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Family History Record Book

Family History Record Book

James B. Bell
Copyright Date: 1980
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 272
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.cttttk27
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  • Book Info
    Family History Record Book
    Book Description:

    The Family History Record Book was first published in 1980. The Family History Record Book is designed to provide tools for research into your family’s history. Following the principles outlined in Searching for Your Ancestors, James B. Bell, a historian and lecturer, has collected charts and forms that will help organize your information. He provides detailed instructions on how to request specific information from various sources (census, immigration and naturalization, land, military, and church records) and how to use the forms for simple and efficient record keeling. This step-by-step system will be a valuable aid for both beginning and experienced genealogists.

    eISBN: 978-0-8166-6145-9
    Subjects: Sociology

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. [i]-[iv])
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. [v]-[vi])
  3. PART I. HOW TO OBTAIN AND COMPILE FAMILY RECORDS

    • What Records Should You Use ?
      (pp. 3-6)

      As I noted in the Preface, ancestors are traced through a variety of records: family, public, church, cemetery, and legal. Following is information about these records, which should help you begin your search.

      Everybody—young and old—asks this question, “How do I begin to write my family’s story?” The answer is so simple and obvious that it is frequently overlooked: begin with yourself and work backward in history. That is step number one. Compile the historical facts about yourself: where and when you were born, where you attended grade school, high school, and college, record any military service, too,...

    • Preparing the Forms and Charts
      (pp. 7-20)

      As you gather the dozens of family names, dates, places of births, marriages, and deaths, it is important to carefully organize and record this information on a chart. This chart, the Generational Family Group Chart, summarizes the data you gather on family members and graphically presents details of your family background.

      Place the Number 1 in the upper-right corner and complete the information noted in the upper-left corner. Then fill in your name on line Number 1. You are Number 1! Also enter the date of your birth, the location, and, if you have married, record the date and place...

  4. PART II. FORMS AND CHARTS

    • A. Generational Family Group Chart
      (pp. 23-70)
    • B. Family Biographical Form
      (pp. 71-90)
    • C. Individual Biographical Form
      (pp. 91-214)
    • D. 1790 United States Census
      (pp. 215-236)
    • E. Military Service Record
      (pp. 237-244)
    • F. Immigrant Arrival Record
      (pp. 245-252)
    • G. Immigration and Naturalization Record
      (pp. 253-260)
    • H. Land Records—Deeds
      (pp. 261-263)