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Studies in English Philology

Studies in English Philology: A Miscellany in Honor of Frederick Klaeber

KEMP MALONE
MARTIN B. RUUD
Copyright Date: 1929
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 504
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.cttttf6c
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  • Book Info
    Studies in English Philology
    Book Description:

    "Profesor Klaeber’s admirers have produced this miscellany to honour him ‘on his sixty-fifth birthday, which marks also the completion of thirty-five years of service in the University of Minnesota.’"

    eISBN: 978-1-4529-3615-4
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-viii)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. ix-x)
  3. FOUR FOOTNOTES To Papers on Germanic Metrics
    (pp. 1-13)
    William Ellery Leonard

    My notions on Germanic metrics have been set down in three monographs:Beowulf and the Nibelungen Couplet;theScansion of Middle English Alliterative Verse;andLa Métrica del Cid.¹ The first attempted to explain how a four-beat scansion of the Old Germanic half-line actually sounds in my ears, as metrically far more satisfying than the orthodox two stresses; and suggested objective reasons for the historic validity of that scansion, based upon Germanic linguistics and on the linguistic and metrical phenomena of later Germanic verse (from Otfried to modern nursery rhymes), as well as upon the intrinsic nature of all verse...

  4. OLD WEST GERMANIC AND OLD NORSE
    (pp. 14-20)
    Ernst A. Kock

    “The great advantages of treating the different West Germanic literatures as a unit, in other words, the merits of the comparative method, are brought home to us in a very direct and convincing manner. Also the Old Norse literature has been drawn upon with a view to throwing light on obscure spots of Old English poetry.”—“Die gesamte altgermanische Überlieferungsmasse bildet eine grosse, untrennbare Einheit.”

    Professor Fr. Klaeber, always ready to estimate in a generous way any serious attempt made by a fellow-searcher for truth, encouraged me, some years ago, by the words first quoted. Professor G. Neckel, in a...

  5. LOSS OF A NASAL BEFORE LABIAL CONSONANTS
    (pp. 21-27)
    Eilert Ekwall

    The problem to be dealt with in this paper has not been totally overlooked, but it has not been made the subject of special study. Loss of a nasal beforewis assumed by Mr. Baddeley (Place-Names of Gloucestershire) forStowell, which is derived by him fromstān-wiella, and by Professor Mawer, dealing withStawardNb.¹ The phenomenon is, however, quite common, and a collection of material with a few notes may not be found without interest. The material does not claim to be complete. Very likely more examples will come to light as more material is made accessible. Some...

  6. MORPHOLOGICAL NOTES
    (pp. 28-31)
    Francis A. Wood

    That analogy may produce new grammatical forms is a fact so well established that no examples need be given to illustrate it. But that “grammatical change” in Germanic was felt to be so important an element in tense-differentiation that it was employed in this way by analogy, has not, so far as I know, been pointed out. The one dialect that is an exception to this is Gothic, and here “grammatical change” in the verb system was regularly lost.

    To illustrate the analogical use of “grammatical change“ we will take the verbgedeihen, with the various forms as they occur...

  7. CONCERNING THE ORIGIN OF THE GERUND IN ENGLISH
    (pp. 32-49)
    Morgan Callaway Jr.

    The recent appearance of an able monograph,On the Origin of the Gerund in English,¹ by Dr. George Ch. van Langenhove, of the University of Ghent, opens afresh a much-disputed question, and will perhaps justify a brief reconsideration of the theories hitherto offered as to the origin of the English gerund, that is, the verbal noun in -ung(-ing) having an accusative object.

    Dr. van Langenhove’s monograph bears the subtitlePhonology, and is restricted almost exclusively to a consideration of the phonological problem involved in the origin of the English gerund. The subtitle leads one to hope that in a...

  8. SEMANTIC BORROWING IN OLD ENGLISH
    (pp. 50-72)
    Samuel Kroesch

    In a discussion of the application of analogy to development of meaning¹ the present writer called attention to a type of analogy of synonyms. He pointed out that words in one dialect often develop new meanings because they become associated with synonymous words that have already developed semantically in a different direction and so take over these new meanings analogically. Another form of semantic analogy psychologically identical with this is that in which the synonym belongs to a different dialect or to a foreign language. This type we may call “semantic borrowing.” In the latter case the native word becomes...

  9. RECURRING FIRST ELEMENTS IN DIFFERENT NOMINAL COMPOUNDS IN BEOWULF AND IN THE ELDER EDDA
    (pp. 73-78)
    Francis P. Magoun Jr.

