Adult Abilities

Adult Abilities: A Study of University Extension Students

HERBERT SORENSON
Copyright Date: 1938
Edition: NED - New edition
DOI: 10.5749/j.cttttf7t
Pages: 204
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.cttttf7t
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Adult Abilities
    Book Description:

    Adult Abilities: A Study of University Extension Students was first published in 1950. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. Adults learn much better than is commonly believed; this is the conclusion reached by Dr. Herbert Sorenson in a nation-wide study of many thousands of adult students in university extension classes. Dr. Sorenson conducted a personal investigation in the state universities of Virginia, California, Kentucky, Colorado, Utah, Indiana, and Minnesota, as well as numerous other schools throughout the country that offer courses for adults. His findings, incorporated in this volume, contribute a substantial body of new data on a subject about which too little has been known heretofore._x000B_

    eISBN: 978-1-4529-3835-6
    Subjects: Education

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-xii)
    DOI: 10.5749/j.cttttf7t.1
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. xiii-2)
    DOI: 10.5749/j.cttttf7t.2
  3. CHAPTER ONE CHARACTERISTICS OF EXTENSION STUDENTS
    (pp. 3-31)
    DOI: 10.5749/j.cttttf7t.3

    The classroom activities sponsored by university extension divisions are an important phase of adult education in this country. During the late afternoon and evening thousands of American adults are taking university courses offered through that medium. In many schools the number of such adults is equal to a large percentage of the residence enrollment, and they receive university credit for their courses. But since few studies have been made of extension work, little is known about these students’ mental abilities or the quality of their actual classroom achievement. This study is an attempt to learn something about those matters.

    The...

  4. CHAPTER TWO THE MENTAL ABILITIES OF EXTENSION STUDENTS
    (pp. 32-71)
    DOI: 10.5749/j.cttttf7t.4

    Before we discuss the fitness of extension students for college work, it may be well to make clear our use of certain words. The term “mental abilities” is used here to mean the abilities measured by the tests given to the extension and residence students, that is, mental abilities as measured by aptitude tests. Such abilities are considered equivalent to academic or logical intelligence, which should be distinguished from social intelligence or motor capacity.

    And to clarify our distinction betweencapacityandability: Ability, psychologically speaking, means skill, knowledge, and performance. Capacity, on the other hand, is the power to...

  5. CHAPTER THREE THE CLASSROOM ACHIEVEMENT OF EXTENSION STUDENTS
    (pp. 72-101)
    DOI: 10.5749/j.cttttf7t.5

    Through the cooperation of directors of extension divisions, objective data have been collected on the classroom achievement of fifty pairs of comparable daytime and evening classes. For each pair the instructor, subject matter, and examinations were the same. In some instances the examinations were of the essay type, and in others of the objective type.

    Because it was not possible to obtain many comparable classes that met the necessary requirements, the comparisons are relatively limited in number; but we believe they comply with the principles of good sampling. TheLiterary Digestpresidential poll of1936showed that a large sample...

  6. CHAPTER FOUR TEACHING METHODS, PROBLEMS, AND PERSONNEL
    (pp. 102-136)
    DOI: 10.5749/j.cttttf7t.6

    The achievement of extension students depends to a certain extent upon the quality of the instruction they receive, which in turn is contingent upon the methods used, the caliber of the instructors, and the equipment and facilities available for both instructors and students. Some of the matters discussed here are based on the opinions and experiences of extension teachers and directors; others rest on more or less objective data.

    An important problem of extension education concerns the teaching methods used in extension classes as compared with those employed in residence classes. By interviewing and observing many extension instructors at various...

  7. CHAPTER FIVE THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AGE AND MENTAL ABILITY
    (pp. 137-186)
    DOI: 10.5749/j.cttttf7t.7

    The relationship between mental ability and age is an interesting and important factor in adult education. Do abilities increase or decrease with age? Do they remain constant, or do some increase while others decline?

    This relationship as analyzed for the childhood years in the numerous studies of children’s abilities shows that from birth to adolescence there is a marked growth in most abilities, mental and physiological. Such studies are much more easily made for children than for adults. Since most children are in school, they have similar opportunities and, to a large extent, a comparable environment. Also, with the exception...

  8. INDEX
    (pp. 187-190)
    DOI: 10.5749/j.cttttf7t.8