A Parent’s Guide to Cleft Lip and Palate

A Parent’s Guide to Cleft Lip and Palate

Karlind T. Moller
Clark D. Starr
Sylvia A. Johnson
Copyright Date: 1990
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 144
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttthmk
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  • Book Info
    A Parent’s Guide to Cleft Lip and Palate
    Book Description:

    A Parent’s Guide to Cleft Lip and Palate was first published in 1990. This clear and comprehensive guide was written to help parents and health professionals better understand the nature, cause, and treatment of cleft lip and palate, which annually affects one out of 600 to 700 infants born in the United States and Canada. The authors emphasize the positive outlook for successful treatment of children with clefts and the vital role parents and caregivers play in this treatment. The authors begin by describing the different types of clefts, how they develop, and what causes them. Subsequent chapters are devoted to surgical treatment, feeding, hearing, speech development, dental problems, and psychosocial adjustment -- providing practical information on the types of help available, where it can be obtained, and the results that can be expected. Liberally augmented with case histories relating the treatment experiences of children and their families, the text is illustrated with diagrams and photographs and includes a glossary plus appendixes ranging in content from a list of professional associations and parent support groups to a comprehensive listing of suggested readings.

    eISBN: 978-0-8166-8239-3
    Subjects: Health Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. FOREWORD
    (pp. vii-x)
    R. J. G.

    AParent’s Guide to Cleft Palateis a volume in a series addressing the needs not only of parents but also of physicians and persons concerned with the care of children with relatively common disorders. We used as a modelThe Child with Down’s Syndrome,written by David W. Smith, M.D., and Ann Asper Wilson and first published in 1973 by W. B. Saunders, Philadelphia. The book is very valuable because it makes the complex concepts of genetics and pediatrics understandable to parents. Such is the goal of our series.

    In AParent’s Guide to Cleft Palate,it was the...

  4. PREFACE
    (pp. xi-4)
  5. Chapter 1 WHAT IS CLEFT LIP AND PALATE?
    (pp. 5-12)

    The wordcleftcommonly refers to a “split” or “separation,” and that is exactly what a cleft lip or palate is. People with this medical condition have a split in the upper lip (sometimes extending into the floor of the nose), in the upper bony gum ridge, or in the roof of the mouth (palate). In some cases, the split occurs in all these areas. What has happened is that sections of skin, muscle, and bone normally joined have been separated by a cleft. It is important to understand that nothing is missing in a person with a cleft; all...

  6. Chapter 2 A TEAM APPROACH TO A COMPLEX PROBLEM
    (pp. 13-18)

    Since clefts involve a part of the body as central to human activity as the mouth, it is not surprising that these defects can have wide-ranging effects when uncorrected. Of course, not every child with a cleft has the same set of problems. Each situation is unique, depending on the original nature of the cleft and the specific pattern of growth and development. There are, however, some general areas of concern for all children born with this defect. Following is an overview of these areas and of the ways in which the problems are usually handled. Later chapters will discuss...

  7. Chapter 3 CLOSING THE GAP: SURGICAL REPAIR OF CLEFTS
    (pp. 19-38)

    Surgery is one of the first medical treatments given to a child with cleft lip or palate. In this chapter, we will describe the nature of the surgery, its timing, and how it will affect your child’s speech, appearance, and physical well-being. First, however, we would like to introduce you to the surgeon.

    In most instances, your child’s surgery will be done by a specialist who is a plastic surgeon, a pediatric surgeon, or an otolaryngologist. These are all medical doctors who have spent an additional three to five years in training to become surgeons. Part of their training involved...

  8. Chapter 4 FEEDING A CHILD WITH A CLEFT
    (pp. 39-44)

    Feeding certainly is an early concern for the parents of a child with a cleft lip or palate. One of your first questions after the birth of your child may have been, “Will I have problems feeding the baby?”