    A modern reader ofBeowulfis almost inevitably struck by what seems like an excessive use of certain words as the first element of different nominal compounds;¹ for example,gúpfigures as the first element of thirty different compounds, of which not a few give the impression of having been created mainly for the sake of the alliteration, e.g.,gúp-beorn, -bil, -byrne, -freca, -helm, -rinc, -sceapa, -searo, -sweord, and -wiga. Now the question is: Was compounding of this sort regarded as excessive, cumbersome, and otiose by critical contemporary hearers and readers; was it regarded as good and legitimate art; or...

  10. NOTES ON THE PREVERB ge- IN ALFREDIAN ENGLISH
    (pp. 79-102)
    Leonard Bloomfield

    The verb prefixge- in Alfredian English is discussed in a doctoral dissertation by P. Lenz,Der syntactische Gebrauch der Partikel"ge"in den Werken Alfreds des Grossen(Darmstadt, 1886). Lenz deals with only a small part of the material, has some wrong notions (ge- due to precedingmag, to presence in clause of purpose, etc.), and, of course, has not yet the concept of aspect; but, on the whole, his work is sound. A later dissertation, by H. Hesse,Perfektive und imperfektive Aktionsart im Altenglischen(Münster, 1906), gives extensive materialm from the OE Bede, but otherwise contributes nothing, since...

  11. TERMS AND PHRASES FOR THE SEA IN OLD ENGLISH POETRY
    (pp. 103-119)
    Helen Thérèse McMillan Buckhurst

    The very nature of Old English, as of Old Norse verse demanded a wealth of synonyms for any subject that was at all likely to appear with any frequency; and it is safe to say that there is hardly a single poem dating from the OE period in which the sea does not play some part or at least receive some mention. Hence it is not surprising that of all the subjects for which the OE poet multiplied terms and phrases, it is the sea that is expressed with the greatest variety. In a recent article,¹ Professor H. C. Wyld...

  12. EPITHETIC COMPOUND FOLK-NAMES IN BEOWULF
    (pp. 120-134)
    William Frank Bryan

    The purpose of this study is to examine the epithetic compound folk-names inBeowulf—not as a body but each in its own setting—in the effort to determine to what extent these names were formed or selected by the poet because of their appropriateness to their particular context, and to what extent they were used as purely general, stylistic devices or as forced by the exigencies of poetic form, especially by the demands of alliteration. An examination of this kind should have some value as a test or reflection of the poet’s artistry.

    Though no such examination of the...

  13. THE DAUGHTER OF HEALFDENE
    (pp. 135-158)
    Kemp Malone

    The English epic poemBeowulfopens with a short sketch of the history of the Scylding dynasty of Danish kings. As one would expect, the poet traces the dynasty back into a period about which his information is legendary rather than historical, and he represents as its founder a king, Scyld by name, who must be regarded as mythical. In the unique MS of the poem, this legendary lore is set off from the historical part of the sketch: the first fit of the poem begins, not with verse I, but with verse 53; in other words, the division into...

  14. HENGEST AND HIS NAMESAKE
    (pp. 159-171)
    Anton Gerard Van Hamel

    Are Hengest, leader in the Saxon Conquest, and Hengest, thane of Hnæf the Dane in the fierce struggle at Finnsburuh, one and the same person?

    Criticism has been concerned a good deal about this problem. Since Grein¹ the identity of the two has been generally rejected, but of later years there is a tendency to return to the original view that there never was more than one Hengest, especially since it was adopted by Chadwick.² Recently the problem received a most noteworthy treatment from Dr. Imelmann,³ who adduces no less than thirteen arguments in favor of a solution in the...

  15. BEOWULF AND THE SAGA OF SAMSON THE FAIR
    (pp. 172-181)
    William Witherle Lawrence

    One of the most interesting of the late Scandinavian reworkings of continental romantic material is theSaga of Samson the Fair. The influence of King Hákon Hákonarson of Norway, who reigned from 1217 to 1263, and the growing taste for foreign tales, led to the translation and paraphrasing of many romances that had first attained celebrity in Old French. Enthusiasm for the new literature spread to Denmark and Sweden, and to Iceland, which became the source of the greatest number of Scandinavian manuscripts of medieval romances. The material is extremely varied. With such sagas as those of Tristram, of Erec,...

