part-time employment within the university. In view of the anticipated increase in the financial needs of students, it has seemed desirable to analyze all available resources to determine to what extent they are distributed equitably among the students in the several colleges of the university.

    This progress report sets forth the results of such an analysis of the distribution of the above-mentioned types of aid during the academic year 1940–41....

  10. STUDENT SELECTION AND STUDENT SURVIVAL IN THE COLLEGE OF SCIENCE, LITERATURE, AND THE ARTS
    (pp. 74-76)
    Kenneth E. Clark

    The purpose of this study was to discover the degree of success attained in this university by the freshmen who entered the College of Science, Literature, and the Arts in September 1936 and the extent to which their achievement was related to entrance test scores and to first-year scholarship. Such information is essential for dealing with problems concerning admission, prediction of scholastic attainment and length of residence in the university, and differentiation of the educational programs of students who will terminate their college work at the end of two years and of those who will enter the senior college or...

  11. PREDICTING SCHOLASTIC ACHIEVEMENT IN THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
    (pp. 77-80)
    John G. Darley and R. F. Berdie

    In 1940 the School of Business Administration requested that a study be made of the scholastic success of students entering that college, most of whom are drawn from other colleges of the university and from other institutions and must be assisted by members of the faculty in selecting appropriate major curriculums. Hence during the years 1940–42 the relationships among various predictive measures and grades in the School of Business Administration were studied.

    In the fall of 1940, 234 male students entering the School of Business Administration were given a special battery of tests. Another group of 140 entering students...

  12. AN ANALYSIS OF THE FACTORS MAKING FOR SUCCESS OR FAILURE IN FRESHMAN WRITING
    (pp. 81-84)
    Margaret E. Day

    In an attempt to aid high school English teachers in evaluating and improving instruction in composition, a study was made of the strong and weak elements in the writing of freshmen just entering the university. As part of a larger investigation of the courses in freshman English made by the Committee on Educational Research and the College of Science, Literature, and the Arts, two hundred impromptu themes written by freshmen during their first week of school were studied intensively by members of the freshman English staff. These themes were carefully selected to represent the work of students in the freshman...

  13. THE ENGLISH PLACEMENT STUDY
    (pp. 85-89)
    John G. Darley, N. A. Fattu, James T. Hillhouse and E. G. Williamson

    All freshmen entering the University of Minnesota are required to take a year of English unless they demonstrate, by examination, that they have already attained a high level of competence. This means that great differences in background and achievement complicate the problem of teaching nearly 3000 entering students. Since more effective instruction and learning usually occur in relatively homogeneous groups, the problem of classifying students initially into appropriate sections becomes an important one. The Department of English therefore provides five categories for classifying entering students: Exempt, A–B–C (for superior students), 4–5–6 (for typical students), Postponed, and Preparatory.

    The...

  14. THE RELATION OF STUDY SKILLS IN THE SOCIAL STUDIES TO OTHER MEASURED ABILITIES
    (pp. 90-93)
    Horace T. Morse, George H. McCune and Frances O. Triggs

    In recent years increasing attention has been given to the mastery of study skills along with the usual informational content in social studies courses. Skills are given a prominent position in current lists of objectives, and the National Council for the Social Studies, the official organization of teachers in this field, has devoted its entire thirteenth yearbook (1942) to the topic of critical thinking. A concomitant interest has centered around testing for the mastery of the processes of acquisition and evaluation of social learning. Very little research has yet become available, however, concerning the relation of these study skills to...

  15. PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION FOR SOCIAL WORK
    (pp. 94-104)
    Anne F. Fenlason and Raymond F. Sletto

    The shortage of professionally qualified social workers today presents an acute problem to schools of social work. The purposes of this report are to examine the background factors responsible for this shortage and to evaluate the present program for training social workers from the point of view of (1) its potentialities for meeting this shortage and (2) its adequacy in terms of the findings revealed in our study of the expressed needs of Minnesota social workers for further training.*

    The shortage of social workers was first created during the depression period by the great expansion of public welfare services, without...

  16. THE CONSTRUCTION AND EVALUATION OF COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS IN THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
    (pp. 105-113)
    Palmer O. Johnson

    The construction of comprehensive examinations involves on the one hand all the difficulties common to the construction of course examinations and on the other certain difficulties peculiar to examinations covering a broader, less clearly defined area. Among the latter is the special difficulty of amassing the materials of instruction from wide areas and of preparing them for testing in such a way that the examinations can be said to be comprehensive in fact as well as in title. In the preparation of all examinations the purpose should be kept clearly in mind, but unfortunately this is often left undefined. The...

  17. ANALYSIS OF THE GENERAL COLLEGE SOCIAL-CIVIC AREA
    (pp. 114-120)
    Horace T. Morse

    In 1940 a General College committee was appointed to consider the adequacy of the social-civic area as then constituted. The investigation was to determine whether or not the so-called “problems” organization embodied in several General College courses had any merit over the more traditional subject-matter organization used in certain other courses offered in the college. Courses in the first category were organized around certain major social problems and drew from all the social sciences without regard to subject-matter boundaries as the need arose in considering the data relevant to various aspects of modern society.* The courses herein classified in the...

  18. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS OF STUDENTS RECEIVING THE B.A. DEGREE
    (pp. 121-126)
    T. R. McConnell and Ruth E. Eckert

    The need of affording students a sound general education has been strikingly revealed by recent studies of youth and young adults. Many young people have completed a secondary school program and even a four-year college course and yet have emerged unacquainted with many areas of human endeavor and unprepared for important responsibilities. Graduate school advisers and those teaching in professional schools, as well as competent observers outside the schools, have repeatedly indicated that a thorough grounding in the humanities, social studies, and natural sciences may contribute more to professional success than do a great many specialized courses at the undergraduate...