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Playwrights for Tomorrow

Playwrights for Tomorrow: A Collection of Plays, Volume 9

EDITED, WITH AN INTRODUCTION, BY ARTHUR H. BALLET
Copyright Date: 1972
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 216
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.cttttczd
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  • Book Info
    Playwrights for Tomorrow
    Book Description:

    This is the ninth volume in the continuing series Playwrights for Tomorrow, which makes available collections of plays by dramatists who have participated in the program of the Office for Advanced Drama Research at the University of Minnesota. Arthur H. Ballet, the series editor, is the director of the program. Professor Ballet writes an introduction to the volume, sketching a history of the O.A.D.R. program, telling about some of its accomplishments and programs, and giving information about the playwrights and productions of the plays included here. He explains: “The O.A.D.R. was established in 1963 at the University of Minnesota, with financial aid from the Rockefeller Foundation, to provide an opportunity for playwrights seeking to try fresh paths, an opportunity to have their work performed without the pressures endemic to the commercial theatre.” The plays in this volume are Encore by David Korr, Madam Popov by Gladden Schrock, Children of the Kingdom by The Company Theatre Ensemble with script by Don Keith Opper, and Psalms of Two Davids by Joel Schwartz. Encore and Madam Popov were presented, in separate productions, at the Other Place Theatre of the Tyrone Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis. Children of the Kingdom was presented by The Company Theatre in Los Angeles. Psalms of Two Davids was produced at the College of Marin in California under the direction of James Dunn. Two of the plays - Children of the Kingdom and Psalms of Two Davids - are full-length and the other two are one-act plays.

    eISBN: 978-0-8166-6140-4
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-2)
  3. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 3-6)
    Arthur H. Ballet

    As Sabina in Thornton Wilder’sSkin of Our Teethsays: “Oh — why can’t we have plays like we used to have —Peg o’ My Heart,andSmilin’ Thru,andThe Bat . .” Well, Sabina, we still do have plays like that. Playwrights write them and theatres do them. Despite protests to the contrary, I rather suspect that writers, audiences, and theatres really do want “plays like we used to have . . good entertainment with a message you can take home with you!”

    The Office for Advanced Drama Research (O.A.D.R.) has tried to find new voices and daring theatres...

  4. Encore A SHORT PLAY FOR THREE VOICES AND GUITAR
    (pp. 7-16)
    DAVID KORR

    The curtains remain closed; from behind them steps a man with a broom. His name is Seth and he is middle-aged and ill-tempered. He begins to sweep halfheartedly, then notices the audience.

    SETH

    Oh Jesus, not again. (He looks around the audience without a grain of curiosity, and clucks to himself.) Hey, Benny!

    BENNY

    (from backstage) What’s that?

    SETH

    C’mere.

    BENNY

    (looking out from behind the curtains) Hello?

    SETH

    They’re back.

    BENNY

    Well, I’ll be damned. Persistent bunch, aren’t they. (He comes out.)

    SETH

    Somebody must have sold tickets for every night the theatre’s closed. Made himself a little pocket...

  5. Madam Popov A PLAY IN ONE ACT
    (pp. 17-50)
    GLADDEN SCHROCK

    A castle. A few deranged lights illuminate a dusty throne flanked by a weird assortment of chairs, stuffed animals, a trunk of threadworn but once fashionable clothes, a plow beam and various other instruments of labor. Stage right is relatively bare except for an old refectory table, above which dangles a knife. The knife is weighted at the hilt with a cast-iron ball and is held up by a rope which, by a series of pulleys and clews, attaches to a triplock at the neckrest of the throne. On the wall at stage left are simulated french windows. Through them...

  6. Children of the Kingdom
    (pp. 51-116)
    THE COMPANY THEATRE ENSEMBLE and DON KEITH OPPER

    As the audience enters Flash, Tommie, and Jack are onstage or throughout the house. Jack and Tommie are balancing equipment while Flash is fooling with the lights. There should be many light changes as the audience enters; some houselights are on, some off. Entrances in this scene are made from every available door.

    JACK

    (singing) Hey, baby, I’m callin’ from the jail

    TOMMIE

    What is that?

    JACK

    A song.

    TOMMIE

    Song, (putters around)

    JACK

    New one . . I think we’ll do it while we’re here.

    FLASH

    (to Jack) Move around a bit. (under some kind of lighting) The other...

  7. Psalms of Two Davids A PLAY IN TWO PARTS
    (pp. 117-208)
    JOEL SCHWARTZ

    SEER

    There is no doubt among us:

    the earth beneath us will

    when least expected

    quake.

    Each day the prophets

    with their matted hair

    grow numerous and frenzied

    in the crowded streets,

    and a comet

    in the form of a scuttlecrab

    is sighted nightly

    in the sign of the Scorpion.

    It is said to refer to the king

    Saul.

    There are queues forming

    at the mouths of caves

    where witches

    hold their counsel with the dead,

    and the prophet Samuel

    rends his’clothes

    rolls his eyes

    foams like a rabid dog

    and curses

    that he was made to inaugurate

    over Israel...