  16. BEOWULF UND DIE MEROWINGER
    (pp. 182-188)
    Alois Brandl

    Der treue Wiglaf, das Haupt des gefallenen Gefolgsherrn Beowulf im Schosse, sendet an die geflohenen Gautenkameraden einen Boten, der ihnen Unheil voraussagt: Feindeshochmut und Volkesuntergang. Indem der Bote dabei an den Schlachtentod des früheren Gautenkünigs Hygelac bei einem Raubzug gegen die niederrheinischen Franken erinnert, ruft er aus, ‘immer seitdem’ sei ‘uns die Gunst der Merowinger (Hs.: eines Merowingers) versagt geblieben.’ Der Vers verdient sorgsame Überlegung; er heisst nach Klaebers vorzüglicher Ausgabe 2920 f.:

    Durch ihn gewinnen wir nicht bloss das deutlichste der bisher gefundenen Anzeichen für die Entstehungszeit des Epos; denn 752 starben die Merowinger aus; später wäre ihr Name...

  17. A NOTE ON THE PSYCHOLOGY OF THE BEOWULF POET
    (pp. 189-195)
    James R. Hulbert

    In an article entitled “The Haunted Mere inBeowulf,”¹ Professor Lawrence has examined in detail the description of the place where Beowulf fought Grendel’s mother. His analysis of the descriptive data brought him to the conclusion that the account is inconsistent.

    We have, then, in various places in the poem, indications of three separate conceptions of the location of the mere: first, in the moors and fens; second, in high and rocky land; and third, in or near the sea. The reader may form his own opinion, from the preceding discussion, as to whether the discrepancies which have been indicated...

  18. TWO TYPES OF SCRIBAL ERRORS IN THE BEOWULF MS
    (pp. 196-207)
    Eduard Prokosch

    Certain differences in the manner of work of the two scribes of theBeowulfare well known and have been frequently discussed, for example, by Ten Brink, Davidson, McClumpha, and especially by Foerster,Die Beowulf-Handschrift, and by Klaeber (Beowulf, pp. xci ff. and xcviii ff.) and Rypins (Three Old English Prose Texts, pp. xiv ff.; cf. also Klaeber, p. xvii). According to Ten Brink, scribe B is the more careful of the two, while Rypins holds the opposite view. In my opinion, the two views can be reconciled: The second scribe is more mechanically correct, both in the tracing of...

  19. NOTES ON BEOWULF
    (pp. 208-212)
    Samuel Moore

    This passage has been variously treated in the more recent editions ofBeowulf. Wyatt, Holder, and Schücking (8th ed.) retained the MS reading and gave forsyððanthe meaning ‘avenge,strafen, rächen.’ Holthausen (1st, 2d), following Sievers, assumed the loss of a line after 1106. Trautmann, Holthausen (3d, 4th, 5th), Sedgefield, and Klaeber print various emendations. Chambers printssyððanin his text and refers in his Glossary to the note on the passage reading: “Unless we are to understand some word like ‘decide’ —a rather violent proceeding—something must, as Sievers supposes, be missing here; or perhaps the necessary infinitive...

  20. NOCH EINMAL: “ENGE ĀNPAÐAS, UNCŪÐ GELĀD”
    (pp. 213-216)
    Levin L. Schücking

    Angesichts des grossen Trümmerfeldes, das die Methoden zur Feststellung der Chronologie der angelsächsichen Gedichte heute darstellen, wird man jede Möglichkeit, die Abhängigkeit eines Werkes von einem andern mit Sicherheit zu erweisen, besonders wichtig nehmen und prüfen müssen. Eine solche Abhängigkeit hatte ich im Gegensatz zur voraufgehenden Forschung nachweisen zu können geglaubt im Verhältnis desBeowulf zur Exodus. War nämlich die frühere Forschung von dem Gedanken beherrscht gewesen, der Vers “enge ānpaðas, uncūþgelād,” habe den Sinn “enge Einzelpfade, unbekannte Wege,” und passe imBeowulfin den Zusammenhang, während er in derExodusoffenbar gar keinen rechten Sinn gebe und dort also...

  21. EXPERIMENTS IN TRANSLATING BEOWULF
    (pp. 217-231)
    Henry Cecil Wyld

    The accompanying versions of several passages fromBeowulfwere made at different times during the last few years. The question of what form a modern English translation should take has been variously answered, though perhaps a final answer has not yet been given. The present writer holds strongly that a modern version of a work so essentially poetical in form and diction ought certainly to be in verse, and, further, that the meter should be one of those, and they are numerous and varied enough, familiar in modern English poetry. Attempts to reproduce the rhythm of the old meter and...