    There is no simple answer to this question. Some children and parents experience no difficulties in feeding, while others have quite significant problems. However, even if there are problems, you may be sure of one thing: your child’s nutritional needs can be met. It goes without saying that good nutrition is of utmost importance for a child’s satisfactory growth and development....

  9. Chapter 5 EAR PROBLEMS: WHY THEY HAPPEN AND WHAT CAN BE DONE ABOUT THEM
    (pp. 45-54)

    Earaches and other problems with the ears can be painful, and almost all children are bothered with them at some time. Unfortunately, children with clefts have more than their share. In this chapter, we will identify these problems, describe how they develop, and discuss how they can be treated. First, let’s take a quick look at the human ear and the way it works.

    The human ear is divided into three sections (Figure 16). The outer ear is the part that we can see and that we usually refer to when we talk about our ears. This section of the...

  10. [Illustrations]
    (pp. None)
  11. Chapter 6 CLEFTS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE TEETH
    (pp. 55-74)

    Many children with clefts can be expected to have some problems with the development of their teeth and jaws. To understand how clefts can affect these parts of the mouth, it is necessary to know something about the structure of the jaws and normal teeth.

    The bony upper jaw, or maxilla, is the area affected by clefting. If you will look at Figure 17, you will see that the maxilla has three main parts—a central triangular portion (the premaxilla) and a section on each side (the lateral maxillary segments). The lines in the drawing show where these three parts...

  12. Chapter 7 STAYING IN TOUCH: HOW CLEFTS AFFECT SPEECH
    (pp. 75-98)

    At the beginning of this book, we mentioned that cleft palate is a disorder that can be seen, felt, and heard. In this chapter, we will deal with the aspect that can be heard, that is, the problems children with clefts may have with their speech. Before describing these problems, it may be helpful to spend some time explaining what we mean by the term “speech,” how speech is produced, and how it is learned.

    We all know the general meaning of the word “speech.” We know what politicians are doing when they make a speech, and we are aware...

  13. Chapter 8 THE IMAGE IN THE MIRROR: HOW CLEFTS AFFECT SOCIAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT
    (pp. 99-104)

    All parents have high hopes and expectations for their children. They want them to develop a positive self-image, to be liked and make many friends, to do well in school, and to mature into well-adjusted, productive adults. Parents of children with clefts have these same hopes and dreams, but they often wonder whether their child’s physical problems may limit the attainment of these goals. This question may have crossed your mind frequently since the birth of your “special” child.

    As you have learned from the previous chapters of this book, all treatment of children with clefts has as its goal...

  14. Chapter 9 CAN THIS HAPPEN AGAIN? THE IMPORTANCE OF GENETIC COUNSELING
    (pp. 105-110)

    A great deal of research is currently being done on the causes of cleft lip and palate. Researchers are attempting to get a better understanding of the genetic component of the defect and the developmental mechanisms that produce clef ting. In studying this birth defect and many others, scientists are making use of knowledge about human genetics that has been gained in recent years. In the future it may be possible to pinpoint the exact cause of clefting and even to make changes in genetic material that would prevent this defect from occurring in some cases. Although we don’t have...

  15. Chapter 10 A FINAL WORD—OPTIMISM
    (pp. 111-114)

    For all the readers of this book — parents and others interested in knowing more about cleft lip and palate—we hope that one word has come through loudly and clearly. That word isoptimism.

    In the last several years, surgeons, dentists, speech clinicians, and other professionals have learned much and have made great advances in treating cleft lip and palate. Research now underway will continue to increase our understanding of the disorder and improve our care of people with clefts. Even with the treatment currently available, however, it is safe to say that we can expect a child with cleft...

  16. GLOSSARY
    (pp. 115-118)
  17. HELPFUL ORGANIZATIONS
    (pp. 119-122)
  18. SUGGESTED READING
    (pp. 123-124)
  19. INDEX
    (pp. 125-130)
  20. Back Matter
    (pp. 131-131)