  22. CAEDMON’S DREAM SONG
    (pp. 232-239)
    Louise Pound

    The “Caedmon legend,” meaning by this Bede’s story of the gift of the craft of song, brought to the poet in his middle age by a nocturnal visitant in a dream,¹ has had recurrent interest for scholars. Bede says that the command of the dream figure and Caedmon’s ability to obey it and to compose verse were interpreted as a direct inspiration from Heaven by those who assembled at the monastery of the Abbess Hild to hear the story. Florence of Worcester (d. 1118), writing under the year 680, speaks of Cedmon (his spelling) as the celebrated monk who “received...

  23. THE VASA MORTIS PASSAGE IN THE OLD ENGLISH SALOMON AND SATURN
    (pp. 240-253)
    Robert J. Menner

    Since John Kemble¹ first printed the Old English poetic dialogues ofSalomon and Saturn, little has been done to elucidate their many mysteries. Vincenti’s introductory study,² which discussed the relations of the Old English poems to Oriental legend and to later medieval versions in other languages, was never followed by the promised edition and commentary. Though the lines are consecutively numbered in Grein-Wülker,³ it is well recognized that the verses found in Corpus Christi College 422 really form two poems, the first ending with the plain statement that the Son of David had conquered and overcome “Caldea eorl,” i.e., Saturn...

  24. A PUTATIVE CHARTER TO ALDHELM
    (pp. 254-257)
    Albert Stanburrough Cook

    The historian Stubbs, writing in the third volume (1871) of theCouncils and Ecclesiastical Documentsedited by A. W. Haddan and himself, says (p. 124) of the document found in William of Malmesbury’sGesta Pontificum(ed. Hamilton), pages 347–349, and purporting to be a charter-grant of Bishop Leutherius (670–676) to Aldhelm and his successors at Malmesbury, with date of August 26, 675, that it is fictitious,² the first genuine grant to the monastery being by Ini of Wessex, A.D. 701. And elsewhere (Dict.Chr.Biog., III, 237) Stubbs says (1882) of the Malmesbury charters in general that very...

  25. DIE ALTENGLISCHEN VERZEICHNISSE VON GLÜCKS- UND UNGLÜCKSTAGEN
    (pp. 258-277)
    Max Förster

    Die Kleinliteratur des altenglischen Volksglaubens verdient einen Platz in der menschlichen Kulturgeschichte wegen ihrer ausserordentlichen Reichhaltigkeit und Vielseitigkeit sowie wegen des hohen Alters ihrer Überlieferung.

    Besonderer Beliebtheit hat sich unter den Angelsachsen die mittelalterlich-antike Tagwāhlerei erfreut. Man versteht darunter den aus heidnischen und christlichen, aus astrologischen und wahrsagerischen Elementen erwachsenen¹ Glauben, dass gewisse Tage der Woche, der Monate oder Jahre für gewisse Verrichtungen, wie Reisen, Kaufen, Pflanzen, Ernten, Aderlassen u. dgl. m. entweder glückverheissend oder aber unheilvoll und darum zu vermeiden seien.

    Die glückbedeutenden Tage treten in der altenglischen Überlieferung stark in den Hintergrund. Ich vermag nureinsolches Verzeichnis...

  26. ANGLO-NORMAN SCRIPT AND THE SCRIPT OF TWELFTH-CENTURY MSS IN NORTHWESTERN NORWAY
    (pp. 278-287)
    George T. Flom

    In an article published some years ago I traced somewhat in detail the development of the Insular and the Carolingian script in England in the eleventh and twelfth centuries; and I made a similar analysis of the earliest East Norwegian fragments with a view to determining the form of script borrowed and the date of borrowing.¹ I shall summarize some of the conclusions. The general aspect of the Norwegian script as well as many special characteristics point to the first quarter of the twelfth century as the time when the so-called Anglo-Saxon script was introduced into Eastern Norway; and Northern...

  27. THE EARLY ENGLISH LOAN-WORDS IN WELSH AND THE CHRONOLOGY OF THE ENGLISH SOUND-SHIFT
    (pp. 288-308)
    Robert Eugen Zachrisson

    It was maintained by the majority of early writers on historical English phonology that the English sound-shift did not take place until the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and that even then the so-called “continental pronunciation” of the English vowels was to a great extent kept. By some investigators of fifteenth-century texts, such as Dibelius¹ and Neumann,² it was pointed out that to judge by isolated spellings withefor ME ă inmanandname,ifor ME Ĕ inbe,oufor ME ō indo, andeiandaufor ME Ĕ, Ŕ, inlikeandhouse, some...

  28. KING ARTHUR, THE CHRIST, AND SOME OTHERS
    (pp. 309-319)
    Clark S. Northup

    The problem of the origins of King Arthur’s vari-colored and complex personality has never yet been quite satisfactorily solved. As is well known, his fame in the time when he is supposed to have lived would seem to have been slight. Gildas and Bede, as has often been pointed out, knew him not. By 679 or thereabouts he was known to a predecessor of Nennius¹ as adux bellorum, asArthur belliger, victor in twelve, a perfect number, of shadowy battles with the Saxons. Let us suppose that he was a brave general and that he conquered in a third...

  29. “HE KNEW NAT CATOUN FOR HIS WIT WAS RUDE”
    (pp. 320-339)
    Aage Brusendorff

    The Miller’s contemptuous reference to the Carpenter (in theCanterbury Tales, A 3227) may sound rather too personal for the reader of today. It may, therefore, please him to know that sometime about the third century A.D., a citizen of the Roman Empire wrote a collection of homely sayings in Latin distichs, giving pithy expression to a great many shrewd truths, as well as evidence of a rather skeptical and pessimistic outlook on life. This work is in the most important MSS headedLiber Catonisor evenDicta M. Catonis, though it can only be connected with any bearer of...

  30. [Illustration]
    (pp. None)
  31. LE RIRE DU PROPHÈTE
    (pp. 340-361)
    Alexander Haggerty Krappe

    Dans le poème latin généralement connu sous le nom deVita Merliniet qui date du milieu du XIIesiècle on raconte, entre beaucoup d’autres choses souvent fort bizarres mais pour le moment d’une importance secondaire, l’èpisode que voici:

    Merlin, roi des Gallois du Sud (Demetae), a perdu la raison à la suite de la mort de trois de ses amis intimes ou, si l’on préfère une autre interprétation du texte,¹ de ses propres frères. Dans sa démence il se retire dans la forêt où il mène la vie d’un sauvage. On finit par le forcer à se rendre à...

  32. SOMER SONEDAY
    (pp. 362-374)
    Carleton Brown

    The verses that form the subject of the present paper are preserved in MS Laud Misc. 108, from which they were printed more than eighty years ago by Sir Frederick Madden.¹ At the end of the text Sir Frederick placed a row of asterisks with the remark, “The poem ends imperfectly,” but in this opinion he appears to have been mistaken. Folio 237, on which this poem is written, is the last leaf of the Laud MS, leaving out of consideration the fly-leaf added for the protection of the volume. The MS shows no evidence of the loss of any...

  33. EINE ENGLISCHE URKUNDE AUS DEM JAHRE 1470
    (pp. 375-379)
    Lorenz Morsbach

    Die hier zum erstenmale veröffentlichte Urkunde aus meinem Besitz stammt zwar aus etwas späterer Zeit als die von mir im Jahre 1923 herausgegebenenMittelenglischen Originalurkunden, hat aber ausser ihrem sprach- und kulturgeschichtlichen Wert noch eine besondere Bedeutung, weil sie im Verein mit den in meiner Sammlung befindlichen Urkunden 15. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 26 ein interessantes Stück einer Familiengeschichte, nämlich derer von Meverell, von 1445 an bis 1470 bietet. Daraus ergibt sich, als äusserer Rahmen, dass Jankin Meverell 1445 schon verstorben war und sein Sohn Sir Sampson Meverell,knightdas Erbe des Vaters angetreten hatte (Urk. 15). Von...

  34. SHAKESPEARE AND FORMAL LOGIC
    (pp. 380-396)
    Hardin Craig

    In the middle of the twelfth century arose thelogica novamade up of Aristotle’sCategoriesandInterpretationand the famousIsagoge (logica vetus), together with theAnalytics, theTopics, andSophismsof Aristotle, and Gilbert’sLiber Sex Principiorum. Thelogica novawas succeeded by thelogica modernaof Petrus Hispanus, and the complete works of Aristotle in Greek came in the thirteenth century. St. Thomas Aquinas, Albertus Magnus, and Duns Scotus all wrote commentaries on Aristotle as well as independent logical treatises, and writings on Aristotelian logic in the period of scholasticism were numerous and extensive. There is the...

  35. A SPECIMEN OF VULGAR ENGLISH OF THE MID-SIXTEENTH CENTURY
    (pp. 397-400)
    Harry Morgan Ayres

    The debate, in verse, betwixt Thomas Churchyard and Thomas Camell (or Camel), dating from 1552 and preserved among the broadsides in the Library of the Society of Antiquaries, Burlington House, London, possesses a linguistic interest that seems to have escaped attention.¹ After the briefest comment I shall offer a specimen of it.

    An effort to convict each other of stupidity, the interchange between the two is so speedily successful on both sides that, in order to give it fresh interest and variety, several subsidiary characters from humble life who contribute to the discussion in dialect are introduced. First, goodman Gefferay...

  36. [Illustration]
    (pp. None)
  37. “WOO’T DRINK UP EISEL”?
    (pp. 401-402)
    Henning Larsen

    To the many comments on the “eisel” ofHamlet, it may seem almost useless to add still another unless that be final. The present note in no way hopes to attain any finality; it merely adds one more passage illustrating the use of “eisel” = Lat.acetillum(a reading and interpretation last presented, I believe, by Mr. F. L. Lucas in theTimes Lit. Supplement, July 29, 1926), interesting because of a new identification of its use in medicine and because of its appearance for the first time in Scandinavian in a MS of the fifteenth century.

    The passage is...

  38. THE ETYMOLOGY OF “YANKEE”
    (pp. 403-413)
    Henri Logeman

    TheN(ew)E(nglish)D(ictionary), after briefly reviewing various suggestions concerning the origin of this word, to which there will be occasion to come back later, remarks: “Perhaps the most plausible conjecture is that it comes from Dutchfanke, diminutive offan, = ‘John,’ applied as a derisive nickname by either Dutch or English in the New England state,” a suggestion due to Thierry in hisLife of Ticknor.

    Although we shall find that there is good reason to believe in a Dutch origin, and one containing the proper namefan, too, the suggestion as a whole will at once be...

  39. HARRINGTON AND LEIBNITZ
    (pp. 414-426)
    S. B. Liljegren

    A very great interest attaches to Harrington’sOceanain the history of political ideas. This is, however, chiefly the case as regards England, the United States of America, and France.¹ In Germany I have so far found only a single instance of anything like influence exercised by Harrington; a very curious instance, it is true, because it was no less a person than the philosopher Leibnitz himself who discovered the excellence of theOceanain this country.

    The fact has, so far as I have been able to ascertain, escaped the attention of scholars, probably owing to the eclipse that...

  40. THE BAROQUE STYLE IN PROSE
    (pp. 427-456)
    Morris W. Croll

    In the latter years of the sixteenth century a change declared itself in the purposes and forms of the arts of Western Europe for which it is hard to find a satisfactory name. One would like to describe it, because of some interesting parallels with a later movement, as the first modern manifestation of the Romantic Spirit; and it did, in fact, arise out of a revolt against the classicism of the high Renaissance. But the terms “romantic” and “classical” are both perplexing and unphilosophical; and their use should not be extended. It would be much clearer and more exact...

  41. ALEXANDER HAMILTON AND THE BEGINNINGS OF COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY
    (pp. 457-466)
    R. W. Chambers and F. Norman

    Alexander Hamilton, F.R.S. (1762 —1824), who must on no account be confused with his great American contemporary and namesake, had some reputation among his English fellow-countrymen as a pioneer in the study of Oriental languages, and in this capacity he has a modest half-column allotted to him in theDictionary of National Biography. As far as we are aware, he has received no credit as one of the early students, who, before the time of Rask, Bopp, and Grimm, recognized the linguistic connections of some Indo-European languages.

    These forerunners were, of course, a numerous band.¹ An early pioneer was Filippo...

  42. PROGRESS IN THE TEACHING OF EARLY ENGLISH
    (pp. 467-476)
    Arthur G. Kennedy

    The gradually changing conditions and purposes of higher education in the United States have influenced to such a degree the study and teaching of Anglo-Saxon and Middle English as to seem to justify an attempt at an appraisal of progress made during the past generation or two in the teaching of Early English, and perhaps, to some extent, to warrant suggestions for further changes in the plan and method of the teaching. With the publication in 1869 of hisComparative Grammar of the Anglo-Saxon Language, Professor Francis A. March emphasized so much the comparative study of Anglo-Saxon that our teaching...

  43. A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE WORKS OF FREDERICK KLAEBER
    (pp. 477-485)
    StefÁn Einarsson
  44. VITA
    (pp. 486-486)